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Unlucky-in-love woman, 40, embarks on motherhood alone

Unhappy woman, 40, embarks on motherhood alone after her six-year-old husband decides he doesn’t want kids

  • Katie Bryan, from Texas, divorced her husband after he didn’t want children
  • She tried dating again, but soon decided to freeze her eggs and get a transplant
  • Mrs Bryan then welcomed her son Miles in his late 30s after finding a sperm donor

A woman who dreamed of becoming a parent only embarked on motherhood after her six-year-old husband decided he didn’t want children.

Katie Bryan, 40, of Austin, Texas, married at age 23 and thought she had enough time to start a family — but divorced at 29 when her partner decided he didn’t want kids.

The school board later decided to freeze her eggs—and soon stopped looking for a new partner and considered single parenthood instead.

She became pregnant with her son Miles after an embryo transfer shortly afterwards.

Katie Bryan, 40, of Austin, Texas, married at age 23 and thought she had enough time to start a family — but divorced at 29 when her partner decided he didn't want kids

Katie Bryan, 40, of Austin, Texas, married at age 23 and thought she had enough time to start a family — but divorced at 29 when her partner decided he didn’t want kids

Ms Bryan said: ‘I felt smug when I got married at 23, I was young, I was married and I had a house, which meant I would have children in the next few years, but then we divorced six years later. like him’ I don’t want kids.

“I thought I would go ahead and have a better date, but it never happened. My ex-husband had set the bar high and I couldn’t find anyone I’d like to start a family with.

“As I got older I realized I wouldn’t have much time to figure out if they were right or not, I didn’t want to just have a kid with someone I didn’t know for so long and I started to figure out where I was. don’t want a baby with a stranger.

“So I decided to go on as many dates as I could.

“It got to a stage where I was working up to three a week and finally found someone at 38, and decided I was going to freeze my eggs because I expected the relationship to progress.

“The relationship broke down and I was in a position where I needed a baby as soon as my window closed, but the only way to find out how strong my eggs were was to fertilize them, but I didn’t have a partner for this. ‘

The school board quickly decided to freeze her eggs - and soon stopped looking for a new partner and decided to have an embryo transfer instead

The school board quickly decided to freeze her eggs – and soon stopped looking for a new partner and decided to have an embryo transfer instead

She became pregnant with her son Miles (pictured above with Katie) shortly after.

She became pregnant with her son Miles (pictured above with Katie) shortly after.

Ms. Bryan first tried intrauterine insemination (IUI) – a type of artificial insemination – but miscarried.

She then consulted a fertility specialist and decided that an embryo transfer was the best option.

“I had a donor and I got pregnant after some very successful egg collections at the age of 39,” she said.

“It cost me about £7,000 in total, including medicine. It’s not cheap, but being a mother is worth it, and if I chose a car or a baby, I’d choose a baby every day.”

Mrs. Bryan said her son, Miles, already knows how he was born.

Ms Bryan first tried intrauterine insemination (IUI) - a type of artificial insemination - but miscarried

Ms Bryan first tried intrauterine insemination (IUI) – a type of artificial insemination – but miscarried

She then consulted a fertility specialist and decided that an embryo transfer was the best option

She then consulted a fertility specialist and decided that an embryo transfer was the best option

“It’s not something we’re tiptoeing around, and I really believe that although he has questions and feelings about it, it shouldn’t be a problem,” she says.

“We just don’t have a father in our family. We don’t have a pony either. It’s just not something that’s in the game for us right now, maybe someday.”

The mother of one said she chose an “open ID donor” so she could access his background and photos.

This will be shared with Miles when he is older – and has met her son and even the donor.

She said: “He’s even met my son and keeps up to date with what we’re doing, which makes it easier for Miles when he’s older because he doesn’t have all these questions, he can just ask the donor himself.

“So for now, while he’s around, I decided it was best not to make a big deal of it, but just let Miles know as he gets older.”

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