Trump signs an executive order to punish countries or people who try to interfere in the elections

President Donald Trump signed an executive order on electoral interference

President Donald Trump has signed an executive order that would allow his administration to target individuals or nations who intend to interfere in US elections, by sending a signal to Russia and others following efforts to meddle in their own election.

The order comes two months before Americans go to the polls in the elections that will determine congressional control, which could dramatically resize the balance of power in Washington.

The sanctions would focus not only on foreign meddling in the physical infrastructure of the elections, but also on propaganda and other tactics, following the efforts of a team supported by the Kremlin to use Facebook and other social networks to create divisions and affect the public opinion.

President Donald Trump signed an executive order on electoral interference

President Donald Trump signed an executive order on electoral interference

"We felt it was important to show that the president is taking control of this issue," Trump's national security adviser John Bolton said in a call to reporters.

"That is something that matters to him because the integrity of our elections and our constitutional process are a high priority for him," Bolton said.

Trump's order states: "I, DONALD J. TRUMP, President of the United States of America, consider the ability of persons located, in whole or in part substantial, outside the United States to interfere with or undermine trust. Public election in the United States, including through unauthorized access to electoral and campaign infrastructure or disguised distribution of propaganda and misinformation, constitutes an unusual and extraordinary threat to national security and United States foreign policy.

The director of National Intelligence, Dan Coats, told reporters in a call organized by the White House that the current threat is "just a click of the keyboard."

But he said: "We have not seen the intensity of what happened in 2016," when the US intelligence community UU He determined that there was an effort supported by Russia.

"We felt it was important to show that the president is taking control of this issue," Trump's national security adviser John Bolton said in a call to reporters.

The Director of National Intelligence, Dan Coats, said: "We have seen signals not only from Russia, but also from China, possibly from Iran and even from North Korea, so the others incorporate, it is more than Russia here what we are seeing & # 39;

The Director of National Intelligence, Dan Coats, said: "We have seen signals not only from Russia, but also from China, possibly from Iran and even from North Korea, so the others incorporate, it is more than Russia here what we are seeing & # 39;

The Director of National Intelligence, Dan Coats, said: "We have seen signals not only from Russia, but also from China, possibly from Iran and even from North Korea, so the others incorporate, it is more than Russia here what we are seeing & # 39;

Coats added: "We have seen signals not only from Russia, but also from China, possibly from Iran and even from North Korea, then the others join, it is more than Russia here what we are seeing."

The co-chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, Mark Warner, of Virginia, immediately issued the executive order of insufficient because of the exemption granted to the executive, saying that Trump can not be trusted to rise up. ; before Russian President Vladimir Putin.

"Although the administration has not yet shared the full text, an executive order that inevitably leaves the president ample discretion to decide whether to impose harsh sanctions against those who attack our democracy is insufficient," Warner said in a statement after the order was announced. for the first time. .

"Unfortunately, President Trump demonstrated in Helsinki and elsewhere that he can not be counted on to appear before Putin when it matters," Warner said.

Under the order, the intelligence community would have 45 days to determine if an intrusion occurred. He would then submit a report to the officials of the Department of Justice and the Department of Homeland Security, who would then make their own determination.

"This is clearly a process put in place to try to ensure that we are doing everything possible to prevent any interference in our choice," Coats said.

According to Bolton, sanctions vary from blocked assets, export licenses, access to banking and credit services, credit transfers or US investors. UU The text of the order has not yet been published.

Coats declined to indicate directly whether Energy Secretary Rick Perry, who is visiting Moscow this week, was carrying an additional message about Russian meddling. Bolton issued his own severe public warning in August after meeting with his Russian counterpart.

"I will not address why Secretary Perry is in Moscow, I think the Department of Energy made a clear statement of what his role is there," he said when asked by DailyMail.com about the high-level visit, the first since Trump Summit in Helsinki.

Coats also declined to say whether he still received a full report of what Trump and Putin discussed at their individual meeting, after telling reporters at the White House last month that he was not in a position to fully understand & # 39; 39; what happened there.

"In relation to everything the president and I discussed in the Oval Office, or anywhere, it's something I do not analyze in public," Coats said when asked directly about it.

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