Trump administration wants to send migrants to Mexico to wait for a ruling on their asylum applications

The Trump government is preparing to take advantage of a court ruling that allows the government to send Central American migrants to Mexico to wait for a ruling on their asylum applications

  • Donald Trump's government is preparing to take advantage of a federal court ruling that may send Central American migrants back to Mexico
  • It sent some to wait to process their asylum applications to a court this month that it had to stop the policy
  • A federal court of appeal based on San Francisco ruled in favor of the administration's request to lift an order while a legal battle continues
  • Report says US Citizenship and Immigration Service has advised employees to prepare for the return of migrants on the other side of the southern border
  • The lifting of the order was only temporary and the case is still in court

Donald Trump's government wants to take advantage of a federal court ruling that it can send Central American migrants back to Mexico to assess their asylum applications.

A federal court of appeal based on San Francisco broke with precedent and ruled in favor of the administration's request to lift an order, while a legal battle over the & # 39; Remain in Mexico & # 39; approach continues.

The LA Times reports that US citizenship and immigration services have advised employees to prepare for migrants' return to the Mexican side of the southern border.

A memo obtained on Monday at the point of sale refers to the policy as & # 39; Migrant Protection Protocols & # 39; and says they can resume pending pending pending litigation & # 39 ;.

Donald Trump's government wants to take advantage of a federal court ruling that it can send Central American migrants back to Mexico to assess their asylum applications.

Donald Trump's government wants to take advantage of a federal court ruling that it can send Central American migrants back to Mexico to assess their asylum applications.

Last Friday, the Ninth Circuit granted the Trump administration a stay that allowed the policy to resume pending a final decision. The court will decide this week whether to continue with the policies that Trump believes are necessary to prevent illegal immigrants from crossing the border.

In a report from Monday, the LA Times reported that the administration had not acted on the restored authority.

A Ministry of Homeland Security spokesperson did not respond to DailyMail.com's request for comment on the report – or a Trump tweet on Monday claiming that migrants would be deposed in & # 39; sanctuary towns & # 39; after they were taken into custody.

Justice told the LA Times that the president has the right to send Central American migrants back to Mexico, and it would be his right to have it defended.

& # 39; The statute that explicitly allows migration protocols to be used for migrants has been in the books for more than 20 years and the Justice Department will vigorously defend our ability to use it & # 39 ;, said spokeswoman DOJ.

DOJ had previously argued that the order of a court in a district that ceased practice imposed immediate, substantial damage to the United States, including through the ability of the executive to work effectively with Mexico in the crisis control, reduce & # 39; at our common border.

The Trump administration started the protocols in December to meet the President's desire to reduce the number of free roaming migrants.

Earlier this month, a court ruled that the administration cannot force asylum seekers to leave the country until their cases are closed.

Before the order, the government had sent more than 1,000 migrants to Mexico to wait to process their asylum applications.

The White House claimed last Monday that it was a & # 39; collaboration program that had been extensively negotiated with Mexico & # 39; and that a court was wrong about & # 39; an open border policy & # 39; to force an American population that supports stricter immigration legislation.

& # 39; Congress has passed a federal law allowing the return of illegal and inadmissible aliens to Mexico while awaiting asylum hearings – preventing them from being released into the interior of the United States & # 39 ;, White House.

Central American migrants leaving for the US in a caravan are waiting in Tapachula on Monday. Mexican authorities say the caravan has made its way

Central American migrants leaving for the US in a caravan are waiting in Tapachula on Monday. Mexican authorities say the caravan has made its way

Central American migrants leaving for the US in a caravan are waiting in Tapachula on Monday. Mexican authorities say the caravan has made its way

When the Ninth Circuit, which often runs counter to the administration, decided that Trump could continue the policy why the matter is being discussed, he celebrated with a tweet that said: & # 39; Finally, great news at the border! & # 39;

Migrants who have crossed the border to places like Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez have told NBC News that they are worried about overcrowded camps and violence by force groups.

In a statement about the court's order to stop the trial, the White House argued that the & # 39; action was seriously undermining & # 39; the President's ability to tackle the border crisis. & # 39; It argued that Trump only uses the & # 39; tools that Congress has approved & # 39; and that the court decision & # 39; disrupts the conduct of our foreign affairs & # 39 ;.

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