USC campus gynecologist was prey to vulnerable Asian students

George Tyndall was eventually fired by USC in 2017 after 20 years of complaints

George Tyndall was eventually fired by USC in 2017 after 20 years of complaints

USC gynecologist George Tyndall was reported due to & # 39; prey on vulnerable Asian women & # 39; and was described as a & # 39; psychopath & # 39; but was still not fired by the school, it has come forward.

Tyndall has never been arrested, but has been publicly accused of high sexual misconduct in the last 18 months.

He denies misconduct and USC has agreed to pay $ 215 million to victims through a settlement.

On Friday, a judge released the files from USC to The Los Angeles Times as part of a request for freedom of information.

They revealed how the college launched an investigation into him after receiving numerous complaints about his behavior in 1997.

The college hired a company for the investigation and in 2016 it handed over its findings.

The report said in part that Tyndall was aimed at Asian women who had a poor understanding of English and were unfamiliar with gynecology, making them easy targets.

If the patients were young and Asian, they were more likely to take a pelvic exam

Internal investigation report 2016

& # 39; If the patients were young and Asian, they were more likely to take a pelvic exam, & # 39; he said.

In 1997 a woman wrote to the university and warned them to fire him or take the risk & # 39; a big future lawsuit on your hands & # 39 ;.

She urged the college to fire him, and said he was the & # 39; worst doctor she'd ever seen & # 39 ;.

Two others filed complaints that year but he was allowed to stay and instead thanked his supervisor for bringing the matter to his attention.

Complaints about sexual behavior towards patients started in 2000 when he told an anecdote about the sexual escapades of a guitarist.

The patient wrote in her complaint: & # 39; After such a disgusting display of unprofessionalism, I have lost all faith in you as my doctor. & # 39;

There were other complaints from & # 39; chaperones & # 39; – nurses and assistants who had to be present for exams – who said he would block their view of pelvic exams by placing a curtain between them and the lower bodies of the patients.

USC ignored the complaints for decades, allowing him to keep his job. It has since set up a $ 215 million settlement fund for the victims

USC ignored the complaints for decades, allowing him to keep his job. It has since set up a $ 215 million settlement fund for the victims

USC ignored the complaints for decades, allowing him to keep his job. It has since set up a $ 215 million settlement fund for the victims

In 2003 one of the complaints read: "GT again does not allow Mas [medical assistants] to be behind the curtain while chaperoning MD during pelvic exams."

Six years later, a student complained about him as a compliment for her public hair and in 2010, someone reported that he had performed a pelvic exam on her in 2004 without wearing a glove.

The worst doctor I've ever seen in my life … if you don't want a big future legal case for you, I strongly suggest the termination of this man.

An investigation into his behavior was started in 2013 at the request of his supervisor.

As part of that, students reported that he & # 39; creepy & # 39; used to be. One of them said she didn't want to let her go and asked: & # 39; What is more important than your health? & # 39;

He was allowed to keep his job, but after the researcher noticed that there was & # 39; insufficient evidence of any violation of university policy to justify research & # 39 ;.

Around 2016, a nurse who was frustrated by the situation consulted a consulted woman for rape and USC hired the external company to conduct an investigation.

He was immediately taken on leave and did not treat another patient, but was not fired.

The destructive 17-page report showed that not only did his pelvic exams fall outside the standard of medical practice, but he also & # 39; dangerous opinions & # 39; had about breast exams.

It also turned out that he photographed the patient's genitals and used a New York state laboratory to develop images, sometimes with & # 39; dubious explanations & # 39; gave.

The photo shows some of the dozens of women who have accused Tyndall of misconduct in public

The photo shows some of the dozens of women who have accused Tyndall of misconduct in public

The photo shows some of the dozens of women who have accused Tyndall of misconduct in public

& # 39; If the patients were young and Asian, they were more likely to have completed a pelvic exam & # 39 ;, they wrote.

In particular, the researchers noted that many of these women whom he bullied were unlikely to understand a situation in which they were abused or violated.

& # 39; It would be easy for a healthcare provider to take advantage of this & # 39 ;, the researchers wrote.

They also said he had signs of & # 39; psychopathy & # 39; showed, in particular, his poor hygiene, potting and his desire to keep the used IUD from a patient.

During his interrogation by medical experts as part of the study, he said that all his views were supported by scientific evidence, including his opinion that doing Kegel was related to orgasms.

When asked about the source of that opinion, he said it was a Reader's Digest article he had read 20 years earlier.

Nevertheless, the experts recommended a & # 39; safe road & # 39; for him to continue treating patients.

Tyndall was only fired in 2017. Since then, dozens of women have sued him and USC for claiming to have covered his misconduct.

He is being investigated by a grand jury for sexual crimes but has not been charged.

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