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Tropical Storm Bertha lands on the South Carolina coast with winds of 50 mph

Tropical Storm Bertha arrived a few hours after the official landfall on the South Carolina coast on Wednesday morning and became the second named storm to strike for the official start of this year’s Atlantic hurricane season.

The tropical storm has already brought three days of torrential rains and holiday weekends that brought floods to Florida before heading up the coast and landing in South Carolina around 9:30 a.m. EST, centered about 40 miles northeast of Charleston, with sustained winds near 50 mph.

A tropical storm warning was issued off the coast of South Carolina, and the storm is said to cause heavy rainfall in some areas with up to 20 inches of rain, according to the US National Hurricane Center.

The storm is moving north near 15 mph and is expected to weaken to a tropical depression after inland movement.

Tropical Storm Bertha landed on the coast of South Carolina, about 40 miles northeast of Charleston, at 9:30 a.m. EST, with sustained winds near 50 mph. The storm hit the country less than two hours after it was named Bertha by the National Hurricane Center. A satellite view of the storm that is about to land at 7:40 AM EST

Tropical Storm Bertha landed on the coast of South Carolina, about 40 miles northeast of Charleston, at 9:30 a.m. EST, with sustained winds near 50 mph. The storm hit the country less than two hours after it was named Bertha by the National Hurricane Center. A satellite view of the storm that is about to land at 7:40 AM EST

Satellite view of Tropical Storm Bertha taken on Wednesday at 10:10 am dangerously swirling near the Florida and South Carolina coastline

Satellite view of Tropical Storm Bertha taken on Wednesday at 10:10 am dangerously swirling near the Florida and South Carolina coastline

Satellite view of Tropical Storm Bertha taken on Wednesday at 10:10 am dangerously swirling near the Florida and South Carolina coastline

The tropical storm brought torrential rain and flooding to Florida over Memorial Day weekend. A woman saw herself walking in massive food in Miami on Tuesday evening after three days of brutal rain more than eight inches

The tropical storm brought torrential rain and flooding to Florida over Memorial Day weekend. A woman saw herself walking in massive food in Miami on Tuesday evening after three days of brutal rain more than eight inches

The tropical storm brought torrential rain and flooding to Florida over Memorial Day weekend. A woman saw herself walking in massive food in Miami on Tuesday evening after three days of brutal rain more than eight inches

A man cycles while holding an umbrella as Tropical Storm Bertha rain flooded a few streets in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday morning

A man cycles while holding an umbrella as Tropical Storm Bertha rain flooded a few streets in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday morning

A man cycles while holding an umbrella as Tropical Storm Bertha rain flooded a few streets in Charleston, South Carolina on Wednesday morning

The storm landed less than two hours after it was named by the Hurricane Center.

According to Accuweather, Bertha is listed as less than a Category 1 storm.

The storm caused minor flooding in Charleston with a few streets closed on Wednesday morning. But the city, which is flooded dozens of times a year, got worse problems from an unnamed storm that dropped heavy rain last week.

Residents along America Street in Charleston woke up Wednesday at a crossroads that had become a water-filled canal.

Cars that were on the curb had water up to their doors, bins overflowed, and dirty diapers, magazines, and food scraps clogged the drain in the area.

The storm is expected to head inland quickly and generally spread one to three inches of rain, but may plunge in some areas of eastern South Carolina in North Carolina and Virginia on Wednesday evening.

“This rainfall can cause life-threatening flooding,” said the Hurricane Center.

This map shows how Bertha caused flood warnings in Florida, South Carolina, and North Carolina

This map shows how Bertha caused flood warnings in Florida, South Carolina, and North Carolina

This map shows how Bertha caused flood warnings in Florida, South Carolina, and North Carolina

There are flood warnings for Roanoke, Greensboro, Charlotte, Florence and Myrtle Beach

There are flood warnings for Roanoke, Greensboro, Charlotte, Florence and Myrtle Beach

There are flood warnings for Roanoke, Greensboro, Charlotte, Florence and Myrtle Beach

This map shows the trajectory of Bertha that is expected to swirl to North Carolina around 2 a.m.

This map shows the trajectory of Bertha that is expected to swirl to North Carolina around 2 a.m.

This map shows the trajectory of Bertha that is expected to swirl to North Carolina around 2 a.m.

A Miami resident imagined himself flooding on Tuesday during torrential rainfall in Miami

A Miami resident imagined himself flooding on Tuesday during torrential rainfall in Miami

A Miami resident imagined himself flooding on Tuesday during torrential rainfall in Miami

A woman posing while carrying her dog as it was unable to walk in the flooded streets of Miami Beach Florida due to heavy rainfall in Miami-Dade County amid sudden flood warnings

A woman posing while carrying her dog because it was unable to walk in the flooded streets of Miami Beach Florida due to torrential rain in Miami-Dade County amid sudden flood warnings

A woman posing while carrying her dog as it was unable to walk in the flooded streets of Miami Beach Florida due to heavy rainfall in Miami-Dade County amid sudden flood warnings

Bertha brought record rains to some Florida communities. Miami recorded 7.43 inches of rain over the holiday weekend, while West Palm Beach broke its daily rain record Monday when 4.44 inches of rain was recorded. A man imagined how his car would be towed in high water in Miami on Monday

Bertha brought record rains to some Florida communities. Miami recorded 7.43 inches of rain over the holiday weekend, while West Palm Beach broke its daily rain record Monday when 4.44 inches of rain was recorded. A man imagined how his car would be towed in high water in Miami on Monday

Bertha brought record rains to some Florida communities. Miami recorded 7.43 inches of rain over the holiday weekend, while West Palm Beach broke its daily rain record Monday when 4.44 inches of rain was recorded. A man imagined how his car would be towed in high water in Miami on Monday

Motorists struggled to navigate Miami's flooded treats on Memorial Day after days of heavy rain

Motorists struggled to navigate Miami's flooded treats on Memorial Day after days of heavy rain

Motorists struggled to navigate Miami’s flooded treats on Memorial Day after days of heavy rain

A view of the completely flooded streets in Miami Beach, pictured above on Monday

A view of the completely flooded streets in Miami Beach, pictured above on Monday

A view of the completely flooded streets in Miami Beach, pictured above on Monday

The NHC issued a warning of tropical storms off the coast of South Carolina, from Edisto Beach to South Santee River. The Bertha center will go ashore in the warning zone for the next few hours and will move inland later tonight over East and North South Carolina and tonight toward West Central North Carolina, “the NHC said.

Flash flood watches were released because the region already saw a lot of rain in May.

Earlier this month, Tropical Storm Arthur brought rain to North Carolina before heading out to sea. It was the sixth consecutive year that a named storm developed before June 1, the official start of the Atlantic hurricane season.

Florida is recovering from three days of heavy rains, flooding cities like Miami in some areas with more than eight inches of water.

Some locals watched them struggle through knee-deep water as they set out to enjoy Memorial Day weekend and alleviated the limitations of the corona virus.

Flooded street reaching the bumpers of cars in Miami pictured above

Flooded street reaching the bumpers of cars in Miami pictured above

Flooded street reaching the bumpers of cars in Miami pictured above

The flooded streets of downtown Miami, pictured above over the holiday weekend

The flooded streets of downtown Miami, pictured above over the holiday weekend

The flooded streets of downtown Miami, pictured above over the holiday weekend

A man hides under a structure outside of Florida International University during heavy rainfall in Miami on Tuesday

A man hides under a structure outside of Florida International University during heavy rainfall in Miami on Tuesday

A man hides under a structure outside of Florida International University during heavy rainfall in Miami on Tuesday

A man trudges through knee-deep flooding in Miami on Tuesday night. The Flood prevented South Floridians from enjoying the recent reopenings of restaurants, businesses, and beaches after nearly two months of closures due to the corona virus pandemic

A man trudges through knee-deep flooding in Miami on Tuesday night. The Flood prevented South Floridians from enjoying the recent reopenings of restaurants, businesses, and beaches after nearly two months of closures due to the corona virus pandemic

A man trudges through knee-deep flooding in Miami on Tuesday night. The Flood prevented South Floridians from enjoying the recent reopenings of restaurants, businesses, and beaches after nearly two months of closures due to the corona virus pandemic

Bertha brought record rains to some Florida communities.

Miami registered 14.6 inches of rain over the weekend, seven of those inches came in just four hours on Tuesday night, marking the city’s wettest day in eight years since May 2012 when nine inches fell, according to NBC.

Meanwhile, West Palm Beach broke its daily rain record on Monday when 4.44 inches of rain was recorded. Fort Lauderdale also recorded another record rainfall on May 25, with a total of 4.03 inches.

The Flood prevented South Floridians from enjoying the recent reopening of restaurants, businesses, and beaches after nearly two months of closures due to the corona virus pandemic.

The last time there were two named storms before June was in 2016, according to Phil Klotzbach, a research scientist at Colorado State University’s department of atmospheric science. It also happened in 1887, 1908, 1951 and 2012, he said.

“Most of these early season storms are, at least in part, from non-tropical or subtropical processes and don’t necessarily imply anything about the rest of the season,” Klotzbach said.

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