United Airlines Announces Deal to Buy 15 Supersonic Aircraft from Denver’s Boom Supersonic

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United Airlines has announced a deal to buy 1300mph supersonic planes in a move it says represents “a leap forward in bringing supersonic speeds back to aviation.”

United said it would buy 15 ‘Overture’ aircraft from Denver-based aerospace company Boom Supersonic to add to its global fleet, with an option for an additional 35 aircraft.

Overture is expected to be rolled out in 2025, flying in 2026 and expected to carry passengers by 2029.

United said it would buy 15 'Overture' aircraft (viewed above) from Denver-based aerospace company Boom Supersonic to add to its global fleet, with an option for an additional 35 aircraft.

United said it would buy 15 ‘Overture’ aircraft (viewed above) from Denver-based aerospace company Boom Supersonic to add to its global fleet, with an option for an additional 35 aircraft.

Capable of flying at speeds of Mach 1.7 — twice the speed of today’s fastest planes — Overture, United said, “can connect more than 500 destinations in almost half the time.”

It continued: ‘Among the many future potential routes for United are Newark to London in just three and a half hours, Newark to Frankfurt in four hours and San Francisco to Tokyo in just six hours. Overture will also be designed with features such as in-seat entertainment screens, ample personal space and contactless technology.”

United added that the Overture is expected to be the first major commercial aircraft to be carbon-free from day one, optimized to run on 100 percent sustainable aviation fuel (SAF).

“The world’s first net-zero carbon dioxide supersonic aircraft purchase agreement marks an important step toward our mission to create a more accessible world,” said Blake Scholl, founder and CEO of Boom Supersonic. United and Boom share a common goal: to unite the world safely and sustainably. With speeds twice as fast, United passengers will experience all the benefits of life in person, from deeper, more productive business relationships to longer, more relaxing vacations to distant destinations.”

Blake Scholl (pictured), founder and CEO of Boom, said: 'United and Boom share a common goal - uniting the world safely and sustainably'

Blake Scholl (pictured), founder and CEO of Boom, said: ‘United and Boom share a common goal – uniting the world safely and sustainably’

Scott Kirby, CEO of United said: “United continues to build a more innovative, sustainable airline, and current technological advances make it more feasible to include supersonic aircraft.

Boom’s vision for the future of commercial aviation, combined with the industry’s most robust route network in the world, will give business and leisure travelers access to a great flying experience. Our mission has always been to connect people and now, together with Boom, we can do that on an even larger scale.’

Last year, Boom unveiled a full prototype supersonic jet, the first of its kind to take to the skies in nearly 50 years.

Earlier this year, rival supersonic jet fighter firm Aerion unveiled a ‘first glimpse’ of its AS3TM aircraft, designed to carry up to 50 passengers at speeds of up to ‘Mach 4+’ – or at least 3,000 mph.

Last year, Boom unveiled a large-scale supersonic jet prototype, the first of its kind to take to the skies in nearly 50 years.

Last year, Boom unveiled a large-scale supersonic jet prototype, the first of its kind to take to the skies in nearly 50 years.

Florida-based Aerion said conceptual and design work for the jet was underway, “built around input from potential customers.” Before the AS3TM takes to the skies, Aerion plans to launch its 1000mph AS2 business jet.

And in March of this year, new eye-opening renderings were released of the interior of a 1,100 mph (Mach 1.6) supersonic jet by Boston-based Spike Aerospace, which is expected to begin test flights in 2022 and start flying passengers in 2028.

Concorde, the last supersonic passenger aircraft, entered service in 1976 and continued to fly for 27 years. It is one of only two supersonic transports to be operated commercially.

Florida-based supersonic jet fighter company Aerion recently unveiled a 'first glimpse' of its AS3TM aircraft, designed to carry up to 50 passengers at speeds of up to 'Mach 4+' - or at least 3,000 mph.

Florida-based supersonic jet fighter company Aerion recently unveiled a ‘first glimpse’ of its AS3TM aircraft, designed to carry up to 50 passengers at speeds of up to ‘Mach 4+’ – or at least 3,000 mph.

In March of this year, Boston-based Spike Aerospace released new eye-opening renderings of the interior of a 1,100 mph (Mach 1.6) supersonic jet.

In March of this year, Boston-based Spike Aerospace released new dazzling renderings of the interior of a 1,100 mph (Mach 1.6) supersonic jet.

It had a maximum speed of twice the speed of sound at Mach 2.04 (1,354 mph or 2,180 kph at cruising altitude) and could seat 92 to 128 passengers.

Concorde was jointly developed and manufactured by Aérospatiale and the British Aircraft Corporation (BAC) under an Anglo-French treaty.

Air France and British Airways each received seven aircraft.

Concorde retired in 2003 due to a general downturn in the commercial aviation industry following the type’s only crash in 2000, the September 11 attacks in 2001 and a decision by Airbus, the successor to Aérospatiale and BAC, to discontinue maintenance support. to put.

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