Advertisements
Two daredevils risked their lives and jumped in crocodile-ravaged water to pose for an Instagram photo (photo, Tim and his friend posing for a crocodile trap)

& # 39; We did it for the photo & # 39 ;: two men risk their lives by puffing beers in a crocodile trap for Instagram glory – but saying it's OK because they & # 39; experts & # 39; are on the infamous river

  • Two men jumped into crocodile-ridden Katherine River for a photo last week
  • Tim and his friend had dumped a few beers before they dared to stunt
  • He admitted that it wasn't the best idea, but wanted to pose for Instagram photos
  • Only last year was the largest crocodile caught in the river and measured 4.7 m
  • Do you know more Contact aidan.wondracz@mailonline.com
Advertisements

Two daredevils risked their lives and jumped into crocodile infested water to pose for a photo for a crocodile trap.

Tim and his friend had a few beers before deciding last week to go for a swim in the Katherine River, in the Northern Territory.

Only last year did nature guards catch the largest crocodile ever seen along the 330 km long stretch of water after they brought in a 4.7 meter long crocodile.

Although Tim admitted he knew it wasn't a good idea to jump into the water, he said the rules took a back seat for Instagram glory, NT News reported.

Advertisements

Two daredevils risked their lives and jumped in crocodile-ravaged water to pose for an Instagram photo (photo, Tim and his friend posing for a crocodile trap)

Two daredevils risked their lives and jumped in crocodile-ravaged water to pose for an Instagram photo (photo, Tim and his friend posing for a crocodile trap)

Tim and his friend dumped a few beers before deciding to plunge into the crocodile-infested Katherine River, in the Northern Territory, last week (stock image)

Tim and his friend dumped a few beers before deciding to plunge into the crocodile-infested Katherine River, in the Northern Territory, last week (stock image)

Tim and his friend dumped a few beers before deciding to plunge into the crocodile-infested Katherine River, in the Northern Territory, last week (stock image)

A photo of the couple showed Tim and his nameless friend posing in the dangerous waters before a crocodile trap.

A wide grinning Tim holds a cigarette in one hand and a beer in the other with half his body submerged in the water.

His friend is sitting on the crocodile trap with his legs in the river.

Advertisements

Tim said he was aware of the dangers of the river, but that he was a bit of a & # 39; expert & # 39; was on the river and was aware of the threat of crocodiles.

& # 39; (But) I thought it would be good, it had been a bad wet season and they hadn't done much that way, & # 39; he said.

& # 39; We did it fairly for the photo. & # 39;

Ministry of Tourism, Sports and Culture Senior nature keeper John Burke said that crocodile traps were strategically placed in areas where there was a known presence of predators.

& # 39; Crocodile traps are placed in areas where crocodiles are known to be inhabited, so there are real risks associated with this type of behavior, "he said.

Advertisements

This year alone, four crocodiles have been caught in different traps along the Katherine River.

Anyone who is caught interfering with a crocodile trap risks a fine of $ 7,850 or six months in prison.

The saltwater crocodile is considered to be one of the deadliest animals in the country with an estimated 150,000 in the Top End – or in Northern Australia.

The impressive power of their jaws makes them a formidable beast in the wild.

They have the ability to apply 5000 pounds of pressure per square inch with their jaws – people can only apply 100 pounds per square inch.

Advertisements

Despite the iron-coated bite, crocodiles have little & # 39; opening power & # 39; and their mouth can be closed with a band.

The Katherine River extends over 330 km along the Northern Territory (stock image)

The Katherine River extends over 330 km along the Northern Territory (stock image)

The Katherine River extends over 330 km along the Northern Territory (stock image)

. (TagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) news