Trump mocks the New York Times before the Montana rally

President Donald Trump mocked the New York Times in a tweet when he landed in Billing, Montana on Thursday (pictured above) before a rally

President Donald Trump has promised to unmask the senior government official who broke ranks to claim anonymously in a New York Times op-ed that a "resistance" of assistants was trying to subvert the president's worst instincts for the good of the country.

After landing in Billings, Montana on Thursday night before a Republican rally, DailyMail.com asked Trump how he planned to uncover the identity of the disloyal officer.

& # 39; Let's try it! & # 39; he shouted, over the noise of an Air Force member idling.

The president had mocked the newspaper moments before in a tweet asking if the Times would investigate itself about the anonymous opinion writer.

"Will the New York Times investigative" journalists "investigate themselves? Who is the anonymous letter writer? Trump tweeted.

President Donald Trump mocked the New York Times in a tweet when he landed in Billing, Montana on Thursday (pictured above) before a rally

President Donald Trump mocked the New York Times in a tweet when he landed in Billing, Montana on Thursday (pictured above) before a rally

It is very likely that Trump will get into the article when he speaks at the rally in support of state auditor Matt Rosendale, who is trying to overthrow Democratic Senator Jon Tester in the midterm elections.

It occurs when Trump's senior advisers rushed to deny the column that criticized the president's leadership style as impetuous, petty and ineffective.

Trump seemed content most of the day as he watched the drama of a mice hunt across Washington on television and Twitter, and consumed appreciatively the reports of cabinet members denying any involvement in the news bomb.

A White House official said in the afternoon that the president "would probably go there in Montana," anticipating a disappointment over the opinion article.

But the official did not predict Trump's willingness to ask questions from the press about who he was and who was not under suspicion.

Trump approached Marine One in South Lawn without approaching a group of waiting reporters.

At Joint Base Andrews, he progressed methodically up the Air Force One staircase, never approaching a traveling press corps that shouted questions about how he would unmask his Judas from deep state.

And despite an almost four-hour flight to the upper plains, he did not go to the cabin in the aft cabin to talk.

Instead, reporters were invited to a continuous stream of Fox News Channel as the network reported an increasingly long list of Cabinet officials and other members of Trump A who denied having anything to do with the Times' essay.

The unsigned column generated disapprovals from at least 11 Trump advisers, including Vice President Mike Pence, Russian Ambassador Jon Huntsman, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Defense Secretary James Mattis.

Trump became infuriated by the piece and framed it as a blow from critics in denial of its successes, while Washington was consumed with speculation about who wrote the opinion piece.

First Lady Melania Trump said in a statement on Twitter: "For the writer of the oped, he is not protecting this country, he is sabotaging it with his cowardly actions."

A second White House official said on Thursday that West Wing aides could not wait for the president to leave the city, knowing he would "lower the building's blood pressure and give it a restart" in an atmosphere in which it stands out. .

Trump needed a rally to publicly shake his Etch-a-Sketch after a week of revelations that hit his team like a series of kidney strokes.

Trump's top advisers have struggled to deny the opinion article in the Times on Wednesday that criticized the president's leadership style as impetuous, petty and ineffective.

Trump's top advisers have struggled to deny the opinion article in the Times on Wednesday that criticized the president's leadership style as impetuous, petty and ineffective.

Trump's top advisers have struggled to deny the opinion article in the Times on Wednesday that criticized the president's leadership style as impetuous, petty and ineffective.

First came excerpts from the next journalist Bob Woodward & # 39; Fear & # 39 ;, which depicts the president as a poorly prepared and crude leader whose lack of impulse control prompted senior advisers to protect him from himself.

In one vignette, Woodward describes the then chief economic adviser, Gary Cohn, literally slipping a draft memorandum from the Resolute Table to thwart Trump's goal of ending a crucial Korean trade deal.

Knocking down the long-standing agreement would have introduced uncertainty in Washington's relationship with Seoul and could have jeopardized the United States' use of South Korean real estate for an ambitious missile detection program.

The internal repercussions of the Cohn case in the west wing had barely passed from panic to simple shock when The New York Times twisted the knife.

The publication of the unsigned opinion article on Wednesday, which according to the Times was written by a senior administration official, yielded a variation on the same subject.

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