Trump says that he & # 39; no idea & # 39; if appointments can be made with …

WASHINGTON (AP) – When the partial blockade of the government ended up in the record books, members of the Congress had left the city, no negotiations had been planned and two-chairman Donald Trump had been tweeted in the void.

The president did not give a tip on Saturday to ask if he would continue with an emergency statement that could break the deadlock, free money for his wall without the approval of the US Congress and legal challenges and a political storm over the use of that extraordinary step. A day earlier he said he was not ready to do it right now & # 39; to do.

Lawmakers are back in Washington from their states and congress districts in the new week.

Trump fired a series of tweets that pushed back the idea that he had no strategy to put an end to what was the longest government breakdown in American history when it entered its 22nd day on Saturday. "Elections have consequences!" he stated, what the 2016 election means "I promised safety and security" and, as part of that, a boundary wall.

But there was another election, in November, and the consequence is that Democrats now control the house and refuse to give Trump money for a wall.

Trump threatened again that the shutdown could continue indefinitely. Later on Saturday, he added tweets for a day by telephoning to Fox News Channel & # 39; s "Justice with Judge Jeanine" Pirro of the White House to continue his public relations blitz on the wall. Pirro pressed Trump on the reason why he had not yet declared a national emergency. He said that he gives Congress a chance to act responsibly & # 39 ;.

President Donald Trump attends a round table discussion on Friday 11 January 2019 on border security with local leaders in the White House cabinet in Washington. (AP Photo / Jacquelyn Martin)

President Donald Trump attends a round table discussion on Friday 11 January 2019 on border security with local leaders in the White House cabinet in Washington. (AP Photo / Jacquelyn Martin)

Trump also said that he has "no idea" whether he can make a deal with landlord Nancy Pelosi, who opposes spending money on an "ineffective, wasteful wall."

The president is expected to sign legislation in the new week that Congress has adopted to repay for approximately 800,000 federal workers who are not paid during the shutdown. Paychecks were on Friday, but many employees got stubs with zeros.

State Secretary Mike Pompeo, who was traveling in Abu Dhabi on Saturday, claimed that it is morally good among American diplomats, even if many work without pay. "We are doing our best to ensure that this does not affect our diplomacy," he said.

Nearly half of the employees of the US Department of Foreign Affairs and about a quarter abroad were eliminated during the shutdown. With the exception of certain local employees abroad, the rest work without paying, such as those charged with supporting Pompeo's journey, which has so far brought him to Jordan, Iraq, Egypt and Bahrain, with even more delay.

An emergency statement by Trump could break the stalemate by allowing him to use existing, non-existent money to build the US and Mexico border wall without permission from the US Congress. Democrats are against that step, but may not be able to stop it. Many Republicans are also wary.

In spite of this, the administration has accelerated the planning for this. Officers sold diversion of money from a series of bills, including $ 13.9 billion to Army Corps of Engineers after the deadly hurts and floods of last year. That option seemed to lose steam after an eruption.

Other options included the withdrawal of funds for power reduction, such as money seized by drug cranes, according to a republican republic that was not competent to speak publicly about private conversations. The White House also looked at military building money, another politically difficult choice because it would eliminate a backlog of hundreds of projects.

Trump has been advised by external advisors to declare a national emergency for the crisis & # 39; which he says exists at the southern border. This is because polls suggest that Trump gets the biggest debt for the shutdown.

But some in the White House try to put the brakes on. Jared Kushner was one of the opponents of the statement, and he argued against his father-in-law that the pursuit of a broader immigration deal was a better option. A person who was familiar with thinking in the White House said that during meetings last week the message was that the administration is in no hurry and wants to consider different options. The person was unauthorized to discuss private sessions and spoke on condition of anonymity.

Pelosi argued that Trump is only trying to divert attention from the special research of Robert Mueller and other problems with the White House. "This is a big distraction, and he is a master in distraction," she told reporters.

Trump has told advisers that he believes that the battle for the wall, even if he never gets money for it, is a political victory for him.

Some external advisors who want him to announce a national emergency say that it can have two benefits.

First, it would enable him to claim that he was the one who had to act to reopen the government. Secondly, inevitable legal challenges would bring the case to court so that Trump could continue the struggle around the wall-and his supporters continue to get excited-while he does not really close the government or immediately demand that he begin construction.

But while that could end the impasse and enable Congress to move to other priorities, some Republicans believe that such a statement would take over the power of Congress and could lead to future democratic presidents taking similar steps to to improve liberal priorities.

"Most conservatives want this to be the last resort that he would use," Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., A leader of the conservative House Freedom Caucus who regularly speaks to Trump. "But those same conservatives, I'm sure if it's being deployed, he would embrace if all he could do was to negotiate with Democrats."

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Writers from Associated Press Catherine Lucey, Colleen Long, Alan Fram, Lolita Baldor, Zeke Miller and Laurie Kellman in Washington and Matthew Lee in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, contributed to this report.

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For AP & # 39; s full coverage of the US government closure: https://apnews.com/GovernmentShutdown

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., Talk to reporters after signing a House-appropriate bill that requires all government employees to be paid retroactively after the partial closure ends, at the Capitol in Washington, Friday, January 11, 2019 She is accompanied by, from the left, Delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton, DD.C., Rep. Peter DeFazio, D-Ore., Rep. Anthony Brown, D-Md., And Rep. Don Beyer D-Va. (AP Photo / J. Scott Applewhite)

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., Talk to reporters after signing a House-appropriate bill that requires all government employees to be paid retroactively after the partial closure ends, at the Capitol in Washington, Friday, January 11, 2019 She is accompanied by, from the left, Delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton, DD.C., Rep. Peter DeFazio, D-Ore., Rep. Anthony Brown, D-Md., And Rep. Don Beyer D-Va. (AP Photo / J. Scott Applewhite)

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., Talk to reporters after signing a House-appropriate bill that requires all government employees to be paid retroactively after the partial closure ends, at the Capitol in Washington, Friday, January 11, 2019 She is accompanied by, from the left, Delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton, DD.C., Rep. Peter DeFazio, D-Ore., Rep. Anthony Brown, D-Md., And Rep. Don Beyer D-Va. (AP Photo / J. Scott Applewhite)

David Pritchett, a leave employee from the US Bureau of Land Management, looks like Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto, D-Nev., Talk to reporters on Friday 11 January 2019 in her office in Reno about the consequences of the partial government closure. Pritchett, a BLM planner in Reno, says the consequences of the closure will have a wrinkly effect on federal land management, long after the government has fully reopened due to deadlines missed for federal permits for a whole range of projects, from gold mines to large recreational events. (AP Photo / Scott Sonner)

David Pritchett, a leave employee from the US Bureau of Land Management, looks like Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto, D-Nev., Talk to reporters on Friday 11 January 2019 in her office in Reno about the consequences of the partial government closure. Pritchett, a BLM planner in Reno, says the consequences of the closure will have a wrinkly effect on federal land management, long after the government has fully reopened due to deadlines missed for federal permits for a whole range of projects, from gold mines to large recreational events. (AP Photo / Scott Sonner)

David Pritchett, a leave employee from the US Bureau of Land Management, looks like Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto, D-Nev., Talk to reporters on Friday 11 January 2019 in her office in Reno about the consequences of the partial government closure. Pritchett, a BLM planner in Reno, says the consequences of the closure will have a wrinkly effect on federal land management, long after the government has fully reopened due to deadlines missed for federal permits for a whole range of projects, from gold mines to large recreational events. (AP Photo / Scott Sonner)

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