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Using Hormone Replacement Therapy to Cope Menopause ‘Reduces the Risk of Common Infections’

Using Hormone Replacement Therapy to Cope Menopause ‘Reduces the Risk of Common Infections’

  • New evidence from the University of Texas found that women using HRT had a wider variety of beneficial bacteria in their urine, which reduces the risk of UTIs
  • The study confirmed the theory that postmenopausal women have more infections
  • Researchers spoke to 75 postmenopausal women with different UTI histories

Taking hormone replacement therapy to deal with menopause can protect women from common infections.

New evidence suggests that HRT may help fight urinary tract infections (UTI) – a problem that affects up to 60 percent of women.

Researchers from the University of Texas, Dallas, found that women who took HRT had a wider variety of beneficial bacteria in their urine, which they say reduces the risk of urinary tract infections.

Estrogen in HRT is said to stimulate the growth of these beneficial bacteria.

Researchers have found that taking HRT may reduce the risk of urinary tract infections

Researchers have found that taking HRT may reduce the risk of urinary tract infections

The researchers assessed bacterial DNA from 75 postmenopausal women – 25 who had never had a UTI, 25 who had had recurring UTIs in the past, and 25 who were currently suffering from a UTI, luckily a urologist in London can provide treatment.

Research leader Dr. Nicole De Nisco said, “The DNA analysis revealed two things.

First, women with recurrent infections have fewer types of bacteria in their urine than women without infections; women who do not have recurring urinary tract infections have an approximately ten times greater variety of bacteria.

Second, 34 of the women received menopausal hormone therapy and had more Lactobacillus-like bacteria in their urine, which could mean that the estrogen in [HRT] supports the growth of Lactobacillus in the genitourinary tract.

“We also found that women were taking them [HRT] had more Lactobacillus via patches or orally than women who used MHT via vaginal cream. ‘

Dr. The Nisco presented her research via video link to the Congress of the European Association of Urology (EAU) and added, “This is important because Lactobacilli are known to play a protective role against infections.

This finding is also consistent with the observation that postmenopausal women, who have less natural estrogen, are more likely to suffer from infections.

As far as we know, this is the first targeted analysis of the bacteria in the urogenital tract of postmenopausal women, and the results indicate that estrogen use is associated with high levels of Lactobacilli in the urine, which could potentially provide some protection against infection . ‘

HRT relieves menopausal symptoms such as depression, hot flashes, headaches and night sweats.

The treatment – which comes in patches, pills, and creams – delivers estrogen when the body stops making it.

HRT use has fallen sharply since a series of studies related to cancer were published in 2002 and 2003.

Scientists from the University of Texas at Dallas assessed bacteria from 75 women in their study

Scientists from the University of Texas at Dallas assessed bacteria from 75 women in their study

Scientists from the University of Texas at Dallas assessed bacteria from 75 women in their study

Regulations in England have fallen from six million 2000 to 2.5 million in 2017.

But the balance has fallen back in favor of HRT in recent years, with experts emphasizing that while the treatment slightly increases the risk of cancer, it only affects a small number of women.

Professor Florian Wagenlehner, chair of the EAU specialist group on infections in urology, said, “This study, which evaluates the urinary microbiome in postmenopausal women, shows that patients with fewer urinary tract infections have a greater species diversity in their urine.

‘We are increasingly seeing indications that diversity in the microbiome prevents infections.

“The growth of lactobacillus species is dependent on estrogen, so estrogen supplementation may be a useful therapy in postmenopausal patients.”

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