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Two thirds of the over-75s will not move to nursing homes due to coronavirus

Nearly two in three over-75s say they move to care homes more often after the coronavirus crisis, new research shows.

During the pandemic, an estimated 30,000 residents of nursing homes have died to date, prompting arguments between the government and healthcare providers over the past few days over the debt.

Failures included transferring patients from hospitals without testing the virus and the lack of adequate protective equipment for staff.

Shake-up promised: over half of over-45s believe delays in social care reform have hampered response to Covid-19

Shake-up promised: over half of over-45s believe delays in social care reform have hampered response to Covid-19

Since 2012, there has been an upward trend for people to say that they would try to ensure that their care needs are met in their own homes, according to an annual report from financial services provider Just Group.

There is a financial incentive for this, because people’s own homes are excluded from the means test until they move to a residential care center.

In a May Group survey in May, 48 percent of those over 45 said the Covid-19 crisis made it more likely that they would try to get care at home, up to 64 percent among those over 75.

The study also reported that 56 percent of over-45s believe that delays in social care reform hampered response to Covid-19.

How is care currently reimbursed?

In the current system, a person’s wealth, including the family home, is depleted to £ 23,250 if he has to go to a nursing home.

If you require care at home, your wealth must be exhausted to a level set by your municipality, which should not be less than £ 23,250, but your home is excluded from this resource test.

In their manifesto, the conservatives offered a “guarantee” that no one in need of care would have to sell their house to pay for it, and vowed to make an urgent attempt to build consensus between the parties as a condition.

A social care plan to replace the unpopular idea of ​​the government in the 2017 election to introduce a £ 100,000 ‘floor’ for personal contributions to care has been expected for years and could be published in the fall .

Home care costs add up to tens of thousands of pounds per year – see box below.

Just Group found that 52 percent of over-45s believe that agreeing to a social care policy will be a government priority after the coronavirus crisis, while 29 percent don’t know and 19 percent don’t.

Her research also revealed:

– About 75 percent of over-45s believe the government should pay the bill if someone needs care, but can’t afford it

– A ceiling on health care costs is the most popular financing option, with 58 percent of the over-45s supporting it – a record high – and 65 percent of the over-75s

– In a case study on whether for someone with a home of £ 500,000 but no other assets, health care costs should be recovered from the final sale, 52 percent thought it would be fair to reclaim some proceeds, 11 percent thought it was fair to take them all, and 37 percent thought it was unfair.

Price breakdown: expected costs are purple and actual costs are green. Bills vary greatly depending on factors such as location. In the South East the average cost is £ 40,716 per year, compared to Northern Ireland at £ 28,028.

Price breakdown: expected costs are purple and actual costs are green. Bills vary greatly depending on factors such as location. In the South East the average cost is £ 40,716 per year, compared to Northern Ireland at £ 28,028.

Price breakdown: expected costs are purple and actual costs are green. Bills vary greatly depending on factors such as location. In the South East the average cost is £ 40,716 per year, compared to Northern Ireland at £ 28,028.

Just Group’s healthcare report was based on findings from two studies of people over 45, one in February and the other in May.

Stephen Lowe, group communications director at the company, says, “Later care has been the elephant in the room for families for years – a problem they were easier to ignore than to address.

Politicians reinforce this by promising promising reforms, but never achieving results.

“In the aftermath of the coronavirus, we desperately need our policy makers to breathe new life into the debate and point the way to a system that helps people look forward with confidence instead of shyness.”

Source: Just Group care report 2020

Source: Just Group care report 2020

Source: Just Group care report 2020

He adds, “The big question in the future is whether the coronavirus will be a catalyst for change or an excuse to kick the road back.”

Steven Cameron, pension director at Aegon, says finding a sustainable solution for social care financing is “very late” and that good consultation is needed to ensure a broad public buy-in.

“As health care institutions are hardest hit by the Covid-19 crisis, it is imperative that the government address the longstanding issue of finding a sustainable and fair way to finance social care to our most vulnerable dignity of the elderly guarantee at a later age.

“This probably requires a distribution of costs between the government and individuals based on their wealth. What is essential is that people have certainty about what is expected of them so that they can plan ahead and protect their legacy ambitions. ‘

Source: Just Group care report 2020

Source: Just Group care report 2020

Source: Just Group care report 2020

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