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Trump’s social media order was ‘rammed’ by the administration

President Trump’s executive order, which aimed to punish Twitter for checking his tweets, bypassed the normal policy process and sparked a war between his top employees, with some complaining that he had targeted a private company for political purposes.

Protocol from the sister site of Politico a White House official reported that “the direction was from above:” to do something, “which is why the assistants rejected an executive order issued last year to address the alleged anti-conservative bias of social media companies. to grab.

“They chose this [order] off the shelf and essentially rammed it through, “the source said, as Trump signed it on Thursday afternoon.

President Trump’s executive order he signed on Thursday, targeting social media companies, was “rammed” by the policy process, according to a White House official

Social media director Dan Scavino

Social media director Dan Scavino

Vice President Mike Pence

Vice President Mike Pence

White House social media director Dan Scavino (left) was reportedly in favor of President Trump’s executive mandate, while vice president Mike Pence (right) hesitated

Dan Scavino took to Twitter on Twitter Friday morning after the social media company flagged President Trump's tweet saying 'when the looting starts, the shooting starts'

Dan Scavino took to Twitter on Twitter Friday morning after the social media company flagged President Trump's tweet saying 'when the looting starts, the shooting starts'

Dan Scavino took to Twitter on Twitter Friday morning after the social media company flagged President Trump’s tweet saying ‘when the looting starts, the shooting starts’

Twitter said Trump's tweet violated the company's rules about 'glorifying violence' and forced users to click 'more information' to read what the president wrote

Twitter said Trump's tweet violated the company's rules about 'glorifying violence' and forced users to click 'more information' to read what the president wrote

Twitter said Trump’s tweet violated the company’s rules about ‘glorifying violence’ and forced users to click ‘more information’ to read what the president wrote

Larry Kudlow, White House chief economic adviser, was one of Trump aides who believed that the President should not use his powers to go after private companies for political reasons

Larry Kudlow, White House chief economic adviser, was one of Trump aides who believed that the President should not use his powers to go after private companies for political reasons

Larry Kudlow, White House chief economic adviser, was one of Trump aides who believed that the President should not use his powers to go after private companies for political reasons

What is Donald Trump’s executive mission focused on social media sites?

Donald Trump signed an order on Thursday to hold social media sites such as Twitter and Facebook accountable for the content posted by their users.

If enforced, the warrant would overturn decades of precedent by treating the websites as “publishers” that could be sued for user-generated content.

It could open them to a stream of lawsuits from anyone who claims to have been harmed by content posted online.

Currently, the sites are protected by a law known as Section 230, which protects them from liability.

Section 230 also allows social platforms to moderate their services by removing messages that are, for example, obscene or violating the services’ own standards, as long as they act in good faith.

The author of a section 230 book said social media companies “based their business models on major user content platforms,” ​​saying they would not “exist in their current form” without the legislation.

Critics, however, argue that Article 230 gives internet companies free access to things like hate speech and content that support terror organizations.

Republican Senator Josh Hawley said the “censorship” was relevant to Trump’s proposal because websites that “redact and censor” like Twitter reportedly did should be treated “as traditional publishers” in law.

Critics, however, saw Trump’s order as an act of political revenge against websites he has long accused of political bias.

The American Civil Liberties Union called Trump’s order “a blatant and unconstitutional threat to punish social media companies that displease the President.”

An ACLU official said the measure could actually harm Trump by encouraging a more cautious Twitter to limit the president’s tweets.

Eric Goldman, director of the High-Tech Law Institute at Santa Clara University, said the warrant is “not legally enforceable.”

Twitter said the warrant was a political move that attacked free speech, while Facebook said the measure would “encourage platforms to censor anything that could offend anyone.”

The order opens sites like Twitter and Facebook to lawsuits by calling them “ publishers ” rather than platforms.

The highest level of administration was not fully on board.

Yahoo News reported that Vice President Mike Pence and National Economic Council President Larry Kudlow, among others, disliked the precedent that it created, because it seemed like Trump was using government agencies to go after private companies for political reasons.

During the Obama years, conservatives had complained about President Obama’s use of executive orders to bypass Republicans in Congress.

Democrats could now point out that Trump openly complained about his treatment by Twitter before using the same presidential power.

“There is a backlash from many people,” a government official told Yahoo News, specifically citing disagreements in the White House, adding that there is “a lot of frustration.”

According to Yahoo, the advocates for the order were White House counsel, Pat Cipollone, and director of social media Dan Scavino.

Friday morning, Scavino was one of the Trump allies tweeting about Twitter’s focus on flagging the president’s tweets.

“Twitter targets the President of the United States 24/7, as they turn their heads to protest organizers who plan, plan and communicate their next moves on this platform every day,” Scavino tweeted. “Twitter is full of s *** – more and more people are starting to get it.”

Scavino responded to Twitter’s most recent move to curb the president.

At 1 a.m. on Friday, Trump tweeted about the Minneapolis race unrest after police killed George Floyd, a black man.

“These THUGS dishonor the memory of George Floyd, and I’m not going to let that happen,” Trump wrote.

“I just spoke to Governor Tim Walz and told him the army is with him all the time. Any difficulty and we will take control, but when the looting starts, the shooting starts. Thank you!’ Trump added.

A few hours later, Twitter issued a warning to the tweet that it was violating the social media company’s rules about “glorifying violence.”

When the official White House account literally tweeted the president’s words, Twitter hit the same warning on that tweet as well.

The president was initially upset with Twitter for marking two tweets he wrote about the dangers of voting by mail – Trump claims this would lead to widespread fraud.

For the first time, Twitter checked those tweets for facts and accused the President of spreading misinformation.

This move came after the company refused to remove tweets Trump had written and pushed a conspiracy theory that Joe Scarborough murdered a former assistant who died in one of his satellite offices in 2001.

Her widower, Timothy Klausutis, had written to Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey begging him to remove Trump’s tweets, but he declined.

Reporters were first notified of the social media-themed executive order when they traveled with President Trump aboard Air Force One from Florida one day after Twitter’s first fact-checking.

Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany returned to the press to inform journalists that the President would sign an EO later in the evening, but she was unable to provide details about the formulation of the order.

Later, communications director Alyssa Farah told the group that Trump would sign the EO on Thursday.

A draft of the warrant leaked to Protocol on Wednesday evening and looked much the same as the contract Trump signed on Thursday with Attorney General Bill Barr by his side.

“It reads like a rough sketch, and in many cases it does,” the White House of Protocol source said.

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