TV fisherman Paul Worsteling is struck by lighting during filming

Scary moment TV fisherman is struck by lights while filming on boat: ‘I hear the noise in the air’

  • Experienced fish show host Paul Wrestling shocked by lightning on boat
  • The 48-year-old shared a clip of the moment on YouTube last week
  • While fishing off Victoria, the storm rolls over and ‘cracks’ the air with static charge


The moment an Australian fish show host is struck by lightning while casting his rod at a fishing boat has been captured on video.

Paul Wrestling is a familiar face to most fishing fans. He has appeared on the angling show Escape with ET, hosted Rex Hunt’s Fishing Adventures and hosted his own program IFISH for over a decade.

The 48-year-old was fishing off the coast of Victoria with his son Jett when a storm hit the ground, filling the air with so much static electricity that his line “rose up into the sky like a rainbow.”

Paul Wrestling (pictured with his wife Cristy) is a popular Australian fish show host who has been running television programs for over a decade

“My line comes off the tip of the rod and goes 15 meters into the air in a big arc and then into the water.” he says in the video uploaded to YouTube last week.

“I hear the static crackle in the air.”

The boat appears to be several hundred meters offshore and lightning can be seen in the distance as storm clouds pass over.

Mr. Wrestle then throws his line into the water and immediately jerks back violently.

‘Drop it (the rod),’ his son shouts.

‘Did you hear that? I didn’t go through, I promise – I just got electrocuted,” he replies.

The fisherman casts off the Victorian coast and is immediately startled by lightning (photo)

The fisherman casts off the Victorian coast and is immediately startled by lightning (pictured)

He explains that as the line flies through the air, it appears as if it generates electricity from the air and directs it back to the rod, rather than a current from the water.

Then he casts his rod again and sees the line ‘but just keeps going straight up’.

“I’ve never seen anything like it,” he adds.

“Electricity is scary, I can’t touch that,” his son remarks.

The pair then continue fishing instead of heading back to shore as the storm itself misses them – with the younger Struggle managing to reel in a giant snapper.

Some commentators said they had experienced a similar phenomenon.

“I’ve experienced this a few times when fishing for plastic for snapper as a thunderstorm approaches. The braid just goes up in the air, usually the fish go crazy though. Dangerous but very nice,” said one of them.

Happened to me once before and even heard a buzzing sound from my reel, added another.

Mr Wrestle and his son did not return to shore, but continued fishing and hauled in a huge snapper (pictured)

Mr Wrestle and his son did not return to shore, but continued fishing and hauled in a huge snapper (pictured)

According to NASA, static electricity in the air causes lightning, which is basically a giant static electrical spark that jumps from cloud to cloud or from cloud to Earth.

Grant Kirkby, a lightning risk mitigation specialist, previously told the ABC that being on or in the water during a storm is “one of the most dangerous places you can be.”

He said if you’re in a small can, there isn’t much that can be done to reduce a lightning strike, although some larger yachts have grounding points that can safely channel the load away.

Advertisement

.