Take a fresh look at your lifestyle.

Ubisoft’s creative director and two other senior executives resign during an investigation into sexual violence

French gaming giant Ubisoft says goodbye to its creative director and two other senior executives after an internal investigation into claims of sexual harassment and other workplace abuse, the company announced.

In a statement released Saturday, Ubisoft said that his chief creative officer Serge Hascoet – the man responsible for leading the company’s blockbuster franchises, including Assassin’s Creed and Far Cry – stepped down with immediate effect.

Ubisoft’s Canadian studio director Yannis Mallat will also leave immediately, as “recent allegations that have come to light in Canada against multiple employees make it impossible for him to continue this position,” the company said.

Cécile Cornet, the company’s global head of human resources, also left her position believing that it was “in the interest of the company’s unity”.

“Ubisoft has breached its commitment to ensure a safe and inclusive work environment for its employees,” said Yves Guillemot, CEO and co-founder, of the study’s findings.

“This is unacceptable because toxic behavior is in direct contrast to values ​​I have never compromised – and never will be.”

Ubisoft said his chief creative officer Serge Hascoet - the man responsible for leading the company's blockbuster franchises, including Assassin's Creed and Far Cry - had stepped down with immediate effect

Ubisoft said his chief creative officer Serge Hascoet – the man responsible for leading the company’s blockbuster franchises, including Assassin’s Creed and Far Cry – had stepped down with immediate effect

Ubisoft launched an internal investigation last month after disturbing allegations of workplace sexual abuse started circulating online

Ubisoft launched an internal investigation last month after disturbing allegations of workplace sexual abuse started circulating online

Ubisoft launched an internal investigation last month after disturbing allegations of workplace sexual abuse started circulating online

Guillemot added that he is “committed to making profound changes across the company to improve and strengthen our work culture.”

Hascoet joined Ubisoft in 1987, the year after Guillemot founded the company with his four brothers. Ubisoft had previously described Hascoet as its “creative leader” whose “unique vision has permeated every game released by the company.”

His departure comes in the wake of an internal probe launched last month after allegations of sexual misconduct with the company surfaced online.

Hascoet’s name was often mentioned in the series of unsettling claims. In a report published in the French newspaper LiberationHascoet is painted by Ubisoft employees as a poisonous figure who ‘was even appreciated for his toxicity, his misogyny, his homophobia and … his libidinous behavior’.

In an allegation, Hascoet is accused of ever criticizing the criticism of a female vice president by referring her to colleagues as a ‘bad f ***’ who ‘hindered his creativity and that someone would open her mind by’ f *** her from behind ‘and’ share with her until she gets it ‘.

In another alleged incident, Hascoet reportedly “blocked a woman on the elevator and pressed herself against her, making groaning noises and looking into her eyes.” He then reportedly encouraged his editorial staff to do the same, until it became a “signature move.”

Other employees claimed that Hascoet was known to drug workers “without their knowledge”, including members of the top management, by handing out cakes with marijuana.

The former chief creative officer is also said to have used a homophobic slur during a working dinner. The source said Hascoet forced his creative directors to drink until they were sick and yelled, “You’re goddamn if you don’t drink.”

The director of Ubisoft’s Canadian studios, Yannis Mallat, also leaves immediately, because “recent allegations that have come to light in Canada against multiple employees make it impossible for him to continue this position,” the company said.

Liberation first reported on the alleged misconduct on July 1 and then again in an updated article on July 10. In the aftermath of the first article, employees noted that the seemingly toxic work environment at Ubisoft had intensified.

“Since your disclosures, the situation here has gotten worse,” a source told the outlet. ‘[Leaders] are convinced that this will harm their freedom. They call it a “witch hunt”. Moreover, as women, we became a threat. ‘

The article describes other hostile circumstances made possible by Ubisoft HR, notably a definition of workplace harassment code that was updated in 2015 to remove the example of a manager sexually harassing a reporting employee.

A source who oversaw the drafting of the code of conduct said HR management declined to include the idea that a manager might be harassed because it was “ deemed too pessimistic and employees would think it could happen. ”

“The people responsible for dealing with employees and their career paths within the company are not trained to deal with harassment. They don’t know how to listen to victims. Even worse, they were never told to take people’s welfare into account for the company. Never. Never, never, ”said the source.

Another employee, who started working at Ubisoft immediately after graduation, also described a ‘toxic’ work environment.

“It was so bad that I focused on my own survival,” said the source. “I feel bad that I belonged to this toxic team, where we would nickname colleagues at meetings who called an eccentric game designer ‘the idiot’.

“Actually as soon as something was deviating [from the established tone], the attitude was to pretend the person was abnormal. ‘

The source described how a female team member was described as “a slut, a crazy woman we should ignore.”

“Ubisoft has breached its commitment to ensure a safe and inclusive work environment for its employees,” said Yves Guillemot, CEO and co-founder, of the study’s findings.

Maxime Beland, co-founder of Ubisoft Toronto, resigned earlier this month amid a slew of allegations of sexual assault and misconduct

Maxime Beland, co-founder of Ubisoft Toronto, resigned earlier this month amid a slew of allegations of sexual assault and misconduct

Maxime Beland, co-founder of Ubisoft Toronto, resigned earlier this month amid a slew of allegations of sexual assault and misconduct

Earlier this month, Maxis Beland, co-founder of Ubisoft Toronto, also announced his resignation amid a slew of allegations of sexual assault and misconduct.

The most prominent accusation was the result of an incident in which Beland had smothered a female colleague at a company party in 2014.

Beland has also been accused of “humiliating” jokes against female colleagues that would lead to requests for oral sex.

Vice Presidents Tommy Francois and Andrien “Escoblades” Gbinigie were also suspended.

A survey by Kotaku concluded that Ubisoft executives “perpetuate an overall work culture that underestimates women’s contributions, normalizes sexism and harassment, and apologizes to the worst offenders while leaving complaints about them unresolved.”

Ashraf Ismail, the creative director of the Assassin's Creed franchise, left the company last month over allegations of his personal life

Ashraf Ismail, the creative director of the Assassin's Creed franchise, left the company last month over allegations of his personal life

Ashraf Ismail, the creative director of the Assassin’s Creed franchise, left the company last month over allegations of his personal life

Ashraf Ismail, the creative director of the Assassin’s Creed franchise, left the company last month over charges of his personal life.

“I am leaving my beloved project to properly tackle the personal problems in my life. The lives of my family and mine have been destroyed. I am very sorry that everyone was hurt in this, ‘tweeted Ismail.

Ubisoft has 18,000 employees worldwide and is the latest video game company accused of sexual harassment.

The global gaming industry has been hampered by criticism of its treatment of women in both games and real life.

The fallout was encapsulated in the 2014 gamergate controversy, in which critics of the way women were portrayed in games threatened death and rape, prompting calls to reform the culture of the industry.

Ubisoft’s internal probe is ongoing and 20 or more other workers are also under investigation by external auditors.

“These must lead to termination,” Liberation reported.

.