Trump rape prosecutor E. Jean Carroll drags him over the Manhattan DA grand jury

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Donald Trump’s prosecutor E. Jean Carroll is cheating on him on Twitter after Manhattan prosecutors announced they would convene a grand jury to consider whether they would indict him in a large-scale criminal investigation into his business practices.

“ Trump’s DNA will be easier to get when he’s with Rikers, ” said Carroll – who is suing Trump for defaming her when she came forward to accuse him of sexually assaulting her in a department store locker room in 1996 – joked Tuesday in response to an article about the grand jury.

Lawyers for Carroll, 77, battled for months to get Trump to file a DNA sample in her lawsuit that could be compared to the unidentified male DNA on the dress she was wearing on the day of the alleged attack.

In court documents, Carroll’s lawyers have accused Trump of pulling out all the stops and doing everything they can to avoid being impeached and providing a DNA sample.

“ From the very beginning, however, Trump has done everything he can to prevent the truth from coming out, ” the lawyers wrote in an April 16 filing with the federal appeals court.

In her mocking tweet on Tuesday, Carroll suggested that Trump ending up behind bars in the Manhattan district attorney’s separate probe could make it easier to finally force him to comply in her case.

Donald Trump's prosecutor E. Jean Carroll cheats on him on Twitter after Manhattan prosecutors announced they would convene a grand jury to consider indicting him in a large-scale criminal investigation into his business practices

Trump has denied any wrongdoing in the rape allegations and the criminal case, saying all investigations into him are just further examples of democratic witch hunts.

Donald Trump’s prosecutor E. Jean Carroll (left) cheats on him on Twitter after Manhattan prosecutors announced they would convene a grand jury to consider whether to indict the former president (left) in a sweeping criminal analysis of his business practices

Carroll's attorneys accused the DOJ of trying to slow down the progress of the case, including Carroll's attempt to get a DNA sample from Trump to see if it matches male genetic material on a dress they they said they wore on the day of the alleged attack (photo)

Carroll’s attorneys accused the DOJ of trying to slow down the progress of the case, including Carroll’s attempt to get a DNA sample from Trump to see if it matches male genetic material on a dress they they said they wore on the day of the alleged attack (photo)

The alleged incident involving Carroll, a former Elle magazine columnist, and Trump took place in the mid-1990s, but Carroll remained silent about it until 2019 with the support of the #MeToo movement.

When she finally published her claims, Trump, who was then president, attacked her and accused her of lying to sell her new book, saying, “She’s not my type.”

Trump is facing a similar defamation lawsuit against Summer Zervos (pictured), a former contestant on his reality TV show The Apprentice

Trump is facing a similar defamation lawsuit against Summer Zervos (pictured), a former contestant on his reality TV show The Apprentice

Carroll is one of more than two dozen women who have publicly accused Trump of sexual misconduct that they say happened in the years before he became president.

He is also in the midst of another defamation lawsuit filed by another prosecutor, Summer Zervos, a former apprentice contestant who accused him of forcibly kissing and groping her in a California hotel in 2007. Trump denied the charges.

Carroll’s lawyers have repeatedly referred to the Zervos case as evidence of Trump’s pattern of dodging justice by claiming he was protected by his presidency.

Other prosecutors include a former model who claims Trump sexually assaulted her in the 1997 US Open tennis tournament; a former Miss Universe contestant who said Trump touched her in 2006; and a reporter who claims that Trump forcibly kissed her in 2005 without her permission at his Mar-a-Lago resort.

Trump has denied the allegations and called them politically motivated.

The former president is fending off those lawsuits while dealing with Manhattan’s more recent criminal investigation into his business practices.

Investigators are investigating whether the Trump organization manipulated the value of its real estate portfolio to defraud banks and insurance companies, and whether any tax breaks were obtained through the evaluations.

A grand jury will now decide whether Trump, other executives of the Trump Organization and / or the company itself, can be prosecuted. The Washington Post reported.

Trump responded to the grand jury’s announcement by saying the criminal case is also “ purely political. ”

In September, after several unsuccessful attempts by Trump’s lawyers to dismiss or delay Carroll’s case, U.S. Department of Justice officials under his administration took the unusual step of asking the administration to replace Trump as defendant in the case. .

Justice Department attorneys argued that, under federal law, Trump, like any typical government employee, is entitled to immunity from civil lawsuits while performing his job. They argued that he was acting in his capacity as president when he said that Carroll was lying.

Legal experts said it was unprecedented for the Justice Department to defend a president for his behavior before taking office.

When Judge Lewis Kaplan of the Federal District Court in Manhattan rejected that argument, the Justice Department appealed. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit has not yet ruled on it.

Trump claimed he never met Carroll, but the advisory columnist and author filed photographic evidence they had in the lawsuit.  The photo above shows Trump and first wife Ivana (left and right) with Carroll and her then-husband John Johnson (center)

Trump claimed he never met Carroll, but the advisory columnist and author filed photographic evidence they had in the lawsuit. The photo above shows Trump and first wife Ivana (left and right) with Carroll and her then-husband John Johnson (center)

According to the complaint, the alleged rape took place more than two decades ago, when Carroll said she randomly crossed paths with Trump at Bergdorf Goodman’s Manhattan store.

Carroll, who hosted a TV talk show at the time, said Trump recognized her, and the two talked, she said.

Trump asked her to choose a present for an unknown woman, and they ended up in the lingerie department. After asking her to try on a suit, Trump reportedly closed the door in a locker room, pressed her against a wall, unzipped his pants and assaulted her, according to the complaint.

Carroll said she told two friends about the alleged attack shortly after it took place but did not report Trump to the police, fearing retaliation from the wealthy and well-connected businessman.

Decades later, Carroll came out with her story in a June 2019 New York Magazine article adapted from a new book What Do We Need Men For? A modest proposal.

She said she was inspired to narrate the incident by the #MeToo movement, which encouraged women to share their experiences of sexual assault and harassment.

Carroll detailed her allegations against Trump in New York magazine, appearing on the cover (photo) in the same coat she claimed to be wearing the day Trump allegedly attacked her.

Carroll detailed her allegations against Trump in New York magazine, appearing on the cover (photo) in the same coat she claimed to be wearing the day Trump allegedly attacked her.

In photos taken for that story, at the request of the magazine’s photography director, Carroll wore the same black Donna Karan dress she said she had worn on the day Trump allegedly attacked her.

When Carroll filed her lawsuit later in 2019, her attorney, Kaplan, had a security guard accompany her to get the dress out of her closet for forensics.

In January 2020, the results came back and found the DNA of an unidentified male on the shoulder and sleeves.

If the dress had traces of Trump’s DNA, it wouldn’t prove his guilt. But a match could be used as evidence that he was in contact with the dress and to rebut his claims that he never met Carroll, according to two forensic experts not involved in the case.

“How his DNA got on that dress would be the argument,” said Monte Miller, a biochemist who leads a DNA analysis consultancy and previously worked at the Texas Department of Public Safety’s State Crime Laboratory.

“It’s up to the lawyers and the courts and everyone else to discuss why it is there and how it got there.”

Carroll said she is sure the DNA is on Trump’s dress and she wants her day in court. She said she now sleeps with a gun next to her bed because she has received death threats since she publicly accused Trump.

“This defamation case is not about me,” said Carroll, who regularly meets other women who have accused Trump of sexual misconduct. It is about every woman ‘who cannot speak’.

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