Two metal detectorists charged with theft after discovering 1,000 Iron Age gold coins in Essex

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Two metal detectorists in their 60s charged with theft after discovering 1,000 Iron Age gold coins worth ‘more than a million pounds’ in Essex

  • Couple in their 60s charged after discovery of 1,000 Iron Age gold coins in Essex
  • Shane Wood and Kim Holman are accused of failing to report the treasures
  • Wood, from Chelmsford, has also been charged with equipment for theft

Two metal detectors in their 60s have been charged with theft of nearly 1,000 Iron Age gold coins that could be worth more than £ 1 million in Essex.

The ‘Detectorists’ couple were arrested after finding the Iron Age gold staters that were over 2,000 years old in an unidentified field in the Chelmsford area, but had not been declared under treasure finding laws.

Shane Wood, 62, of Great Baddow near Chelmsford and 61-year-old Kim Holman, of Chadwell Heath, near Ilford, have been charged under the Treasure Act 1996 and will be brought to trial on April 30. Chelmsford Magistrates are coming.

Shane Wood and Kim Holman will appear at Chelmsford Magistrates Court next month and will be charged with failing to declare 1,000 Iron Age gold coins they allegedly found in Essex.

Shane Wood and Kim Holman will appear at Chelmsford Magistrates Court next month and will be charged with failing to declare 1,000 Iron Age gold coins they allegedly found in Essex.

They are charged with theft and finding an item believed to be treasure, and failing to notify the coroner.

Wood will also respond to an allegation of equipment for theft.

The Celtic coins were dated between 500 BC. And 500 AD. Common and values ​​range from £ 100 to £ 5,000.

Last year, another East Anglia treasure hunter found a treasure of 1,300 coins from the period AD 40-50 at the secret location.

The unnamed metal detector, unnamed, saw a glint of gold as it watched a buzzard in a freshly plowed field in the east of England.

After rubbing the mud to reveal a 2,000-year-old gold stater coin, he ran home to retrieve his metal detector and returned to search further.

After a few hours, and to his utter disbelief, he found about 1,300 coins, all dating from about AD 40-50.

Experts believe that each coin can be worth up to £ 650, bringing the treasure’s value to £ 845,000.

The haul beat the previous-record Celtic hoard of 850 coins found at Wickham Market, near Ipswich, by a detectorist in 2008.

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