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Urgent warning issued over deadly grey cannisters that have washed up on Australian beaches

Urgent warning issued over deadly gray jerry cans washed up on Australian beaches – so what exactly are they?

  • Urgent warning issued as gray murder bottles wash up on the shores of QLD
  • Ballina Shire Council shared the warning on their social media
  • Tangaroa Blue Foundation Says Four Deadly Bottles Have Been Found in QLD This Year

An urgent warning has been issued about toxic gray bottles that have washed up on Australian beaches in recent years.

Yesterday Ballina Shire Council said they had been contacted by the NSW Department of Primary Industries who asked them to share information about dangerous gray canisters publicly due to recent wild weather events that could have caused them to wash up on the beach.

The unmarked silver jerry cans are said to be filled with aluminum phosphide, a toxic combination of chemicals that are deadly if ingested or inhaled, and are used in fumigation aboard ships, usually for pest control.

Tangaroa Blue Foundation, a non-profit charity dedicated to removing and preventing marine debris, says these deadly buses have been washing up on beaches since 2012, and four have washed up on beaches along the Queensland coast this year alone.

Despite sharing the infographic, Ballina Shire Council says they have not received any reports of these containers on their local beaches or coasts.

Ballina Shire Council urges residents to watch out for dangerous silver jerry cans that wash up on beaches.

Ballina Shire Council urges residents to watch out for dangerous silver jerry cans that wash up on beaches.

Tangaroa Blue says four of these containers have washed up on Queensland beaches this year

Tangaroa Blue says four of these containers have washed up on Queensland beaches this year

What to do if you find one?

1. DO NOT TOUCH IT!

2. Stand up straight to avoid possible inhalation

3. Mark the area with chopsticks and brightly coated tape

4. Immediately notify a cleanup coordinator

5. Call 000

In May, Queensland Fire reported that a jerry can washed up on a beach in the Whitsundays.

In a Facebook post, they said: ‘This canister, which contained aluminum phosphide pellets, was found in the Whitsundays after widespread heavy rain in central Queensland. When exposed to moisture, it produces flammable and toxic phosphine gas that can be incredibly dangerous or even fatal to anyone who comes into contact with it.”

“If you see something like that, NEVER touch it. Often, as with this canister, the shell can be broken and toxic fumes can already be released’

If any of these bottles are found, it is critical not to touch them, stand upwind to avoid possible inhalation and immediately dial 000.

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