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Union leader Keir Starmer calls for job protection because the economy is affected by the coronavirus crisis

Union leader Keir Starmer calls for job protection with ‘back-to-work budget’ as corona virus crisis ravages the economy

  • Sir Keir Starmer said Labor would not make workers pay for the COVID-19 crisis
  • The Labor leader also described the government’s pandemic response as slow
  • He spoke during an online broadcast of the annual Durham Miners’ Gala
  • Sir Keir called for a budget to return to work, which is aimed at unemployment

Labor leader Sir Keir Starmer once again called for a “back-to-work” budget to be submitted by the government and aimed at employment.

In an online version of the Durham Miners Gala, Sir Keir called the government’s response to the corona virus crisis “slow” and “confusing.”

The Labor leader said his party will not allow communities and their workers to pay the economic costs of the virus.

Sir Keir Starmer once again calls on the government to introduce a 'back-to-work' budget that focuses on employment

Sir Keir Starmer once again called on the government to introduce a “job-recovery” budget focused on employment

He told a Facebook broadcast of the Gala: “Coronavirus has shown the strength in our communities, showing that our economy depends on the essential workers who kept our country running.

“And let me say this now, and let me say it clearly: labor will not allow workers in their communities to pay the costs of this crisis.

“It is not your job and many of you, and your families, have been on the front lines, in our hospitals, our shops, our nursing homes, to keep schools open to the children of key workers and in so many other jobs that are long undervalued and underpaid.

“But we also need to draw on the spirit of the Gala to ensure that your jobs and industries are protected when we come out of this crisis. Therefore, Labor advocates a budget to return to work.

“We are already paying the economic price of the government’s slow and confused reaction to saving jobs. Therefore, a return to work budget should have one focus: jobs, jobs, jobs. ‘

The Durham Miners’ Gala normally draws around 200,000 people, but was forced to be kept online due to the global pandemic.

Mr. Starmer spoke at the Durham Miners Gala, which was broadcast online this year

The Durham Miners Gala (pictured in 2019) normally draws around 200,000 people, but was broadcast online due to the COVID-19 crisis. This year is Sir Keir's first Gala as Labor leader

The Durham Miners Gala (pictured in 2019) normally draws around 200,000 people, but was broadcast online due to the COVID-19 crisis. This year is Sir Keir's first Gala as Labor leader

The Durham Miners Gala (pictured in 2019) normally draws around 200,000 people, but was broadcast online due to the COVID-19 crisis. This year is Sir Keir’s first Gala as Labor leader

Union Deputy Leader Angela Rayner (pictured) also spoke at the Durham Miners Gala event on Facebook Live

Labor deputy leader Angela Rayner (pictured) was also spoken at the Durham Miners Gala event via Facebook Live

Union Deputy Leader Angela Rayner (pictured) also spoke at the Durham Miners Gala event on Facebook Live

The annual occasion is the largest union event in Europe and has only been canceled due to world wars or national strikes.

Deputy leader of the organization of work, Angela Rayner, also spoke at the Gala, claiming that the gap between the North and South of England continues to widen.

Ms Rayner said, “We are strong together. And in the coming months, we will need our collective strength to prevent the most vulnerable in our society from bearing the brunt of the economic impact of the corona virus.

“Our mining communities know the human costs of mass unemployment. We know what it feels like to be let down by a Tory government and that an entire generation is being transferred to what the Thatcher government called “managed decline”. We can’t let that happen again.

“The gap between north and south continues to widen and we can’t afford the economic impact of the corona virus to widen this gap.”

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