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Before: a submarine from post-war history went to the water for the first time in almost 50 years when heavy rainfall flooded his military museum - causing the weather to land

Submarine who once sunk THREE Japanese submarines in 76 hours during World War II goes back into the water after flash floods in Oklahoma rebuilt the historic vessel

  • Floods in Oklahoma have flooded rivers – around a historic American part
  • The USS Batfish once sank three Japanese imperial submarines in just 76 hours
  • At its peak, it was able to dive more than 400 feet below the surface and stay under water for 48 hours, carrying 24 torpedoes and various deck guns
  • After the Second World War it was redesignated as an educational sub – until 1952
  • At the height of the Korean war, the battle-tested sub was called into action again
  • It was finally stopped in 1969 and rescued from scrap heap by American veterans
  • Almost 50 years after it was last driven, the Arkansas River brought it back to life
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A historic submarine from World War II came to the waters for the first time in nearly 50 years when heavy rainfall flooded the home of the military museum – causing it to flood again.

The USS Batfish, a 77-year-old submarine from the Balao class, was exhibited at the Muskogee & # 39; s War Memorial Park in Oklahoma – a region that has been troubled by flooding and tornadoes this week – causing rivers to flood and banks.

Dry docking in a park along the Arkansas River since 1973, flooded water brought the USS Batfish – best known for the sinking of three Japanese imperial warships during a 76-hour period in 1945 – back to life when it floated comfortably again.

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After: A historic submarine from World War II came to the waters for the first time in nearly 50 years when heavy rainfall flooded his military museum - causing the weather to land

Before and after: A historic submarine from World War II came to the waters for the first time in nearly 50 years when heavy rainfall flooded his military museum – causing the weather to land

Wartime Prime: Drained in a park along the Arkansas River since 1973, flooded water brought the USS Batfish - best known for sinking three Japanese imperial warships during a 76-hour period in 1945 - back to life when it floated comfortably ( photo in 1943)

Wartime Prime: Drained in a park along the Arkansas River since 1973, flooded water brought the USS Batfish - best known for sinking three Japanese imperial warships during a 76-hour period in 1945 - back to life when it floated comfortably ( photo in 1943)

Wartime Prime: Drained in a park along the Arkansas River since 1973, flooded water brought the USS Batfish – best known for sinking three Japanese imperial warships during a 76-hour period in 1945 – back to life when it floated comfortably ( photo in 1943)

The devastating floods in Oklahoma caused great damage to the state and ensured that workers in the museum hastily detained objects from the Second World War.

Local firefighters were brought in to fill ballast tanks to level the vessel, although it remains to be seen whether the old subordinate to a fish found off the coast of Peru will remain watertight for much longer.

The USS Batfish remains a huge source of local pride and has proven itself a devastating part of the US Navy arsenal during the war.

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Launched from Kittery, Maine on May 5, 1943, the submarine steamed off to participate in the savage battle that took place in the Pacific. It quickly joined the Pacific Fleet and conducted patrols in the Philippines and the South China Sea – with nine Japanese ships and three submarines sank during the 21-month tour.

Due to the almost historic flooding in Muskogee, the USS Batfish is floating again. I wonder if this is the first time it has been floating since it was last in military service? Maybe someone can investigate this to find out. KOTV – News about 6 #okwx

Posted by Darren Stephens – News about StormTracker 6 on Wednesday, May 22, 2019

Storms: The devastating floods in Oklahoma caused great damage to the state and caused workers in the museum to remove hastily removed objects from the Second World War from the vault

Storms: The devastating floods in Oklahoma caused great damage to the state and caused workers in the museum to remove hastily removed objects from the Second World War from the vault

Storms: The devastating floods in Oklahoma caused great damage to the state and caused workers in the museum to remove hastily removed objects from the Second World War from the vault

Waterproof: Local firefighters were brought in to fill ballast tanks to level the vessel, although it remains to be seen whether the old subordinate to a fish found off the coast of Peru will remain waterproof for much longer

Waterproof: Local firefighters were brought in to fill ballast tanks to level the vessel, although it remains to be seen whether the old subordinate to a fish found off the coast of Peru will remain waterproof for much longer

Waterproof: Local firefighters were brought in to fill ballast tanks to level the vessel, although it remains to be seen whether the old subordinate to a fish found off the coast of Peru will remain waterproof for much longer

Flooded: The USS Batfish remains a huge source of local pride and has proven itself a devastating part of the US arsenal to the navy during the war
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Flooded: The USS Batfish remains a huge source of local pride and has proven itself a devastating part of the US arsenal to the navy during the war

Flooded: The USS Batfish remains a huge source of local pride and has proven itself a devastating part of the US arsenal to the navy during the war

The three Japanese submarines that were sunk in the 76-hour period proved to be one of the highlights of the US Navy operations by using the radar of the Japanese against them – to zone them at their shielded positions and to to destroy in remarkably fast succession.

This performance has not been matched since then and USS Batfish is to date the most successful submarine killer sub in history.

The ship and its crew received a Presidential Unit Citation and six combat stars for their efforts.

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At its peak, it was able to dive more than 400 feet below the surface and stay under water for 48 hours.

The 311ft diesel-electric submarine was armed with 24 torpedoes and several large-scale deck guns during months of patrols.

WWII: The three Japanese submarines that were sunk in the 76-hour period proved to be one of the high points of US Navy operations by using the radar of the Japanese against them - placing them in zones at their shielded positions and destroy them one after the other (depicted in 1943)

WWII: The three Japanese submarines that were sunk in the 76-hour period proved to be one of the high points of US Navy operations by using the radar of the Japanese against them - placing them in zones at their shielded positions and destroy them one after the other (depicted in 1943)

WWII: The three Japanese submarines that were sunk in the 76-hour period proved to be one of the high points of US Navy operations by using the radar of the Japanese against them – placing them in zones at their shielded positions and destroy them one after the other (depicted in 1943)

Brave commitment: this achievement has not been matched since then and USS Batfish is still the most successful submarine killer sub in history to date. The ship and its crew received a Presidential Unit Citation and six combat stars for their efforts

Brave commitment: this achievement has not been matched since then and USS Batfish is still the most successful submarine killer sub in history to date. The ship and its crew received a Presidential Unit Citation and six combat stars for their efforts

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Brave commitment: this achievement has not been matched since then and USS Batfish is still the most successful submarine killer sub in history to date. The ship and its crew received a Presidential Unit Citation and six combat stars for their efforts

Retirement: after its excellent service, the USS Batfish was taken out of service in 1946 and again referred to as a training vessel, but was put back into service at the height of the Korean war in 1952 and stationed in the Caribbean as part of the Atlantic fleet.

Retirement: after its excellent service, the USS Batfish was taken out of service in 1946 and again referred to as a training vessel, but was put back into service at the height of the Korean war in 1952 and stationed in the Caribbean as part of the Atlantic fleet.

Retirement: after its excellent service, the USS Batfish was taken out of service in 1946 and again referred to as a training ship, before being put back into service during the Korean war in 1952 and stationed in the Caribbean as part of the Atlantic fleet

After its excellent service, the USS Batfish was retired from service in 1946 and again intended as a training ship, only to be taken into service again at the height of the Korean war in 1952 and to become part of the Atlantic fleet in the Caribbean stationed.

However, it would never see the fight and spent the rest of its days as a trainer before it was shut down in 1969.

In the same year, a group of military veterans living in Arkansas approached the Navy to acquire a dismantled submarine for a permanent water park in Muskogee.

With great difficulty, workers moved it from its berth in New Orleans to the park in Oklahoma via the Mississippi and Arkansas rivers. A bowl was dug into the lawn and then flooded. The project was finally completed in 1973.

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