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U.S. deaths top 1000 for the FOURTH DAY in a row, as 18 states set daily records of infections

The number of deaths from the US coronavirus exceeded 1,000 for the fourth day in a row on Friday, as 18 states set daily records of infections.

As many as 1,019 Americans were killed by the virus in the past day, ending a dismal week with 1,140 deaths on Thursday, 1,135 Wednesday and 1,141 Tuesday.

Infections rose at least 68,800 on Friday, driven by escalating outbreaks in the south and west, with Arizona, California, Florida, Texas, and California particularly hard hit.

More than 4.1 million people have been infected with the virus and 145,565 people have been killed.

A total of 18 states surpassed their own records for new daily infections this week, as the U.S. plans to break the national record of 75,697 new cases within one day on July 16.

California, South Carolina, North Dakota, Kentucky, Hawaii, Alabama, Alaska, Indiana, Kansas, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Utah, and West Virginia have all set their own records for daily cases, while forty states also recorded a 14-day increase in per capita infections.

Florida has now joined California in overtaking the former New York virus epicenter in terms of totally confirmed cases.

The Sunshine State added another 12,444 cases to its count and increased the number of infections to 414,511, according to figures from Johns Hopkins University.

California leads the way with more than 440,000 cases, while New York has turned down cases after going through one of the longest closings of all states.

Governor Gavin Newsom announced new measures for the state’s nursing homes after it was found that nursing home inspectors were visiting the facilities without being tested for the virus.

The shocking revelation came as part of an LA Times investigation, suggesting that inspectors may unknowingly infect some of the most vulnerable populations.

Despite rising cases and deaths in the United States, Deborah Birx, coordinator of the White House coronavirus, insisted that the worst of the crisis could be over for the hard-hit southern and western states.

Orlando City employees conduct COVID-19 testing at a drive-thru test site. Florida has now joined California to overtake former New York virus epicenter in terms of totally confirmed cases

Orlando City employees conduct COVID-19 testing at a drive-thru test site. Florida has now joined California to overtake former New York virus epicenter in terms of totally confirmed cases

Orlando City employees conduct COVID-19 testing at a drive-thru test site. Florida has now joined California to overtake former New York virus epicenter in terms of totally confirmed cases

Doctors treat a patient in a Texas hospital. There are many cases in the South and West of America, and the US deaths exceeded 1000 for the fourth day in a row on Friday

Doctors treat a patient in a Texas hospital. There are many cases in the South and West of America, and the US deaths exceeded 1000 for the fourth day in a row on Friday

Doctors treat a patient in a Texas hospital. There are many cases in the South and West of America, and the US deaths exceeded 1000 for the fourth day in a row on Friday

“We’re already starting to see a plateau in these critically four states that have really suffered in the past four weeks, so Texas, California, Arizona and Florida, those big subways and in their counties,” Birx told NBC news.

Birx’s comments are because federal health and education officials emphasized the need to continue returning to school as soon as possible.

The U.S. public and its leaders are very divided about whether students should return to school during the fall pandemic.

Birx said children under the age of 18 tend to be less sick than older adults due to the sometimes deadly disease, but called it an “open question” how easily those under 10 can spread the virus.

Donald Trump has pushed for school reopening and says it is critical to children’s mental and emotional well-being and their parents’ ability to work, after company closings and ‘stay-at-home’ orders throw millions away from work.

The CDC has called for a reopening of schools in a statement on its website listing the benefits of school time and mitigating health risks, although it said exceptions should be made for so-called virus hotspots.

Despite the rising cases and deaths in the United States, the White House coordinator urged Dr. Coronavirus.

Despite rising cases and deaths in the United States, White House coordinator Dr. Coronavirus urged. Deborah Birx, insists that the worst of the crisis could be over for the hard-hit southern and western states

Despite rising cases and deaths in the United States, White House coordinator Dr. Coronavirus urged. Deborah Birx, insists that the worst of the crisis could be over for the hard-hit southern and western states

Most teacher unions, which have too much political influence in some states and cities, especially among Democrats, have fought hard against reopenings.

The guidelines were “all drawn up with the intention, as mentioned earlier, to facilitate the full reopening of schools for personal learning,” said Dr. Robert Redfield, the director of the CDC.

While the risk of severe COVID-19 for children is considered to be relatively low, there is a fear that they could contaminate teachers and other workers.

Schools across the country open on different dates, with different ways of teaching – virtual instruction, in-class in person or a combination of both – and different or unclear expectations of how long each phase will last.

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