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USA is 39th in the world when it comes to ‘flourishing’ of children and eighth WORST for sustainability

The United States is in 39th place in the world when it comes to ‘thriving’ children, who are lagging behind countries such as Saudi Arabia and Belarus, says a new report supported by the United Nations.

America is also in eighth worst place for sustainability when excess carbon emissions are taken into account, only beaten by countries such as Trinidad and Tobago and Qatar.

The new global index showed that children in Norway, South Korea and the Netherlands had the best chance of survival and well-being thanks to good healthcare, education and nutrition.

But it showed the US ranked lower than 38 other countries when it comes to the same indicators.

The ranking of countries by carbon emissions per capita places that and other rich countries, including the US and Australia, almost below that measure, as major contributors to global health threats due to climate change.

“Countries need to revise their approach to child and adolescent health to ensure that we not only care for our children today, but also protect the world that they will inherit in the future,” said former New Zealand Prime Minister Helen Clark, co-chair of the international committee that prepared the report.

The United States is in 39th place in the world when it comes to 'thriving' children, who are lagging behind countries such as Saudi Arabia and Belarus, says a new United Nations report

The United States is in 39th place in the world when it comes to ‘thriving’ children, who are lagging behind countries such as Saudi Arabia and Belarus, says a new United Nations report

The ranking of countries by carbon emissions per capita places that and other rich countries, including the US and Australia, almost below that measure, as major contributors to global health threats due to climate change

The ranking of countries by carbon emissions per capita places that and other rich countries, including the US and Australia, almost below that measure, as major contributors to global health threats due to climate change

The ranking of countries by carbon emissions per capita places that and other rich countries, including the US and Australia, almost below that measure, as major contributors to global health threats due to climate change

The ‘thriving’ part of the index measures countries on the geometric average of survival and prosperity.

Top ten countries are the United Kingdom, Ireland and Japan.

The report states: “The US is a higher income country (HIC) that is the 11th most unequal country in the world (among countries for which we have data on income inequality). In addition, the emerging rank of children in the US (39th) is also poor compared to many other HICs, and even some countries with an average income (MICs). ”

The ‘sustainability’ part of the index ranks countries according to how their emissions per person relate to a target for 2030, which gives a two-thirds chance of keeping the global average temperature rise to 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial times.

Of the top 25 countries with the best score on emissions, all but three were African.

This is in stark contrast to the ‘thriving’ part of the index, where many African countries performed poorly in the areas of children’s health, education, nutritious food and protection against violence.

No country performed well on all three measures of child prosperity, sustainability and fairness, concluded the committee convened by the World Heath Organization, the medical journal The Lancet and the UN children’s agency UNICEF.

Another major threat was exploitative marketing practices that push fast food, sugary drinks, alcohol and tobacco to children, increasingly through social media.

The report said dramatic progress has been made in improving children’s lives in the past five decades, but economic inequalities meant that the benefits were not shared by everyone.

And global warming and environmental damage, including stress, meant that every child was facing an uncertain future, it added.

No country performed well on all three measures for child prosperity, sustainability and fairness, concluded the committee convened by the World Heath Organization, the medical journal The Lancet and the UN children's agency UNICEF

No country performed well on all three measures of child rearing, sustainability and fairness, concluded the committee convened by the World Heath Organization, the medical journal The Lancet and the UN children's agency UNICEF

No country performed well on all three measures of child rearing, sustainability and fairness, concluded the committee convened by the World Heath Organization, the medical journal The Lancet and the UN children’s agency UNICEF

“Climate disruption causes extreme risks due to rising sea levels, extreme weather conditions, water and food insecurity, heat stress, emerging infectious diseases and large-scale population migration,” according to the report of more than 40 experts.

Commissioner Sunita Narain, Director General of the Center for Science and Environment, based in New Delhi, said that children’s health today “is at high risk due to environmental degradation.”

“The biggest inequality we have to face today is climate change inequality,” Narain said.

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