UK & # 039; Spiral-fast obesity crisis can lead to an increase in liver disease

Obesity crisis that causes cases of liver disease: patients with type 2 diabetes DO twice the chance of the disease

  • Review of nearly 19 million people said that people with diabetes should be monitored
  • Research was by Queen Mary University of London and University of Glasgow
  • Type 2 diabetes is directly related to poor eating habits and sedentary lifestyles

The ever increasing number of Britons with type 2 diabetes has more than twice as much chance of developing an aggressive liver disease, according to a large study.

The assessment of nearly 19 million people said that those with diabetes should be closely monitored because of their increased risk of life-threatening liver disease.

The study, led by experts at Queen Mary University of London and University of Glasgow, suggests that the spiral obesity crisis in the UK can lead to a peak in cases of liver cancer.

The assessment of nearly 19 million people said that those with diabetes should be closely monitored because of their increased risk of life-threatening liver disease

The assessment of nearly 19 million people said that those with diabetes should be closely monitored because of their increased risk of life-threatening liver disease

Type 2 diabetes is directly related to poor eating habits and sedentary lifestyles and is the fastest growing health crisis in the UK, with the number of people affected doubling in the last 20 years. Last month's NHS figures revealed that 202,665 new cases of type 2 diabetes were detected in England and Wales in 2017 – or one in three minutes.

Diabetes is associated with an abundance of health problems and the study will raise further concerns about the relationship with dangerous liver disorders.

It found a direct link between patients with type 2 diabetes throughout Europe with those who also suffer from non-alcoholic fatty liver. Analysis found that diabetic patients are 2.3 times more likely to develop an aggressive form of this disease, known as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, than healthy adults.

Having type 2 diabetes increases the risk of developing a liver disease into cancer and cirrhosis, scars associated with long-term liver damage.

Lead researcher Dr. William Alazawi of Queen Mary University in London said: & diabetics have an increased risk of more advanced, life-threatening stages of the disease. This suggests that we should focus our efforts on teaching and preventing liver diseases in diabetic patients. & # 39;

The study, led by experts at Queen Mary University of London and the University of Glasgow, suggests that the spiral obesity crisis in the UK can lead to a peak in liver cancer cases.

The study, led by experts at Queen Mary University of London and the University of Glasgow, suggests that the spiral obesity crisis in the UK can lead to a peak in liver cancer cases.

The study, led by experts at Queen Mary University of London and the University of Glasgow, suggests that the spiral obesity crisis in the UK can lead to a peak in liver cancer cases.

More than two million Britons suffer from different types of liver disease, but often this is not diagnosed.

Of the 18.8 million adults who were sampled for the study from the UK, the Netherlands, Italy and Spain, 136,700 were registered with both serious and less severe forms of liver disease.

The study, published in the journal BMC Medicine, is the largest of its kind and showed that people with liver disease are also more likely to develop high blood pressure and obesity.

Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that occurs when the body stops producing insulin. Type 2 is largely preventable.

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