Trump said Salisbury's novichok attack was & # 39; part of legitimate espionage games & # 39;

Trump said Salisbury novichok attack was part of legitimate espionage games because he expressed his reluctance to expel Russians about it, to report claims

  • Deputy CIA director, Gina Haspel, used snapshots of poisoned children to convince him
  • More than 100 Russian diplomats were deported from the US and 22 other countries
  • Former spy Sergei Skripal and daughter Yulia were poisoned in Salisbury last March

President Donald Trump reportedly believed that the Novichok attack in Salisbury was part of legitimate spy competitions and was reluctant to expel US Russians over it.

The then deputy CIA director, Gina Haspel, convinced Trump to expel 60 Russians after ex-spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia were poisoned.

The former Russian intelligence officer, 67, and Yulia, 34, were immersed in stores on March 4 last year.

In the aftermath of the attack, which has been blamed by a Russian intelligence agency, more than 100 diplomats were sent from the United States and 22 other countries, although the country refused.

President Donald Trump reportedly believed that the Novichok attack in Salisbury was part of legitimate spy competitions and was reluctant to expel US Russians over it

President Donald Trump reportedly believed that the Novichok attack in Salisbury was part of legitimate spy competitions and was reluctant to expel US Russians over it

Germany, France and Poland each expelled four diplomats, including Lithuania, Latvia and the Czech Republic.

Ukraine – not an EU state – joined the European uprising by expelling thirteen diplomats.

Trump believed the attacks were part of legitimate espionage games, unsavory but within the limits of espionage, the New York Times reports.

He was only convinced to deport the 60 diplomats after Haspel showed him pictures of young children admitted to the hospital by novichok, as well as ducks accidentally killed in Salisbury by the nerve agent.

He was only convinced to deport the 60 diplomats after Haspel showed him pictures of young children admitted to the hospital by Novichok. Pictured: Russian secret service agents Anatoliy Chepiga and Dr. Alexander Mishkin, who are believed to have poisoned the Skripals

He was only convinced to deport the 60 diplomats after Haspel showed him pictures of young children admitted to the hospital by Novichok. Pictured: Russian secret service agents Anatoliy Chepiga and Dr. Alexander Mishkin, who are believed to have poisoned the Skripals

He was only convinced to deport the 60 diplomats after Haspel showed him pictures of young children admitted to the hospital by Novichok. Pictured: Russian secret service agents Anatoliy Chepiga and Dr. Alexander Mishkin, who are believed to have poisoned the Skripals

& # 39; Mr. Trump fixed himself on the pictures of the sick children and the dead ducks. At the end of the briefing, he embraced the strong option, & # 39; added the New York Times.

In June, Salisbury received a second Novichok poisoning, killing the mother of three Dawn Sturgess, 44, and seriously injuring her partner Charlie Rowley, 45.

A fake perfume bottle Nina Ricci – which was processed by Sturgess – is supposed to contain the substance.

Evidence gathered by intelligence services led the government to decide the perpetrators to be officers of the Russian military intelligence service, the GRU.

Russian secret service agents Anatoliy Chepiga and Dr. Alexander Mishkin are said to have placed the Novichok at Mr Skripal's house.

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