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UT-Austin is being prosecuted by two white students who claim they have been refused entry on the basis of race

Two white students are behind a federal lawsuit alleging that they were wrongfully denied access to the University of Texas at Austin because of their race.

The lawsuit of the nonprofit fair-entry students was filed Monday, claiming that the university’s use of racial preferences in admission violates the 14th Amendment, federal civil rights laws, and Texas law.

The lawsuit says that “ at least two members ” applied and were denied access to the University of Texas at Austin (UT-Austin) in 2018 and 2019. Students are not named in the lawsuit.

The applicants eventually went to several schools in Texas and are “ready and able to apply for transfer to UT-Austin when it stops discriminating against applicants based on race and ethnicity,” the complaint says.

UT-Austin says it uses a holistic admission process in accepting students, including the consideration of race to build a diverse student population, and 40 percent of the student population in 2019 was white.

Students for Fair Admissions claims to have more than 20,000 members, including students, parents and others who believe that considering racing in a college is unfair and unconstitutional.

On Monday, the Students for Fair Admissions filed a lawsuit against the University of Texas at Austin against their race consideration policy. The lawsuit was filed on behalf of two white students who applied and access to the university was denied in 2018 and 2019.

On Monday, the Students for Fair Admissions filed a lawsuit against the University of Texas at Austin against their race consideration policy. The lawsuit was filed on behalf of two white students who applied and access to the university was denied in 2018 and 2019.

The group filed a similar case against UT-Austin in 2018, but was recently turned down The statesman. The organization also sued officials at Harvard University, but last fall, a federal judge confirmed Harvard’s race-conscious admissions policy, saying it was constitutional.

According to a survey of UT-Austin students in fall 2019, 38.8 percent of students were white, the largest target group in school. Among the student profile was 24.4 percent Hispanic, 22.6 percent Asian, 5.1 percent black, and 5.2 percent foreign.

For Fall 2018 to Spring 2019, 40,804 undergraduate students were enrolled.

The lawsuit lists over a dozen UT Austin officials as defendants, including James B. Milliken, the Chancellor of the UT system, and Jay Hartzell, the interim president of the school.

The organization strives for a permanent injunction preventing UT-Austin leaders from using race as a factor in future student admission.

UT-Austin has been the hit with several major legal challenges regarding the consideration of race and ethnicity when entering university.

UT-Austin says it uses a holistic admission process in accepting students, including the consideration of race to build a diverse student population, and 40 percent of the 2019 student population was white in the fall 2019 semester undergraduate class

UT-Austin says it uses a holistic admission process in accepting students, including the consideration of race to build a diverse student population, and 40 percent of the 2019 student population was white in the fall 2019 semester undergraduate class

UT-Austin says it uses a holistic admission process in accepting students, including the consideration of race to build a diverse student population, and 40 percent of the 2019 student population was white in the fall 2019 semester undergraduate class

Fisher vs. University of Texas in 2013 and 2016, in which the United States Supreme Court ruled that the limited use of racing in admissions by the UT was constitutional.

The Supreme Court decision in the Fisher case confirmed UT-Austin’s efforts to develop a diverse student organization that brings educational benefits to all students. The University believes that diversity is essential to fulfill its public mission and that the educational benefits of diversity enhance all UT-Austin students, the higher education community and the nation, ”said the school on its website.

But in Monday’s lawsuit, Students for Fair Admissions accuse the university of not fulfilling its obligation in the 2016 Fisher ruling to continue investigating the use of race in their admission process.

James B. Milliken, the Chancellor of the UT system

James B. Milliken, the Chancellor of the UT system

UT-Austin interim president Jay Hartzell

UT-Austin interim president Jay Hartzell

The lawsuit appoints more than a dozen UT Austin officials as defendants, including James B. Milliken (left), the UT system’s chancellor, and Jay Hartzell (right), the school’s interim president

In the Fisher Vs. UT-Austin case of 2013 prosecutors Abigail Noel Fisher and Rachel Multer Michalewicz alleged that they were refused entry to the school based on their race. That case went to the Supreme Court, which sided with the school, saying their consideration of race on admission is constitutional. Fisher pictured in 2012

In the Fisher Vs. UT-Austin case of 2013 prosecutors Abigail Noel Fisher and Rachel Multer Michalewicz alleged that they were refused entry to the school based on their race. That case went to the Supreme Court, which sided with the school, saying their consideration of race on admission is constitutional. Fisher pictured in 2012

In the Fisher Vs. UT-Austin case of 2013 prosecutors Abigail Noel Fisher and Rachel Multer Michalewicz alleged that they were refused entry to the school based on their race. That case went to the Supreme Court, which sided with the school, saying their consideration of race on admission is constitutional. Fisher pictured in 2012

“The Supreme Court has not given the University of Texas a blank check to use race-based preferences forever, and the university has failed to fulfill its obligation to re-examine its policies,” said Edward Blum, the organization’s president. lawsuit.

UT-Austin’s spokesperson JB Bird says the university is reviewing the new lawsuit.

“We agreed with the judge’s decision to dismiss SFFA’s previous lawsuit, and we continue to have confidence in the legality and constitutionality of UT Austin’s holistic admissions policy, which the U.S. Supreme Court upheld in 2016,” he said. in a statement.

The lawsuit comes just a week after the school announced new measures to recruit, support, and detain non-white students at the school in an effort to reach underrepresented students across Texas and improve educational opportunities for historically marginalized students .

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