US citizens and Afghan allies have just 72 hours to evacuate, claims former CIA officer

US citizens and Afghan allies have just 72 hours before the evacuations from Kabul end, a former CIA officer and terrorism expert claimed.

Sam Faddis, head of the Counter Terrorism Center’s mass destruction unit, said Pentagon sources, military officers in Kabul and other former intelligence officers have told him that flights for civilians from the Afghan capital will actually stop in the coming months. three days.

The alleged deadline has not been officially announced or verified, but raises concerns that American citizens could be left behind in the Taliban-occupied city.

On Tuesday, President Joe Biden confirmed that US troops will leave the country on August 31, a date agreed with the Taliban, but Faddis claims US citizens currently in the city have a much shorter deadline.

Biden has decided that we will withdraw within 72 hours. We’re gone, and it doesn’t matter who’s still on the ground,” the ex-CIA agent told DailyMail.com.

US citizens and Afghan allies have three days to flee Kabul before evacuation efforts end, a former CIA officer and terrorism expert claimed. Pictured: Members of the US Air Force escort evacuees aboard a US plane on Tuesday

Crowds of people wait outside the airport in Kabul, Afghanistan as the clock ticks to freedom on Wednesday

Crowds of people wait outside the airport in Kabul, Afghanistan as the clock ticks to freedom on Wednesday

“People in Kabul are telling them everything will be shut down in 72 hours. I assume that means civilian evacuation flights end in 72 hours.

“Because it takes some time to get the troops and their equipment out. They have to collapse on their own to maintain some sort of security perimeter.

The word is, it doesn’t matter to American citizens. Because there is no hard workforce.’

Former CIA officer Sam Faddis told DailyMail.com that Pentagon and Kabul sources said flights for civilians from the Afghan capital will end in the next three days

Former CIA officer Sam Faddis told DailyMail.com that Pentagon and Kabul sources said flights for civilians from the Afghan capital will end in the next three days

Top generals have refused to disclose the exact number of US citizens remaining in Kabul at press conferences and briefings to lawmakers, simply saying it is “thousands.”

“What I am constantly being told, and have been told for many days, is that any idea that this is conditional is wrong,” added Faddis. “We’re leaving, anyone who isn’t gone will be cut off.

“Every time I say it, I find it baffling to even hear myself say it, but apparently it’s true. We’re just leaving.’

Faddis took the first CIA team to Iraq before the 2003 invasion and wrote a book about his experiences at the agency, Beyond Repair: The Decline and Fall of the CIA.

In an exclusive interview with DailyMail.com on Tuesday, he claimed that defense officials also told him that Biden had rejected an alternative evacuation plan, even after being warned that Kabul International Airport could not be defended if attacked.

Faddis said officials from the 18th Airborne Corps have suggested that US troops recapture Bagram Air Force Base, about 30 miles north of Kabul, which was abandoned in July due to limited numbers of US troops and turned on August 15 by Afghan forces to the Taliban. surrendered.

“The original plan of the 18th Airborne Corps at Fort Bragg was that there was only one rational way to do this,” he said.

“We need to recapture Bagram and establish a real operations base in a defensible location with multiple runways that will allow us to fly our own aircraft.

President Biden said on Tuesday the US is on track to complete evacuations from Afghanistan by the August 31 deadline.  However, Faddis claims that the president has decided to pull everyone out within three days

President Biden said on Tuesday the US is on track to complete evacuations from Afghanistan by the August 31 deadline. However, Faddis claims that the president has decided to pull everyone out within three days

Afghan families are pictured boarding a military evacuation flight at Hamid Karzai Airport on Tuesday as the US prepares to withdraw from the country, with other Western countries to follow.

Afghan families are pictured boarding a military evacuation flight at Hamid Karzai Airport on Tuesday as the US prepares to withdraw from the country, with other Western countries to follow.

‘Several people have told me this was the plan, the only rational plan and the answer’ [from the White House] was ‘that won’t happen’.

“The idea of ​​deploying more troops, retaking Bagram, was just completely ruled out.”

Faddis claimed Bagram had been fired despite senior military officials having informed the White House against using Kabul’s civilian airport, Hamid Karzai International, as a base because of the vulnerability of US forces when attacked by the Taliban.

“With regard to Kabul International Airport, it was made very clear that it is a totally unfeasible military solution to begin with, because it is a militarily indefensible position,” Faddis said.

“It’s a small perimeter on a single runway, surrounded by high ground with potentially tens of thousands of enemy fighters approaching.

“The only supply is through that one runway, and that runway can be essentially rendered useless if the enemy decides to fire missiles and artillery at the runway.”

Faddis said Biden had been told, “You are putting our troops on the ground in a position we cannot hold if challenged.”

“The military has explicitly told him that this is not a viable military option, meaning if you do this unless we are extremely lucky we will lose very badly and be very lucky if we ever see any of our people again.” . That translates into US military language,” he said.

Pentagon press secretary John Kirby rejected the idea of ​​retaking Bagram Air Base in Afghanistan when journalists questioned him on Monday, calling the plan a

Pentagon press secretary John Kirby rejected the idea of ​​retaking Bagram Air Base in Afghanistan when journalists questioned him on Monday, calling the plan a “spend of resources.”

Faddis said officials from the 18th Airborne Corps suggested US troops recapture Bagram Air Force Base (pictured) about 30 miles north of Kabul, but the idea was reportedly rejected by the White House.

Faddis said officials from the 18th Airborne Corps suggested US troops recapture Bagram Air Force Base (pictured) about 30 miles north of Kabul, but the idea was reportedly rejected by the White House.

“Biden made that decision knowing that he was putting a US force in a position he possibly knew he wouldn’t even be sure of getting the troops out of — forget the American civilians in Kabul.”

Pentagon press secretary John Kirby rejected the idea of ​​retaking Bagram when journalists questioned him on Monday.

“What you’re talking about would be a spending of resources and personnel, as well as an increase that most likely threatens them to try to go back and…recapture Bagram Air Base, which is the size of a small town.” ,’ he said.

“It was closed as part of the retrograde. It always had to be closed as part of the retrograde. It was the last base to be handed over to the Afghans.’

Kirby declined to comment to reporters about the alleged 82nd Airborne Division that rejected the proposal to seize the airbase.

A military contractor who spoke to DailyMail.com on condition of anonymity said he was asked by the DoD to search for pilots and planes to evacuate civilians from Kabul.

He claimed he was also told by sources in Kabul that the deadline for the evacuation of civilians was fast approaching and would be much earlier than the Taliban’s August 31 lockdown for all US troops.

“They’re talking about uniformed military personnel by the 31st, and they’re giving a shorter deadline for all non-military civilians,” he said.

The contractor added that senior government officials have scrapped the job after preparing pilots and making planes available to evacuate the thousands waiting in Kabul for rescue.

“We have been approached to provide planes for the airlift to get people out,” he said. “We delivered a bunch of planes and then were not cleared to land. Go figure.

“Two weeks ago the US military came to me and said, ‘Can you find planes and pilots who want to fly to Kabul?’

‘I said ‘Yes, no problem.’ The next day I was on it. We said we could get so many planes, carry so many packages, that they would be willing to fly in them.

“They said okay, we’ll get the clearance. They went back to get the permissions and they were told no.’

.