Categories: Science

US Army tests DRONES to deliver blood and medical supplies in dangerous battlefield situations

The US Army tested drones to deliver medical supplies during dangerous battlefield scenarios to wounded warriors.

During a recent US-led training exercise in California with militaries from other nations, drones dropped simulated blood and other crucial medical supplies on soldiers as part of Project Crimson. This type of technology would be deployed in circumstances where it would not be safe to send people on foot for help.

The drone is a vertical take-off and landing aircraft, so it doesn’t need a runway or catapult launch to perform these lifesaving missions, according to the Army.

That feature allows soldiers to preserve life early on immediately after an injury and helps facilitate transport to an Army hospital.

The US Army tested drones to deliver medical supplies during dangerous battlefield scenarios to wounded warriors

During a recent US-led training exercise in California with militaries from other nations, drones dropped simulated blood and other crucial medical supplies on soldiers as part of Project Crimson.

Such a drone can allow soldiers to preserve life in the initial phase immediately after an injury and help facilitate transport to an Army hospital.

“Project Crimson is a project to take a common unmanned aerial system and adapt it to support a medical mission,” said Nathan Fisher, chief of the Medical Robotics and Autonomous Systems division at the Army Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center. USA, in a statement.

“This drone supports field medical care when casualty evacuation is not an option. You can keep whole blood and other crucial items chilled in the self-contained portable refrigeration unit and take it to medics in the field with wounded warriors.’

The Army used a FVR-90 L3Harris Technologies drone for Project Crimson.

In flight, the craft flies as a fixed-wing aircraft for 12 to 18 hours, can operate from land and sea, and had a payload capacity of up to 22 pounds.

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Researchers at Johns Hopkins University first demonstrated that blood could be delivered by drone in 2015. A study in the April 2022 issue of Lancet Global Health showed that drone blood delivery in rural and mountainous regions of Africa was fast and safe.

In addition to drones, the Army also tested a range of other remote communication and diagnostic tools for use on the battlefield.

“This drone supports field medical care when casualty evacuation is not an option. You can keep whole blood and other crucial items chilled in the self-contained portable refrigeration unit and take it to medics in the field with wounded warriors.

In flight, the craft flies as a fixed-wing aircraft for 12 to 18 hours, can operate from land and sea, and had a payload capacity of up to 22 pounds.

One such tool is called the Battlefield Assisted Trauma Distributed Observation Kit (BATDOK), which is a smartphone app that can also work with sensors placed on patients to scan vital signs and other information and then store it on the device.

That information would then be shared with other devices, via wi-fi or Bluetooth, giving doctors in the field a simple way to transfer patient health information to the transfer point.

“The facility can view patient status in real time using BATDOK, while medics on the ground can also update treatments and medications for patients,” explained Michael Sedillo, director of integrated cockpit screening program aviator systems with Air Force Research. Laboratory, in a statement.

“This allows the facility to be alert, assemble and prepare to treat the patient once they are transported,” he added.

“The ability to have these technologies on hand has greatly improved medical care in the field,” said Capt. Morgan Plowman, a medic with the 15th Brigade Support Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division.

‘Taking up a tablet or phone to enter staff data has increased communication in the future and the accuracy of field care. So much so that the rate of patient care has increased to the point that care for a victim from start to finish has been dramatically sped up.’

Researchers at Johns Hopkins University first demonstrated that a drone could deliver blood in 2015.

Jacky

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