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Use of e-cigarettes among US adults DROPPED in 2020 – with 17% fall for under-20s

E-cigarette use has declined during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic, a new study shows.

Researchers at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, found that use of the devices dropped by seven percent between 2018 and 2020, including a 17 percent drop among people ages 18 to 20 in particular.

It is a reversal in the trend of increasing e-cigarette use that many officials have raised the alarm about. In fact, President Joe Biden has prioritized device restrictions during the first half of his presidency.

Regulators have cracked down on the devices largely blamed for the recent surge in teenage nicotine use. Data from minors are not included in this study.

Researchers found that overall e-cigarette use declined in 2020 compared to 2018, with the declines fueled by the 18-20 age group

Researchers found that overall e-cigarette use declined in 2020 compared to 2018, with the declines fueled by the 18-20 age group

Researchers, who published their findings Friday in JAMA network openedcollected data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System for the study.

The survey included a total of 994,307 respondents, each of whom answered whether they were users of the devices and how often they vape.

In 2017, 4.4 percent of American adults reported using an e-cigarette. In 2018, the figure rose by 25 percent to 5.5 percent.

Researchers blame flavored e-cigarettes for this increase, noting that it was greatest among younger people.

This increase, observed mainly in younger age groups, was associated with the concomitant increase in the availability of high nicotine flavored products and pod-mod devices (modular vaping devices with refillable or replaceable nicotine cartridges or pods, such as branded vaping devices). JUUL ),’ they wrote in the study.

Data from 2019 has not been collected. In 2020, total e-cigarette use fell to 5.1 percent, down seven percent from two years earlier.

The most dramatic shift was seen in people aged 18 to 20 – the youngest group included in the study.

Devices like JUULs are largely responsible for the recent rise in teenage tobacco use because of their fruity flavors and an easy way to carry and use them without detection (file photo)

Devices like JUULs are largely responsible for the recent rise in teenage tobacco use because of their fruity flavors and an easy way to carry and use them without detection (file photo)

Nearly one in five, or 19 percent, of people in the age group reported to the survey that they had used an e-cigarette in the past year in 2018.

That figure had fallen 17 percent to 15.6 percent in 2020, a sharp drop in just two years.

However, the age just above, 21 to 24, saw a dramatic increase in the use of the devices.

Despite the decline, this was still the age group that made the most use of the controversial devices.

Still, researchers believe this is a sign that certain restrictions on access to the devices are having an impact.

“The modest reduction in e-cigarette use, especially among adults under the age of 21, may be an early sign of the impact of several recently implemented federal and state policies,” they wrote.

The team highlights the shift in December 2019 of the legal age to buy tobacco products from 18 to 21 years.

Public education campaigns about the dangers of e-cigarettes and nicotine addiction in general could also have played a role.

The debate surrounding e-cigarettes has raged in recent months, after the FDA banned flavored nicotine cartridges in February 2020.

To stay on the shelves, companies had to apply individually to be allowed on the market.

Juul Labs, whose products became the face of the dangerous underage smoking trend after gaining popularity in the 2010s, was rejected by the FDA last month.

It has appealed the decision and has since been granted a residence permit allowing it to continue selling in America.

‘[The bans last year] will help save lives, especially among those disproportionately affected by these deadly products,” the FDA wrote in a statement last year.

“With these actions, the FDA will significantly help reduce youth initiation and increase the likelihood of smoking cessation.”

To get around these orders, many companies started using synthetic forms of the drug in their devices to evade regulators. That loophole was closed in April.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) also published a study in March that found that more than 2.5 million U.S. college students had used some tobacco product by 2021 — a definition that includes nicotine devices that don’t dispense tobacco.

Officials reported that 80 percent of tobacco use was due to disposable e-cigarettes and cartridge products — such as a Juul.

The CDC reports that more than 2.5 million students in the U.S. were

The CDC reports that more than 2.5 million students in the U.S. were “current” users of tobacco products by 2021. This includes 13% of high school students and 4% of high school students

Disposable e-cigarettes and refillable cartridges account for more than 80% of teenage tobacco use in America

Disposable e-cigarettes and refillable cartridges account for more than 80% of teenage tobacco use in America

In the study, approximately 2.06 million high school students — 13 percent of the study population — and four percent of high school students — 470,000 participants — reported “current” tobacco use.

By comparison, in 2020, the CDC reported that eight percent of high school students and three percent of high school students were current tobacco users.

Students were also asked if they had ever used tobacco products in their lives, with 34 percent of high school students and 11 percent of high school students reporting at least one use.

According to the CDC study, e-cigarette devices were the most responsible for the increase in nicotine and tobacco use over the past year.

Of the students who reported being current smokers, 54 percent used a disposable e-cigarette and 29 percent reported using some sort of refillable device — similar to a Juul.

Together, the devices that allow teens to easily and prominently consume nicotine account for more than 80 percent of total student tobacco use.

Nicotine does not have many of the same negative effects and cancer risks as tobacco, but it does increase the risk of high blood pressure, artery narrowing and increased heart rate.

The use of e-cigarettes among school-aged children can be attributed to their taste, and the devices resemble a USB stick, allowing children to easily carry them to school without getting caught.

Some states and cities have banned the sale of flavored nicotine products, though there have been mixed results as to whether they have successfully prevented teens from picking up the habit.

Opponents of these bans say they will encourage teens to use more harmful tobacco products such as cigarettes instead of nicotine, which carries less risk.

“By bashing safer nicotine products like vaping, we are inadvertently going to encourage high school students to smoke instead, which will be a terrible result,” Mark Oates, director of consumer advocacy group We Vape, told DailyMail.com in March.

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