Vanessa Hudgens pays tribute to Kennedy Center honoree Debbie Allen by performing Fame in tiny skirt

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Vanessa Hudgens and the company of the Broadway musical Fame performed the title song of the critically acclaimed musical in honor of Kennedy Center honorary Debbie Allen.

And the High School Musical alumnus took center stage, performing the classic 1980 tune in a well-choreographed video, which aired during the ceremony on CBS June 6, which is currently streaming on Paramount+.

The High School Musical alum showed off her singing, dancing skills and rock-solid petite curves in a skimpy black skirt and yellow cropped top ensemble.

Tribute: Vanessa Hudgens and the company of the Broadway musical Fame performed the title song of the critically acclaimed musical in honor of Kennedy Center honorary Debbie Allen

Front and center: The High School Musical alum cast the classic 1980s tune in a well-choreographed video, which aired during the 43rd annual Kennedy Center Honors special

Front and center: The High School Musical alum cast the classic 1980s tune in a well-choreographed video, which aired during the 43rd annual Kennedy Center Honors special

The video begins with the famous opening riff of Fame’s iconic title track featuring an array of dancers on the steps of the John F. Kennedy Center For The Performing Arts in Washington, DC

As the dancers descend the narrow staircase into an open space, Hudgens steps out of the double doors with several more dancers at her side.

It’s at this point that she delivers the classic opening line: “Baby look at me – And tell me what you see – You haven’t seen the best of me yet – Give me time, I’ll make you forget the rest.”

Iconic Opening: The video begins with the song's signature opening featuring an array of dancers on the steps of the John F. Kennedy Center For The Performing Arts in Washington, D.C.

Iconic Opening: The video begins with the song’s signature opening featuring an array of dancers on the steps of the John F. Kennedy Center For The Performing Arts in Washington, D.C.

Grand entrance: once the dancers descend the narrow staircase into an open space, Hudgens emerges through double doors with several more dancers at her side

Grand entrance: once the dancers descend the narrow staircase into an open space, Hudgens emerges through double doors with several more dancers at her side

Lyrics begin: Hudgens then delivers the classic opening line: 'Baby look at me - And tell me what you see - You ain't seen the best of me yet - Give me time I'll make you forget the rest'

Lyrics begin: Hudgens then delivers the classic opening line: ‘Baby look at me – And tell me what you see – You ain’t seen the best of me yet – Give me time I’ll make you forget the rest’

Get up: Dressed in a small black wrap skirt and a yellow crop top, the singer and actress was lifted onto a picnic table, positioned in a grassy field

Get up: Dressed in a small black wrap skirt and a yellow crop top, the singer and actress was lifted onto a picnic table, positioned in a grassy field

The little black wrap skirt showed her sturdy figure and her thighs.

But in a nod to the hit movie, television series and musical, she wore burgundy stockings to her knees and white socks that resembled leg warmers, which was an 80s fad, in part a compliment to Fame’s success.

For an extra touch, she let go of her crop top, slipped on a pair of white sneakers and let her raven locks pull up into a stylish ponytail.

It wasn’t long before two dancers lifted Hudgens onto a picnic table, which stood in a grassy field.

'80s Fashion: In a nod to the hit film, television and musical, she wore burgundy stockings to her knees and white tube socks that resembled leg warmers, which was an '80s fad, in part a compliment to Fame's success

’80s Fashion: In a nod to the hit film, television and musical, she wore burgundy stockings to her knees and white tube socks that resembled leg warmers, which was an ’80s fad, in part a compliment to Fame’s success

Make a move: From there, the actress and singer, 32, led the troupe onto the street

Make a move: From there, the actress and singer, 32, led the troupe onto the street

Pack Leader: Hudgens led the group into another well-choreographed dance routine for the song's bridge as they all got together

Pack Leader: Hudgens led the group into another well-choreographed dance routine for the song’s bridge as they all got together

Dancing on the table, the tune reached the iconic lyrics that transitioned into the catchy chorus.

‘Remember my name – Fame – I’m going to live forever – I’m going to learn to fly – High – I fell it coming together – People will see me and cry – Fame – I’m going to reach the sky – Light as a flame in the sky – Fame – I will live forever – Baby remember my name.’

From there, the actress and singer, 32, led the troupe out into the street which turned into a different dance routine for the song’s bridge as they all got together.

Hudgens and his company ended up breaking out all the motions around a classic yellow checkered taxi of yesteryear.

Blast from the past: the order then shifted to a classic yellow checkered cab

Blast from the past: the order then shifted to a classic yellow checkered cab

Building momentum: the dancers all gathered as they ramped up the intensity

Building momentum: the dancers all gathered as they ramped up the intensity

Fam crescendo: Hudgens and his company ended up shutting down all movement around the yellow checkered cab, with a view from above

Fam crescendo: Hudgens and his company ended up shutting down all movement around the yellow checkered cab, with a view from above

With the lingering effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, the public was unable to enjoy the live tribute to performances typically played at the annual ceremony.

The 43rd Annual Kennedy Center Honors Special airs on CBS on June 6, but can be streamed on Paramount+.

Kennedy Center honors are recognized for their contributions to American culture through the performing arts in music, dance, theater, opera, movies, or television, and are confirmed by the Executive Committee of the Center’s Board of Trustees.

Allen, a three-time winner of Choreography for the series Fame and The Motown 25th Anniversary Special, was first introduced as Lydia Grant in the film (1980). Although her role in the film was relatively small, Lydia became a central figure in the television adaptation, which ran from 1982 to 1987.

Say Cheese: Hudgens, 32, posed with part of the dancer for a social media photo

Say Cheese: Hudgens, 32, posed with part of the dancer for a social media photo

In addition to Allen, this year’s Kennedy Center recipients also included Joan Baez, Garth Brooks, Midori, and Dick Van Dyke.

“I feel really humbled to be named a 2020 Kennedy Center Honoree. This is so much more than our country’s highest artistic award, it is a measure of how my footprint has resonated immensely over the years and in this time as a path of light. uncertainty, fear and the search for hope,” Debbie Allen said in a statement Broadway World.

“I share this glorious achievement with my family, mentors and students who have inspired and pushed me. I look forward to being part of a fresh start for America and reminding the world how essential the performing arts are in our lives. Much Gratitude.’

Honoree: Allen, a three-time winner of Choreography for the series Fame and The Motown 25th Anniversary Special, was first introduced as Lydia Grant in the film (1980).  She would see her role become a central figure in the television adaptation, which ran from 1982 to 1987

Honoree: Allen, a three-time winner of Choreography for the series Fame and The Motown 25th Anniversary Special, was first introduced as Lydia Grant in the film (1980). She would see her role become a central figure in the television adaptation, which ran from 1982 to 1987

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