Advertisements
A cricket bat signed by Sir Don Bradman

Unemployed man beats gold by finding a rare $ 40,000 bat used by Australian cricket legend Don Bradman at an auction in a small town

  • James Sanders scored the antiques at an auction on the South Island of New Zealand
  • He is said to have bought the bat for a few hundred dollars, but it is worth $ 40,000
  • How the bat landed in the country is unclear because Bradman never played there
Advertisements

A cricket bat signed by Sir Don Bradman

A cricket bat signed by Sir Don Bradman

An unemployed man has scored a bat in an auction that is owned by cricket legend Sir Donald Bradman.

Christchurch sports fan James Sanders found the signed antiques at an auction that was probably held somewhere on the South Island of New Zealand.

Advertisements

The lucky buyer reportedly bought the bat signed by Bradman for a few hundred dollars, but it is believed to be worth up to $ 40,000.

Bradman – & # 39; the world's greatest batsman – had never played in New Zealand and it is unclear how the rare item ended up in the country.

& # 39; I was excited before the auction – I only knew it was a bat signed by Bradman and I thought I'd take a squat. It was a William Sykes (brand) bat, his bat of choice, & said Mr. Sanders NZ Herald.

& # 39; I knew it was something special, but I got very excited when I got it home and realized that he owned it. & # 39;

The bat, which has Bradman & # 39; s signature at the top, may have been used during the controversial Bodyline bowling test series of England in 1932-33.

The item has also been signed by 16 other English cricket players, including Captain Douglas Jardine, who pioneered the Bodyline tactic.

But the esteemed possession lacked scoring highlights, which Bradman is known to have given away on his bats.

Bradman (photo) - & # 39; the world's greatest batsman - had never played in New Zealand and is therefore unclear how the rare item ended up in the country
Advertisements

Bradman (photo) - & # 39; the world's greatest batsman - had never played in New Zealand and is therefore unclear how the rare item ended up in the country

Bradman (photo) – & # 39; the world's greatest batsman – had never played in New Zealand and is therefore unclear how the rare item ended up in the country

Bradman specialist and auctioneer Charles Leski from Melbourne auctioned the first Australian test bat for $ 145,000.

It is suspected that Bradman gave the bat to the English team after the 1932/33 series in Australia, which traveled two games to New Zealand.

& # 39; I certainly have not had a hit with it. I just put it in the corner of my bedroom for storage, & said Mr. Sanders.

Advertisements

. (TagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) news (t) new zealand