Health

Trying to lose weight? Try walking BACKWARDS on a treadmill

Trying to lose weight? Walk BACKWARDS on a treadmill: Fitness expert says bizarre fitness tricks can help you burn more fat

  • Jumping on the treadmill may sound like the obvious solution to weight loss
  • But instead of using it normally, try turning around and walking backwards
  • A fitness researcher says the bizarre trick produces “increased health benefits.”

Desperately trying to lose weight? Jumping on the treadmill may sound like the obvious solution.

But instead of using it normally, try turning around and walking backwards.

A fitness researcher says the bizarre trick — which he admits is tricky — yields “increased health benefits.”

Jack McNamara, a lecturer in clinical exercise physiology at the University of East London, claims it can help you beat the bulge.

A fitness researcher says walking backwards provides “increased health benefits.”

He pointed to a study that showed that women who followed the strange exercise regimen for six weeks lost more weight than peers who exercised normally.

The study, published in 2005, recruited 26 women. Half followed a six-week backward walking training program and lost 2.4 percent more of their body weight.

Mr McNamara said the activity burns 40 percent more energy than walking ahead at the same speed.

This is because it requires more concentration and uses extra muscles.

One of the other great benefits of walking backwards, according to Mr. McNamara, relates to improving stability and balance.

It causes us to take shorter, more frequent steps.

This, experts claim, leads to “improved muscular endurance of the muscles of the lower legs and a reduction in the stress on our joints.”

The activity also forces a posture change and uses muscles that support the lumbar spine — the five vertebrae in the lower back. By strengthening these, the risk of back pain can be reduced.

Sign up The conversationMr. McNamara said, “Walking backwards is easy, but that doesn’t mean it’s easy.

So, how can you add backward walking to your exercise regimen?

“When we walk backwards, we are more likely to miss obstacles and hazards that we could bump into or fall over.

“So in the interest of safety, it’s best to start indoors, where you won’t bump into anyone, or outside in a flat, open area.

“Once you’ve become more confident walking backwards, you can speed things up and even move onto a treadmill, making sure to use the guide rails when you need to.”

People who don’t want to run backwards can still make walking more difficult – by dragging weights.

Mr. McNamara said, “If you use weights, start light.

“Concentrate on multiple sets rather than long distances and maintain the integrity of your technique over no more than 20 yards to begin with.”

The NHS says people should exercise at moderate intensity for two and a half hours a week.

This can include brisk walking, biking, and pushing a lawnmower.

Adults should also do muscle-strengthening activities at least two days a week, such as carrying heavy shopping bags, lifting weights, and heavy gardening.

HOW MUCH MOVEMENT YOU NEED

To stay healthy, adults ages 19 to 64 should try to be active every day and do the following:

  • at least 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity, such as cycling or brisk walking per week and
  • strength exercises on 2 or more days a week that work all major muscles (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders and arms)

Or:

  • 75 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity, such as running or a game of singles tennis each week and
  • strength exercises on 2 or more days a week that work all major muscles (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders and arms)

Or:

  • a mix of moderate and vigorous aerobic activity each week – for example, 2 x 30 minutes of running plus 30 minutes of brisk walking equals 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity and
  • strength exercises on 2 or more days a week that work all major muscles (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders and arms)

A good rule of thumb is that 1 minute of vigorous activity produces the same health benefits as 2 minutes of moderate activity.

One way to get your recommended 150 minutes of weekly physical activity is to do 30 minutes on 5 days a week.

All adults should also interrupt long periods of sitting with light activity.

Source: health service

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Merry

Merry C. Vega is a highly respected and accomplished news author. She began her career as a journalist, covering local news for a small-town newspaper. She quickly gained a reputation for her thorough reporting and ability to uncover the truth.

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