Twitter is reportedly working on Facebook-like tweet responses

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Twitter could make one of the biggest UI changes in its history with Facebook-style emoji responses to tweets.

The social network is working on five possible responses to tweets — “Likes,” “Cheer,” “Hmm,” “Sad” and “Haha” — to complement its existing retweet capability, according to Hong Kong app researcher and tipster Jane . Manchun Wong.

Currently, Twitter users can only click the heart icon to “like” a tweet and indicate their approval of a tweet, as well as click retweet.

Wong tweeted a screenshot of what the five options might look like, though three have the same red heart emoji placeholder, suggesting the emoji itself has yet to be finalized.

‘The icons for the Cheer and Sad reactions are WIP [works in progress] and currently represented as the general heart,” Wong said.

Responding to a request for comment, a Twitter spokesperson told MailOnline, “We’re always looking for additional ways for people to express themselves in conversations happening on Twitter.”

Twitter, which tends to be tight-lipped about upcoming features in development, wouldn’t confirm or deny the change.

It’s possible that Facebook-like emoji reactions are indeed in development at Twitter, but would never be rolled out.

Twitter is also working on Twitter Blue, a monthly subscription service for £2.49 or $2.99.

Twitter could make one of the biggest user interface changes in its history with Facebook-style emoji responses, according to app researcher and tipster Jane Manchun.

Twitter could make one of the biggest user interface changes in its history with Facebook-style emoji responses, according to app researcher and tipster Jane Manchun.

WILL THERE BE AN EDIT BUTTON ON TWITTER?

When asked in January of last year whether the edit button would be introduced in 2020, Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey simply replied, “The answer is no.”

In an interview with WiredDorsey said at the time: The reason there’s no edit button [and] there was traditionally no edit button, we started out as a text messaging service.

“So as you all know, when you text you can’t really take it back. We wanted to keep that vibe and that feeling in the early years.’

Dorsey has previously said that two types of editing were considered.

One would give users a short amount of time after the mail is sent – say, five minutes – to make any corrections.

The other would work in a similar way to Facebook’s edit feature, allowing users to change what they’ve written at any time, but with a log of the changes visible.

Facebook-style reaction emojis seemed to be a controversial idea – in response to Wong’s tweet, one user, @mauroleocadio_ said: “I HATE the haha ​​comment because it can be used to bully and joke about important subjects.

“We’ll see this on Facebook, we’ll see this here too…don’t pollute Twitter.”

Another user, @tripti_bakshiBP, simply tweeted, “We don’t need another facebook wtf.”

Another user, @PepeVk, suggested that Twitter would be better off introducing the ability to dislike a tweet, as an addition to the existing “like” heart, to give a general indication. showing how controversial a tweet is.

“The only way you can tell if a tweet is controversial is if it has more ‘cited tweets’ than likes, or by reading the comments yourself,” said @PepeVk.

Another user seemed to applaud the potential change – “they need to add more comments on Twitter spaces,” said @linusbeardstan.

Meanwhile @K28Mads said, ‘We just want bookmark folders and an edit button.’

An edit button is Twitter’s most requested feature, but the platform doesn’t seem to be quick to give in to users’ demands.

One of the potential problems with allowing users to edit their tweets is the possibility that they can completely change the content of their post once it is endorsed by millions of likes and retweets.

Many people who have only recently signed up to Twitter will not know that it has already made a substantial – and at the time controversial – change to tweet responses.

User reactions to the idea of ​​Facebook-like reaction emojis on Twitter were generally negative

User reactions to the idea of ​​Facebook-like reaction emojis on Twitter were generally negative

In November 2015, it turned a star’s favorite symbol into a heart — a “universal symbol that resonates across languages, cultures and time zones,” it said.

“We’re going to change our favorite star icon to a heart and we’re going to call them likes,” Twitter product manager Akarshan Kumar said at the time.

“We want to make Twitter easier and more rewarding to use, and we know the star can be confusing at times, especially for newbies.”

Facebook rolled out its series of reaction emoji for users - Like, Love, Haha, Wow, Sad and Angry - in November 2015

Facebook rolled out its series of reaction emoji for users – Like, Love, Haha, Wow, Sad and Angry – in November 2015

It added the 'Care' response - a face embracing a heart - during the Covid pandemic

It added the ‘Care’ response – a face embracing a heart – during the Covid pandemic

Users initially seemed to dislike the change – one said, ‘Why are there love hearts all over Twitter? It’s like Hello Kitty threw up here.”

Shortly after, in February 2016, Facebook rolled out its comment emoji: Like, Love, Haha, Wow, Sad and Angry.

The emojis allow users to respond to other people’s statuses and comments with a wider range of emotions. Previously, users could only ‘like’ a Facebook post with a thumbs up.

In April 2020, Facebook introduced an additional seventh “Care” emoji response, featuring a face embracing a heart, to let users show their support during the coronavirus pandemic.

Last week, Twitter appeared to have falsely confirmed its plans to launch a new subscription service called Twitter Blue.

Twitter appears to have falsely confirmed its plans to launch a new subscription tier called Twitter Blue.  Twitter Blue now appears as a possible in-app purchase when viewing the Twitter app in the iOS App Store

Twitter appears to have falsely confirmed its plans to launch a new subscription tier called Twitter Blue. Twitter Blue now appears as a possible in-app purchase when viewing the Twitter app in the iOS App Store

Twitter Blue now appears as a possible in-app purchase when viewing the Twitter app in Apple’s iOS App Store, listed for £2.49 or $2.99 ​​- which is expected to be the monthly subscription price – as well as in the Google app store for Android.

According to Wong, the service will include an “Undo Send” timer for users who are unsure about posting a tweet.

Twitter users are expected to have the option to sign up with Twitter Blue – those not interested can continue to use the standard version for free.

TWITTER BLUE: WHAT WE KNOW ABOUT TWITTER’S UPCOMING SUBSCRIPTION SERVICE

This leaked screenshot of Jane Manchun Wong shows Twitter's description of Twitter Blue: 'Take your Twitter experience to the next level with exclusive features

This leaked screenshot of Jane Manchun Wong shows Twitter’s description of Twitter Blue: ‘Take your Twitter experience to the next level with exclusive features

Twitter Blue is a rumor service of the social network. It has yet to be confirmed by the company, but details have been leaked online.

In late May, Twitter posted Twitter Blue to app stores, suggesting users can try it out soon.

Twitter Blue appeared as a possible in-app purchase when viewing the Twitter app in Apple’s iOS App Store, listed for £2.49 or $2.99 ​​- which is expected to be the monthly subscription price – as well as in Google’s app store for Android.

However, Twitter Blue does not appear to be accessible in the Twitter app yet and it is not known exactly when it will be available to users.

The social network has not yet commented on Twitter Blue’s in-app purchase list and has not yet confirmed any plans around testing or its public rollout.

Twitter Blue is expected to give subscribers special exclusive features that non-paying users will not get.

One of these features is an “Undo Send” timer for tweets, according to Hong Kong-based app researcher and tipster Jane Manchun Wong.

Undo Send also previously leaked online in the form of an animation, showing a blue timer with the word “Undo” counting down after a user taps “post.”

Twitter previously confirmed to MailOnline that it is currently “testing” Undo Send, but has since declined to provide further details, including whether it is part of Twitter Blue.

Twitter Blue will also include another feature called Collections, which will allow users “save and organize favorite tweets” in folders so they’re easier to find later, according to Wong, who claims to have tested Twitter Blue.

The subscription service also includes new customizable app color schemes and the ability to customize the color of the Twitter app icon, she claims.

Leaked screenshots of Wong reveal the Twitter Blue UI and Twitter’s description of the service: “Take your Twitter experience to the next level with exclusive features.”

The screenshot also suggests that the price of £2.49 / $2.99 ​​will be automatically charged each month on a fixed date – ‘Automatically renewed monthly. Cancel at any time,” it reads.

Twitter users are expected to have the option to sign up with Twitter Blue – those not interested can continue to use the standard version for free.

Twitter would not comment in response to Twitter Blue being listed as an in-app purchase on the iOS and Android stores.

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