Vaccine Taskforce boss Kate Bingham ‘becomes a lady’ for overseeing jab buying success

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The ex-head of the vaccine task force Kate Bingham is reportedly turning into a lady.

Venture capitalist Ms Bingham will be rewarded for her efforts during the Covid-19 pandemic, according to the Sunday Telegraph, on the Queen’s upcoming Birthday Honors list.

In her unpaid role as chair of the UK’s Vaccine Taskforce, she led vaccine procurement and helped secure more than 350 million doses of seven different vaccines, including 40 million doses of the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine, and 100 million doses of the injection developed by Oxford. and AstraZeneca.

Her ability to lead the UK’s efforts to find a coronavirus shot was initially questioned repeatedly because she had no experience buying vaccines.

According to the Sunday Telegraph, venture capitalist Ms Bingham will be rewarded for her efforts during the Covid-19 pandemic, on the Queen's upcoming Birthday Honors list.

According to the Sunday Telegraph, venture capitalist Ms Bingham will be rewarded for her efforts during the Covid-19 pandemic, on the Queen’s upcoming Birthday Honors list.

Her ability to lead the UK's efforts to find a coronavirus shot was initially questioned repeatedly because she had no experience buying vaccines.

Her ability to lead the UK's efforts to find a coronavirus shot was initially questioned repeatedly because she had no experience buying vaccines.

Her ability to lead the UK’s efforts to find a coronavirus shot was initially questioned repeatedly because she had no experience buying vaccines.

There were also outcry of favoritism when she was chosen by Boris Johnson for being married to one of his most loyal ministers, Jesse Norman, Treasury Financial Secretary.

The Oxford and Harvard-trained businesswoman even admitted she wasn’t a “complete expert” in vaccines and considered turning down the job until her oldest daughter persuaded her otherwise.

But by January this year, calls were being made for her to be distinguished as Britain spearheaded the global race to vaccinate its population, with some arguing that her appointment was one of the prime minister’s few inspired decisions of the former. closing.

Professor Sir John Bell, Regius Professor of Medicine at Oxford, recently said the UK had “got only 30 million doses of Pfizer/BioNTech through her”, while others said she brought in millions more from other companies through sheer perseverance, using her contacts and demanded meetings with CEOs until they relented.

It came as Boris Johnson prepared to urge G7 leaders to “beat Covid” by vaccinating the world by the end of next year as he pushes for a global surveillance system to catch new variants before landing back in lock down can.

The prime minister will emphasize the importance of the global vaccine program when he meets world leaders – including US President Joe Biden – in Cornwall on Friday for the first in-person G7 meeting since the pandemic struck.

Ahead of their meeting in Carbis Bay on June 11-13, Johnson is calling on his colleagues to “face the greatest challenge of the post-war era” by “vaccinating the world by the end of next year,” in a move he says would be the greatest achievement in medical history.

It comes as Covid-19 cases have continued to rise in the UK, amid reports the Prime Minister is considering his goal of lifting all restrictions in England by at least two weeks by June 21, so more people can be fully vaccinated.

Mr Johnson said: “I call on my fellow G7 leaders to join us in ending this horrific pandemic and pledge never to let the devastation wrought by the coronavirus happen again.” .’

Number 10 said the prime minister will tell his counterparts that the world’s largest economies should lower barriers to the international distribution of vaccines and share excess doses with developing countries bilaterally and through Covax, the United Nations-backed program that aims to provide low-cost vaccines. and middle-income countries with jabs.

dr. David Nabarro, Covid-19 Special Envoy to the World Health Organization (WHO), described the global vaccination ambition as “amazing”.

Speaking to Sky News’ Trevor Phillips on Sunday’s program, Dr. Nabarro said approval of the move at G7 level would make the possibility of getting the world vaccinated by the end of 2022 a “real prospect.”

The Sunday Times reported that Mr Johnson is preparing to hand over 100 million vaccine doses to developing countries, and this year is donating £2 billion in shots to global pressure to vaccinate every human being against Covid-19.

Most jabs will be Oxford/AstraZeneca parties, the paper said.

The UK promised in February to give excess doses to Covax but has yet to receive any of the 400 million it has donated on order, with Health Minister Matt Hancock arguing there are no surplus injections available as the NHS’s own vaccine program is still in progress.

As part of Britain’s G7 presidency, officials said the prime minister will encourage support for a global pandemic radar, a surveillance system that aims to detect vaccine-resistant variants before they have a chance to spread.

Downing Street argued that the UK had “led the effort to ensure that the world’s poorest and most vulnerable people have access to vaccines”, citing the role the Westminster government played in funding the Oxford/AstraZeneca project. prick.

Now that the injection has been made available at cost, No. 10 said nearly one in three injections administered worldwide has been the Oxford vaccine, with 96 percent of the 80 million injections given by Covax being provided by AstraZeneca.

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