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Twenty woman aged 18 to 27 ‘stripped, ordered to perform squats in front of Russian police cameras’

Russian police have detained 20 women on suspicion of protesting Vladimir Putin’s war in Ukraine and forced them to undress and squat five times “in front of police cameras,” the group claimed.

The “suspects” aged 18 to 27 were arrested at or near a rally in the city of Nizhny Novgorod and subjected to “degrading and degrading” treatment, their lawyer said.

Female police officers ordered them to undress, but in some cases cell doors were open and male officers walked past.

In all cases, mobile cameras with video recorders spied on the alleged abuse.

Men held at the same time were not subjected to the strip-and-squat orders.

Twenty women detained on suspicion of protesting Vladimir Putin's war were forced to undress and squat

Twenty women detained on suspicion of protesting Vladimir Putin’s war were forced to undress and squat “in front of police cameras” five times. Pictured: Russian police officer surrounded woman detained in Nizhny Novgorod during an anti-war rally in March

“I am outraged that each of them has been searched in a degrading manner in the detention center, in violation of our law,” complained lawyer Olimpiada Usanova, who is going to court on behalf of the women to challenge their treatment.

“The women were searched five times by stripping naked and squatting in the presence of a detention center officer.

“A few hours later, a second humiliating search of the cells took place and the women were forced to lift their shirts, take off their panties and bare their breasts in the CCTV room.

“I am concerned that female officers have not closed the doors because some women were investigated and male agents were lurking.”

She thinks male officers also viewed footage of the comic strip searches and squats on CCTV footage.

“Detained men were only patted on the front and back, that’s all,” she said. “The girls were forced to undress and squat.

“And the next day they had to undress again and unroll their bras.

‘This is despite the fact that every cell has cameras. This is a serious offense.”

Student Ekaterina Deviatenko, 18, is one of several victims who agreed to reveal their identities ahead of their attempt in court to challenge their treatment

Student Ekaterina Deviatenko, 18, is one of several victims who agreed to reveal their identities ahead of their attempt in court to challenge their treatment

Taisiya Kudelkina

Natalya Nevar

Pictured: Taisiya Kudelkina (left) and Natalya Nevar (right) are among 20 women detained during the anti-war protests. Both agreed to share their identities

Zemfira Suleimanova

Attorney Olimpiada Usanova

Pictured: Zemfira Suleimanova (left) is one of 20 women detained during the anti-war protests. She agreed to share their identities. Right: Attorney Olimpiada Usanova, representing the group of women who were detained

The scandal in the city found 250 miles east of Moscow was in March but has only now come to light as the women are taking legal action against their alleged treatment, highlighted in a report by Lydia Kuzmenko in cherta.media.

Student Ekaterina Deviatenko, 18, is one of several victims who agreed to reveal their identities ahead of their attempt in court to challenge their treatment.

She claimed to be listening to a musician near the protest rally when she was pushed into a wheeled cell and held.

“They searched us very slowly, arrogantly and with derision,” she said. “A police officer in a corner ordered me to undress. It immediately seemed strange to me.

“I first undressed down to my underwear, but the officer demanded that I undress further.

‘I replied that I had my period. The policewoman replied, “Well, I’m a woman, I understand everything. Undress and squat.”

“I had to do five squats. I sat down and then got dressed. I got bedding and was sent to the cell to the other girls. Conditions in the cell itself were appalling. There was no toilet paper, no trash can. The stench was terrible, everyone was constantly sick.’

Other women who identified themselves — all fined for protesting Putin’s war — were Zemfira Suleimanova, 25, Taisiya Kudelkina, 24, Natalya Nevar, 30, and Irina M, 26. Sormovsky police station had been addressed as “bunny” and “kitten” before being ordered to undress.

Pictured: A woman is detained by police officers at an anti-war rally in Nizhny Novgorod

Pictured: A woman is detained by police officers at an anti-war rally in Nizhny Novgorod

Pictured: Nizhny Novgorod prison where the girls were placed

Pictured: Nizhny Novgorod prison where the girls were placed

Female police officers ordered the arrested women to undress in the cells, but in some cases the cell doors were open and male officers walked past.  One of the women said the cells were equipped with CCTV cameras and believes they were being watched by male officers

Female police officers ordered the arrested women to undress in the cells, but in some cases the cell doors were open and male officers walked past. One of the women said the cells were equipped with CCTV cameras and believes they were being watched by male officers

A female officer led me to the wall and ordered me to undress completely. And squat four times.’

The next morning we were ordered to stand against a wall in our underwear and bare our breasts. This was with a camera pointed at us and a video recording.

“The cell door wasn’t shut, and there were male employees in the hallway.

Another woman, Anastasiya, 24, said a video camera was visible when she was ordered to undress and expose her breasts.

Draconian laws in Russia virtually ban protest against Putin’s bloody war in Ukraine.

The women had to pay fines of up to £215 for allegedly attending a banned anti-war rally.

“It seems to me that this was not done by the personal will of the agents, but under the supervision of the management,” said the lawyer.

“I assume this was an order specifically for the young women.

“Most were between the ages of 18 and 25. After being in the special detention center, many started having panic attacks and tantrums.

‘Some needed guidance from a psychologist after what they had been through. This is violence – violent violence. This cannot go unpunished.

“And if we don’t talk and write about it, we could face even harsher methods in the future, including rape.

“We have filed a collective lawsuit against the Interior Ministry in Nizhny Novgorod, demanding compensation for moral damages for violation of rights and humiliation.

‘We are also appealing against improper detention by police forces.’

They demand an average of £1,700 in compensation for each woman.

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