US military investigates ‘directed energy’ systems using lasers to form ‘force field’ over US VS

The United States Air Force is investigating direct energy (DE) technologies that they hope can turn energy beams into a force field that can be used to destroy enemy missiles.

In a new report entitled “Focused Energy Futures 2060,DE is described as ‘a focused beam of electromagnetic energy used to enable or create military effects, when used in conjunction with other military systems, including kinetic weapons.’

These can be lasers, radio frequency devices, powerful microwaves, millimeter waves and particle beams, all of which can create at least five military effects: “deny, deteriorate, damage, destroy or cheat.”

The report suggests the force field would be created by trucks or satellites equipped with lasers or other systems, which could potentially be used to form a dome-like, invisible barrier across the country.

Any enemy missile or aircraft attempting to penetrate that force field would be destroyed by coming into contact with those high-energy jets.

In a press release sent to The rideJeremy Murray-Krezan, the Directed Energy Deputy Chief Scientist at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), adds that current directed energy technology is “not quite Star Wars,” but adds that the AFRL “is getting close.” ‘ – the Star Wars movies have glowing energy shields that protect troops, machines and spacecraft.

The US Air Force is developing 'directed energy' (DE) technologies to create a force field over military vehicles or even the entire US that would deflect incoming enemy weapons - and the innovation could be ready by 2060

The US Air Force is developing ‘directed energy’ (DE) technologies to create a force field over military vehicles or even the entire US that would deflect incoming enemy weapons – and the innovation could be ready by 2060

“By 2060, we can predict that DE systems will become more effective, and this idea of ​​a force field includes methods to destroy other threats,” Murray-Krezan shared in the press release.

“Ultimately, there may be potential to reach the penultimate target of a nuclear or ballistic missile umbrella.

“It’s fun to think about what that might be in 2060, but we don’t want to speculate too much.”

DailyMail.com has reached out to AFRL for more information on its DE system.

The report suggests the force field would be created by trucks or satellites (concept image) equipped with lasers or other systems, which would form a dome-like, invisible barrier across the country.

The report suggests the force field would be created by trucks or satellites (concept image) equipped with lasers or other systems, which would form a dome-like, invisible barrier across the country.

The report suggests the force field would be created by trucks or satellites (concept image) equipped with lasers or other systems, which would form a dome-like, invisible barrier across the country.

The report notes that DE systems currently play an important military role worldwide, in that they are already used in air defense, target identification, tracking, counterintelligence search and reconnaissance (ISR) and electronic warfare (EW).

However, for the technology to produce a powerful force field by 2060, particle beams, lasers and other systems must propagate “militarily relevant distances,” the report said, suggesting they need to be turbocharged to make them effective over longer distances.

“Electron beams are currently considered the most likely military application, although due to technological limitations, propagation is now only poorly achieved in the Earth’s atmosphere,” the report continues.

“Militarily relevant systems are currently limited to less than a few hundred meters of effective range.”

Once the technology is capable of reaching greater distances, AFRL proposes placing the force field at altitudes above 30,000 feet “where human exposure is less likely.”

Once the technology is capable of reaching greater distances, AFRL proposes placing the force field at altitudes above 30,000 feet where human exposure is less likely.  Pictured is a Multi-Mission High Energy Laser (MMHEL) prototype aboard a US Army Stryker Infantry Carrier Vehicle

Once the technology is capable of reaching greater distances, AFRL proposes placing the force field at altitudes above 30,000 feet where human exposure is less likely.  Pictured is a Multi-Mission High Energy Laser (MMHEL) prototype aboard a US Army Stryker Infantry Carrier Vehicle

Once the technology is capable of reaching greater distances, AFRL proposes placing the force field at altitudes above 30,000 feet where human exposure is less likely. Pictured is a Multi-Mission High Energy Laser (MMHEL) prototype aboard a US Army Stryker Infantry Carrier Vehicle

In a press release, Jeremy Murray-Krezan, Directed Energy Deputy Chief Scientist of the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), adds that current directed energy technology “isn’t quite Star Wars,” but adds that the AFRL “is getting close.” ‘

Not only does the report outline how AFRL would develop the technology, but it also urges officials to get behind the innovation in the interest of the nation.

“There is no guarantee that US military personnel will be members of the most technologically advanced military in future conflicts,” the report said.

“DEWs are currently being developed rapidly and are spreading around the world, and DE is regarded worldwide as a pioneering military technology.”

In addition, peer competitors, rogue, terrorist and criminal organizations are expected to continue to own similar DEWs that can degrade, disrupt, deny, damage and even destroy equipment.

Therefore, the US must invest in technologies to at least maintain equality in DE territories, including countermeasures to amplify known vulnerabilities in the event of a high-end conflict or terrorist-style 9/11 attack in DE. ‘

United States officials are lagging behind in the DE movement, as other countries are already using similar technologies on the battlefield — and Israel is one of them.

The country has been using its Iron Dome since 2011, an anti-missile system that uses radar technology and interceptors (missiles) to track and destroy incoming missiles.

Iron Dome is constantly looking for incoming missiles, and when one is detected, the information is processed and sent to the missile battery system.

Information about the speed and trajectory of the incoming missile is used to target an interceptor at it.

Its interceptor locks onto the incoming missile and explodes if it gets very close, destroying the missile in mid-air.

The Iron Dome can detect missiles from 3.8 miles to 70.4 miles away.

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