US health officials are monitoring 27 people for Ebola for fear they contracted it in West Africa

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Four people in Oregon and 23 in Washington are being checked for the Ebola virus after returning to the US from West Africa, the Oregon Health Authority said Thursday.

The individuals had returned from Guinea and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, where minor outbreaks of Ebola have been recorded.

The state health authority said the four people, who returned to the US in early March, had been in contact with state and local public health services, as had the 23 in Washington.

Health officials say the risk of one in four contracting the virus is low, but the CDC has mandated that anyone returning from areas with an active outbreak should be monitored for symptoms of the deadly disease for 21 days.

Monitoring will help determine each risk factor of exposure and ensure their safety, as well as the safety of their families and the community.

Four people in Oregon are being checked for the Ebola virus after returning to the US from West Africa, the Oregon Health Authority said Thursday (photo, health workers visited an Ebola patient in July 2019)

Four people in Oregon are being checked for the Ebola virus after returning to the US from West Africa, the Oregon Health Authority said Thursday (photo, health workers visited an Ebola patient in July 2019)

Symptoms can occur between 2 and 21 days after contact with an infected person or animal, but are likely to appear between 8 and 10 days after contact (photo: Guinean health workers prepare to administer Ebola vaccines after an outbreak)

Symptoms can occur between 2 and 21 days after contact with an infected person or animal, but are likely to appear between 8 and 10 days after contact (photo: Guinean health workers prepare to administer Ebola vaccines after an outbreak)

Symptoms can occur between 2 and 21 days after contact with an infected person or animal, but are likely to appear between 8 and 10 days after contact (photo: Guinean health workers prepare to administer Ebola vaccines after an outbreak)

Chief Medical Officer for Health Security, Preparedness and Response at the OHA Public Health Division Richard Leman said, “ We want to ensure that these individuals receive the support they need to monitor their health, stay in touch with public health officials and provide safe assistance. to get from medical services when it comes down to it ‘.

Ebola can be contracted from the exchange of blood or bodily fluids in direct, intimate contact.

Symptoms can appear between 2 and 21 days after contact with an infected person or animal, but are likely to appear between 8 and 10 days after contact.

The first symptoms, known as ‘dry’ symptoms, are fever, aches, pains and fatigue.

‘Wet’ symptoms, including diarrhea and vomiting, develop later as the person becomes unwell.

A person would have to be symptomatic, for example with a high fever, to transmit it.

The 2014-2016 Ebola outbreak claimed more than 11,000 lives as it swept across West Africa (pictured, Libera pays tribute to those who died of Ebola during the 2014 outbreak)

The 2014-2016 Ebola outbreak claimed more than 11,000 lives as it swept across West Africa (pictured, Libera pays tribute to those who died of Ebola during the 2014 outbreak)

The 2014-2016 Ebola outbreak claimed more than 11,000 lives as it swept across West Africa (pictured, Libera pays tribute to those who died of Ebola during the 2014 outbreak)

Health officials say the risk of one in four contracting the virus is low.  But they will still be monitored to determine any exposure risk factors and to ensure their safety, as well as the safety of their families and the community.

Health officials say the risk of one in four contracting the virus is low.  But they will still be monitored to determine any exposure risk factors and to ensure their safety, as well as the safety of their families and the community.

Health officials say the risk of one in four contracting the virus is low. But they will still be monitored to determine any exposure risk factors and to ensure their safety, as well as the safety of their families and the community.

Health officials believe the outbreak is the result of a survivor of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa in 2014.

The six-year incubation period may mark the longest time a virus has existed after the initial outbreak, Fox10 reported.

On March 24, Guinea had reported 18 cases and nine deaths related to the Ebola outbreak first reported in January.

Guinea launched a vaccination campaign against Ebola on February 23, 2021, after the new outbreak of the deadly disease hit the country.

Officials hope the virus can be eradicated within six weeks.

Following this latest outbreak, the World Health Organization (WHO) has sent more than 30,000 vaccines to Guinea (photo: woman receives Ebola vaccine in DRC)

Following this latest outbreak, the World Health Organization (WHO) has sent more than 30,000 vaccines to Guinea (photo: woman receives Ebola vaccine in DRC)

Following this latest outbreak, the World Health Organization (WHO) has sent more than 30,000 vaccines to Guinea (photo: woman receives Ebola vaccine in DRC)

The international organization has also arranged a shipment of vaccines and additional therapeutic support to the DRC (photo: a health worker administering an Ebola vaccine to a boy in the DRC)

The international organization has also arranged a shipment of vaccines and additional therapeutic support to the DRC (photo: a health worker administering an Ebola vaccine to a boy in the DRC)

The international organization has also arranged a shipment of vaccines and additional therapeutic support to the DRC (photo: a health worker administering an Ebola vaccine to a boy in the DRC)

Guinea launched a vaccination campaign against Ebola on February 23, 2021, after the new outbreak of the deadly disease hit the country.

Guinea launched a vaccination campaign against Ebola on February 23, 2021, after the new outbreak of the deadly disease hit the country.

Guinea launched a vaccination campaign against Ebola on February 23, 2021, after the new outbreak of the deadly disease hit the country.

Officials hope the virus can be eradicated within six weeks (photo, the emergency stop at N'zerekore hospital, where Guinea's first Ebola cases from this new outbreak were found)

Officials hope the virus can be eradicated within six weeks (photo, the emergency stop at N'zerekore hospital, where Guinea's first Ebola cases from this new outbreak were found)

Officials hope the virus can be eradicated within six weeks (photo, the emergency stop at N’zerekore hospital, where Guinea’s first Ebola cases from this new outbreak were found)

The Democratic Republic of Congo has reported 12 Ebola cases and six Ebola-related deaths since the 12th outbreak of the virus in February.

Although rare, Ebola can be deadly if not treated quickly.

The 2014-2016 Ebola outbreak claimed more than 11,000 lives as it crossed West Africa.

Following this latest outbreak, the World Health Organization (WHO) has sent more than 30,000 vaccines to Guinea.

The international organization has also organized a shipment of vaccines and additional therapeutic support to the DRC.

Following this latest outbreak, the World Health Organization (WHO) has sent more than 30,000 vaccines to Guinea.  The international organization has also organized a shipment of vaccines and additional therapeutic support to the DRC

Following this latest outbreak, the World Health Organization (WHO) has sent more than 30,000 vaccines to Guinea.  The international organization has also organized a shipment of vaccines and additional therapeutic support to the DRC

Following this latest outbreak, the World Health Organization (WHO) has sent more than 30,000 vaccines to Guinea. The international organization has also organized a shipment of vaccines and additional therapeutic support to the DRC

WHAT IS EBOLA AND HOW DEATH IS IT?

Ebola, a hemorrhagic fever, killed at least 11,000 people around the world after it decimated West Africa and spread quickly over the span of two years.

That pandemic was officially declared in January 2016, when Liberia was announced by the WHO as Ebola-free.

The country, shaken by civil wars that ended in 2003, was hit hardest by the fever, with 40 percent of the deaths there.

Sierra Leone reported the highest number of Ebola cases, with almost all infected people living in the country.

WHERE DID IT BEGIN?

An analysis published in the New England Journal of Medicine found the outbreak started in Guinea – which borders Liberia and Sierra Leone.

A team of international researchers was able to trace the pandemic back to a two-year-old boy in Meliandou – about 650 kilometers from the capital, Conakry.

More commonly known as Patient Zero, Emile Ouamouno may have contracted the deadly virus from playing with bats in a hollow tree, a study suggested.

Health workers are caring for an Ebola patient to be held in an isolation tent in the Democratic Republic of Congo in July 2019

Health workers are caring for an Ebola patient to be held in an isolation tent in the Democratic Republic of Congo in July 2019

Health workers are caring for an Ebola patient to be held in an isolation tent in the Democratic Republic of Congo in July 2019

Figures show that nearly 29,000 people have been infected by Ebola – meaning the virus has killed about 40 percent of people.

Cases and deaths were also reported in Nigeria, Mali and the US, but on a much smaller scale, with 15 fatalities between the three countries.

Health officials in Guinea reported a mysterious bug in the southeastern regions of the country before WHO confirmed it was Ebola.

Ebola was first identified by scientists in 1976, but the most recent outbreak eclipsed all others recorded in history, figures show.

HOW DO PEOPLE HAVE THE VIRUS CONTRACT?

Scientists believe Ebola is most often passed on to humans by fruit bats, but antelopes, porcupines, gorillas and chimpanzees may also be to blame.

It can be transmitted between people through blood, secretions, and other bodily fluids from people – and surfaces – that are infected.

IS THERE A TREATMENT?

The WHO warns there is “no proven cure” for Ebola – but dozens of drugs and injections are being tested in the event of an equally devastating outbreak.

However, there is hope, the US FDA approved the Ervebo vaccine for use against the Ebola virus in December 2019.