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Uproar after six WA bikie prisoners granted permission to watch Champions League final

Outrage over VIP cycling inmates being allowed to watch a major football final from one of the country’s safest prisons

  • Bikie inmates get permission to watch Champions League final
  • Took place at Wooroloo Prison Farm in Western Australia on May 29
  • Six inmates gathered in a common room at 2:30 am to watch the match
  • No other inmates were allowed to watch the match as part of the scheme
  • Some employees believed the event violated Covid-19 protocols
  • WA Prison Officers’ Union said it raised concerns about double standards

A handful of cycling inmates in Western Australia were treated like VIPs when they got to watch this year’s UEFA Champions League final from one of the safest prisons in the country.

The Wooroloo Prison Farm inmate and former WA commander of the Comancheros, Steve “Shorty” Milenkovski, is said to have requested prison authorities to watch the game.

Milenkovski has been jailed for 17 years for leading a drug operation that attempted to smuggle $3.8 million worth of meth into Perth.

Six inmates gathered in a communal area at Wooroloo Prison Farm around 2.30am on May 29 to watch the blockbuster encounter between Liverpool and Real Madrid (pictured)

Six inmates gathered in a communal area at Wooroloo Prison Farm around 2.30am on May 29 to watch the blockbuster encounter between Liverpool and Real Madrid (pictured)

Wooroloo Prison Farm inmate and former state commander of the Comancheros, Steve 'Shorty' Milenkovski (pictured left) has reportedly requested prison authorities to allow the viewing

Wooroloo Prison Farm inmate and former state commander of the Comancheros, Steve ‘Shorty’ Milenkovski (pictured left) has reportedly requested prison authorities to allow the viewing

The six inmates gathered in a communal area around 2:30 a.m. on May 29 so they could watch the blockbuster encounter between Liverpool and Real Madrid. The Western Australian reported.

The guards were ordered to have the prisoners back in their units by 5:30 a.m.

As part of the arrangement, no other inmates were allowed outside to watch the match.

However, some of the staff were uncomfortable with the viewing due to concerns it was violating Covid-19 protocols.

The Ministry of Justice of Western Australia denied that this was the case.

Among those in attendance was Robert Zanon, who is serving six years in a 14-year prison term for supplying 8.75 kg of meth.

Some Wooroloo Prison Farm employees (pictured) were uncomfortable watching it over concerns it was violating Covid-19 protocols

Some Wooroloo Prison Farm employees (pictured) were uncomfortable watching it over concerns it was violating Covid-19 protocols

Zanon was a courier in a syndicate headed by drug dealer Marc Quaid.

Another in attendance was Luke Edward Noormets, nominee for a rebel biker, who kidnapped and beat a man before dousing him in gasoline, setting him on fire and putting water on board a house in 2017.

Inmate Omar Hussein, who was serving time for attempting to smuggle 9.5 million cigarettes into WA, also saw the match.

“These detainees were in a separate unit, night staff were notified of the clearance, the detainees did not leave the unit and there were no recorded incidents,” a department spokesman said.

Andy Smith, the secretary of the WA prison officers, said there were concerns about double standards.

He believed that the main problem is the inconsistency of the treatment of prisoners.

“This gives other inmates the impression that the prison is actually run by criminal elements in the prison rather than the prison management.”

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