USA Today removes the word ‘male’ from opinion piece by female runner

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USA Today removed the word “man” from an op-ed by a female runner after calling out the “unfair fight” against transgender athletes.

Chelsea Mitchell wrote about her time in Connecticut in one piece for the site published last week where she said she had lost to ‘male runners’.

Without consultation, USA Today then removed the word ‘man’, called it ‘hurtful’ and turned it instead to ‘transgender’.

That decision has been dismissed by Mitchell’s attorney, Christiana Holcomb, as “appeasing the mafia,” who tweeted, “This blatant censorship violates the trust we place in the media to be honest mediators in the public debate.”

Holcomb added: “ @USATODAY posted our client Chelsea Mitchell’s opinion of the dishonesty she experienced when forced to compete with male athletes.

But after backlash from the awakened crowd, editors unilaterally changed Chelsea’s words, calling them “ hurtful language. ” What was the “hurtful language” editors removed from Chelsea’s op-ed three days after publication? The word “man”.

USA Today has violated its principles to appease the crowd. This blatant censorship violates the trust we place in the media to be honest mediators in the public debate.

“Chelsea’s experience and position are important.”

Holcomb then shared a link to Alliance that defends freedom who ran the full version of Chelsea without the changes.

USA Today removed the word

USA Today removed the word “male” from an op-ed by a female runner after calling out the “unfair fight” against transgender athletes. That decision has been dismissed by Mitchell’s attorney, Christiana Holcomb, as “ appeasing the mafia, ” who tweeted, “ This blatant censorship violates the trust we place in the media to be honest mediators in the public debate. ”

Chelsea Mitchell, left, runs to Terry Miller, center, in February last year.  Mitchell, along with two other runners, filed a lawsuit early last year to block a state policy that allows high school students to compete based on the gender they identify with, arguing that transgender girls have an unfair physical advantage.

Chelsea Mitchell, left, runs to Terry Miller, center, in February last year. Mitchell, along with two other runners, filed a lawsuit early last year to block a state policy that allows high school students to compete based on the gender they identify with, arguing that transgender girls have an unfair physical advantage.

Mitchell, along with two other runners, filed a lawsuit early last year to block a state policy that allows high school students to compete based on the gender they identify with, arguing that transgender girls have an unfair physical advantage.

They are appealing after the case was dismissed by a judge last month.

The lawsuit is about two transgender sprinters, Terry Miller and Andraya Yearwood, who have often outperformed their cisgender competitors. According to the lawsuit, the two seniors have jointly won 15 girls indoor or outdoor championships since 2017.

Connecticut is one of only 17 states where high school athletes can compete in sports without regulation on the basis of their gender identity, and three high school athletes have filed a lawsuit to prevent transgender athletes from participating.

Without consultation, USA Today has removed the word

Without consultation, USA Today has removed the word “male” and called it “hurtful.”

Holcomb then shared a link to Alliance Defending Freedom, which ran Chelsea's entire opinion

Holcomb then shared a link to Alliance Defending Freedom, which ran Chelsea’s entire opinion

Mitchell argues that the policy “denies girls the opportunity to race for college scouts who show up for elite tests, and to compete for the scholarships and opportunities that come with college recruitment.”

When colleges looked at my file, they didn’t see the fastest girl in Connecticut. They saw a runner in second or third place. ‘

She wrote, “I’ve lost four women’s league titles, two all-New England awards and countless other podium spots to male runners. I was bumped into third place in the 55-meter dash in 2019, behind two male runners. With every loss, it becomes more and more difficult to try again. ‘

But USA Today later updated the piece with a note that read, “ Editor’s Note: This column has been updated to reflect USA TODAY’s standards and style guidelines.

“We regret that offensive language has been used.”

Their version read, “I’ve lost four women’s league titles, two all-New England awards, and countless other places on the podium to transgender runners. I was bumped to third place in the 55-meter dash in 2019, behind two transgender runners. With every loss, it becomes more and more difficult to try again. ‘

Bloomfield High School transgender athlete Terry Miller, second from left, wins the final of the 55-meter dash over transgender athlete Andraya Yearwood, far left, and other runners in the Connecticut Girls Class S indoor track meet at Hillhouse High School in New Haven, Conn.

Bloomfield High School transgender athlete Terry Miller, second from left, wins the final of the 55-meter dash over transgender athlete Andraya Yearwood, far left, and other runners in the Connecticut Girls Class S indoor track meet at Hillhouse High School in New Haven, Conn.

Other sentences were changed from: ‘The CIAC allows biological men to compete in girls’ and women’s sports. As a result, two men started racing on the girls’ circuit in 2017.

In the 2017, 2018 and 2019 seasons alone, these men won 15 championship titles on the women’s circuit (titles in 2016 by nine different girls) and more than 85 opportunities to compete in higher-tier competitions that belonged to female track athletes. ‘

The USA Today version now says, “The CIAC enables transgender athletes to compete in girls’ and women’s sports. As a result, two transgender athletes started racing on the girls track in 2017.

“ In the 2017, 2018 and 2019 seasons alone, these runners won 15 women’s league title championships (titles in 2016 by nine different girls) and more than 85 opportunities to compete in higher-tier competitions that belonged to female track athletes. ”

President Joe Biden has signed an executive order to prevent and combat discrimination based on gender identity or sexual orientation, building on last year’s Supreme Court ruling, Bostock v. Clayton County. who protected LGBTQ people in the workplace.

‘It is impossible to discriminate against a person because he is homosexual or transgender without discriminating against that person on the basis of sex’, the court ruled.

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