US Open winner Naomi Osaka says she felt she had to apologize for defeating Serena Williams

US Open winner Naomi Osaka said Monday she was still excited about her victory over Serena Williams and felt compelled to apologize for it after Williams' on-court drama with her referee eclipsed the victory.

US Open champion Naomi Osaka revealed on Monday that she is still excited about her victory over Serena Williams and felt compelled to apologize for it after the Williams fight with her referee eclipsed her victory.

Appearing on the Today show, Osaka, 20, apologized and said quietly that she "knew" that the court was encouraging her opponent and not her to win.

She said she was confused when Williams started yelling at referee Carlos Ramos after he gave him a series of fines, and he did not know if the crowd was really booing when they started booing.

"In my dreams, I won a very tough and competitive match, I felt very moved and I felt I had to apologize," he said, adding that he had not yet seen his match to determine if Williams' outburst was justified.

I did not really know what was going on because I went to the back and he turned his back on me. Then, before I knew it, he was saying there was a penalty in the game. I was a little confused by all this.

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US Open winner Naomi Osaka said Monday she was still excited about her victory over Serena Williams and felt compelled to apologize for it after Williams' on-court drama with her referee eclipsed the victory.

US Open winner Naomi Osaka said Monday she was still excited about her victory over Serena Williams and felt compelled to apologize for it after Williams' on-court drama with her referee eclipsed the victory.

"I felt a little sad, I was not sure if they were booing me or if it was because it was not the result they wanted," he said, referring to the crowd at the central court.

Osaka, who is half Haitian and half Japanese, continued: "I can sympathize. I've been a fan of Serena all my life. He knew how bad the crowd wanted him to win.

She has not seen her game yet, but is determined to decide for herself whether Williams or Ramos were right.

"I'm not 100% sure because I really have not had time to look at the news too much.

I've been going all over the place. I really can not form an opinion. I want to see everything and I want to know what happened.

"This is one of the greatest things that has happened to me," he said.

He thanked Williams for celebrating his victory during the trophy ceremony.

"She knew she was crying … everyone was upset there." She was saying some things that made me happy in general.

"In my dreams, I won a very tough and competitive match, I felt very excited and I felt I had to apologize.

Osaka, who represented Japan, went on to say that while his father was & # 39; great & # 39; With his victory, his mother was overwhelmed by emotion and pride.

"My parents said they were very proud of me, my mother cried a lot, my father is not, he's a great guy.

"I called my sister too and she was happy for me," he said.

The controversy on Williams' court began when Ramos quoted her as accepting Patrick Mouratoglou's training, which she denied.

Then he removed a point when she broke her racket in frustration after missing a shot.

That provoked his furious complaint where he called him a "sexist thief." Ramos took a game as punishment for "verbal abuse".

The incident has divided public opinion. Many athletes have lined up behind Williams to support her, saying she was justified in her description of Ramos as sexist because a male player would not have received the same severe penalties.

Osaka, 20, was shy when she said she had not yet had time to watch replay matches to decide if Williams was justified. The average Haitian and half-Japanese athlete joked that Saturday's final was "one of the most important things" that had happened in her life and that she was nervous because she had never been on a talk show before.

Osaka, 20, was shy when she said she had not yet had time to watch replay matches to decide if Williams was justified. The average Haitian and half-Japanese athlete joked that Saturday's final was "one of the most important things" that had happened in her life and that she was nervous because she had never been on a talk show before.

Osaka, 20, was shy when she said she had not yet had time to watch replay matches to decide if Williams was justified. The average Haitian and half-Japanese athlete joked that Saturday's final was "one of the most important things" that had happened in her life and that she was nervous because she had never been on a talk show before.

Others say that Ramos had the right to issue the violations and that he was simply having a tantrum.

His comments on Monday echoed the speech of his award-winning winner on Saturday when he said, in tears,

I've been going all over the place. I really can not form an opinion. I want to see everything and I want to know what happened.

& # 39; I know everyone was cheering her up and I feel like it's over like that. & # 39;

On Monday, Osaka said she had idolized Williams since she was a child, but did not intimidate her at the beginning of her departure.

"I was lucky to have played with her once in Miami." It did not feel so real because it was a grand slam this time.

"I saw her play in Grand Slam finals when she was a child, I felt really different when I entered this game, I was really nervous.

"I was going crazy a little, but when I went to the court, it really did not feel like Serena, it felt like she was another player.

Williams was fined $ 17,000 for her behavior during Saturday's final.

Williams came to blows with referee Carlos Ramos after he gave a coaching violation in the second set. It was the first of three infractions he would receive at the end of the final and eclipse the game. Williams argues that Ramos was sexist in his handling of the game

Williams came to blows with referee Carlos Ramos after he gave a coaching violation in the second set. It was the first of three infractions he would receive at the end of the final and eclipse the game. Williams argues that Ramos was sexist in his handling of the game

Williams came to blows with referee Carlos Ramos after he gave a coaching violation in the second set. It was the first of three infractions he would receive at the end of the final and eclipse the game. Williams argues that Ramos was sexist in his handling of the game

Osaka admitted that the victory was not the one she dreamed of but that it was beginning to "sink" & # 39;

Osaka admitted that the victory was not the one she dreamed of but that it was beginning to "sink" & # 39;

Osaka admitted that the victory was not the one she dreamed of but that it was beginning to "sink" & # 39;

It all started when Ramos accused her of accepting the training of Patrick Mouratoglou, who was in the crowd.

She argued with him and insisted that he had never cheated. Mouratoglou admitted since then that he was training but believes that Williams did not see him.

& # 39;[He] I treated her like a cheat, "she said." She felt completely humiliated, that's why she reacted like that, integrity is the most important thing to her, "she said.

When Williams lost a point in the second set, he broke his racket out of frustration.

Ramos imposed a fine and the decision triggered his deranged tirade towards him.

It was then that she called him a "thief" and accused him of sexism, saying he was being unfairly hard on her.

"I never received training." I explained to you that for you and to attack my character, then something is wrong.

You're attacking my character. Yes you are. You owe me an apology.

Osaka, 20, said he knew that "everyone" wanted Williams, 36, to win and that he felt guilty for succeeding. They are photographed at the trophy ceremony on Saturday where Osaka apologized for the outcome of his match

Osaka, 20, said he knew that "everyone" wanted Williams, 36, to win and that he felt guilty for succeeding. They are photographed at the trophy ceremony on Saturday where Osaka apologized for the outcome of his match

Osaka, 20, said he knew that "everyone" wanted Williams, 36, to win and that he felt guilty for succeeding. They are photographed at the trophy ceremony on Saturday where Osaka apologized for the outcome of his match

"Never, never, will you be in another court of mine while you live."

& # 39; You are the liar. When will you give me my apology? You owe me an apology

Say it, say you're sorry. Then do not talk to me, do not talk to me. How dare you imply that I was cheating? You stole a point. You are a thief too, "he said.

The outburst cost him a penalty of play and inflamed his fury even more. Osaka finally won 6-2 6-4.

Since then, experts have satirized Ramos for his behavior and tough stance. They say he took a game from Serena and robbed the crowd of a third set.

Williams' coach, Patrick Mouratoglou, said he was training her during the game, but she does not think she saw him. She stands up her argument that she was not cheating and undermines the referee's decision

Williams' coach, Patrick Mouratoglou, said he was training her during the game, but she does not think she saw him. She stands up her argument that she was not cheating and undermines the referee's decision

Williams' coach, Patrick Mouratoglou, said he was training her during the game, but she does not think she saw him. She stands up her argument that she was not cheating and undermines the referee's decision

The former US Open winner, Andy Roddick, tweeted: "Unfortunately I said worse things and I have never received a penalty per game."

She kept her comments at a post-match press conference in which she said: "I can not sit here and say I would not say he is a thief, because I thought he had taken a game from me.

"But I've seen other men call other arbitrators several things, I'm here fighting for women's rights and for women's equality.

"For me to say" thief "and for him to take a game, he made me feel that it was a sexist comment, he never took a man's game because they said" thief ".

& # 39; Leaves me speechless. I feel that the fact that I have to go through this is just an example for the next person who has emotions, and wants to express himself, and wants to be a strong woman.

& # 39; They will be allowed to do that for today. Maybe it did not work for me, but it's going to work for the next person. "

Tennis legend Billie Jean King, who won 12 Grand Slam titles, including four US Opens, was among those who jumped to support Williams as the dispute escalated.

"Several things went very wrong during the Women's Finals today," King said on Twitter.

& # 39; You must allow training at every point in tennis.

"It is not, and as a result, a player was penalized for the actions of his coach." This should not happen.

"When a woman is emotional, she is" hysterical "and is penalized for it.When a man does the same thing, he is" frank "and there are no repercussions.

& # 39; Thank you, @serenawilliams, for invoking this double standard. More voices are needed to do the same.

Victoria Azarenka, two times open winner of Australia and former world number 1, also supported Williams.

She tweeted: If it were a men's match, this would not happen like that. I just would not do it.

COMPLETE TRANSCRIPTION OF THE SERENA AND UMPIRE SURVEY

After being penalized for throwing his racket early in the second set:

& # 39; It's amazing. All the teams that I play here have problems.

"I did not receive training, I did not receive training, I did not receive training, you must make an announcement that I did not receive training, I do not cheat, I did not receive training, how can you say that?

You owe me an apology. You owe me an apology. I have never cheated in my life. I have a daughter and I defend what is right for her and I have never cheated. You owe me an apology.

After breaking to continue 4-3 in the second set:

"I never received training." I explained to you that for you and to attack my character, then something is wrong. You are attacking my character. Yes you are. You owe me an apology.

"Never, never, will you be in another court of mine while you live." You are the liar. When will you give me my apology? You owe me an apology.

Say it, say you're sorry. Then do not talk to me, do not talk to me. How dare you imply that I was cheating? You stole a point. You are a thief too.

After having landed a game:

& # 39; Are you kidding me? Are you kidding me? Because I said you were a thief? You stole a point. I'm not a cheater. I told you to apologize. Excuse me, I need the referee, I do not agree with that.

With the referees of the tournament:

& # 39; This is not right. INAUDIBLE. He said he was being trained but he was not being trained. That is not right. You already know how I am. You know my character. This is not fair. This has happened to me many times. This is not fair. Losing a game for saying that is not fair. Do you know how many men do things that are much worse than that? This is not fair.

"There are many men here who have said many things and, because they are men, they do not matter." Is incredible. No, I do not know the risk because if I say something simple, a thief, because he stole a point.

& # 39; There are men here who do much worse and because I am a woman you are going to take this away from me. That is not right. And you know it and I know you can not admit it, but I know you know that that's not right. I know you can not change it, but I'm just saying it's not right.

I receive the rules, but I'm just saying that it's not right. It happens to me in this tournament every year and it's not fair. That is all I have to say.

Post-match press conference:

"I can not sit here and say I would not say he is a thief, because I thought he had taken a game from me.

"But I've seen other men call other arbitrators various things, I'm here fighting for women's rights and for women's equality and for all kinds of things, for me to say 'thief' and for he took a game, he made me feel like it was a sexist comment, he never took a game from a man because they said "thief." It leaves me speechless

"I feel that the fact that I have to go through this is just an example for the next person who has emotions, and wants to express himself, and wants to be a strong woman.

& # 39; They will be allowed to do that for today. Maybe it did not work for me, but it's going to work for the next person. "

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