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Trombone player for stars accused by his New York cooperative of hosting ‘drug-fueled parties’ during pandemic

A trombonist to the stars has been accused by his New York cooperative of “outrageous and despicable behavior” for hosting “drug-fueled parties” during the coronavirus pandemic.

Mike Seltzer, 52, who has played with famous faces including Sting, Lenny Kravitz, Mos Def, Bernadette Peters and David Byrnea, is being sued by his fellow shareholders in Hamilton in Harlem for allegedly banning non-essential guests from violated the building during Lockdown.

Seltzer, who owns a penthouse in the 76-unit building, is accused of holding drug parties in his apartment, smuggling guests through the basement and garage, and letting his guests hang out in the halls littered with rooms drugs.

The Hamilton Owners Corporation filed an initial lawsuit against Columbia University faculty member last week, accusing him of not complying with the building’s COVID-19 protocols, the New York Post reported.

Mike Seltzer, 52, (pictured) who has played with famous faces including Sting and Lenny Kravitz, is being sued by his fellow shareholders in Hamilton in Harlem for allegedly ignoring the building's ban on non-essential guests during the closing .

Mike Seltzer, 52, (pictured) who has played with famous faces including Sting and Lenny Kravitz, is being sued by his fellow shareholders in Hamilton in Harlem for allegedly ignoring the building’s ban on nonessential guests during the closing .

The building, said to be home to a number of people who are elderly or have pre-existing health problems, banned all ‘non-essential’ guests entering the building, including family members, in March to help protect residents and staff from coronavirus.

The suit quotes “outrageous and despicable behavior,” claiming that Seltzer ignores social distance rules by hosting drug-fed parties in his penthouse.

The board claims that the musician has sneaked into the building through the basement and garage through unauthorized guests, even when confronted by security guards, and handed his key to guests.

His guests are said to have caused chaos in the building, hanging out in the corridors, sowing drug wastage, pressing the buzzes incessantly and causing nuisance under the influence of drugs and alcohol “possibly a psychedelic or LSD,” the suit claims.

Seltzer’s disregard for the rules is “the lives and safety of residents of the building, some of whom are elderly or who have underlying health problems, are at great risk of serious injury and death,” the trial filed with the Manhattan Supreme Court.

The cooperative cannot evict Seltzer from the building under the leadership of New York City Governor Andrew Cuomo, who will protect tenants from eviction until at least June 20.

The Hamilton cooperative in Harlem. Seltzer, who owns a penthouse in the 76 unit building, has been accused of hosting drug-fueled parties in his apartment, sneaking guests through the basement and garage and allowing his guests to hang out in the halls that are littered with drugs.

The Hamilton cooperative in Harlem. Seltzer, who owns a penthouse in the 76 unit building, has been accused of hosting drug-fueled parties in his apartment, sneaking guests through the basement and garage and allowing his guests to hang out in the halls that are littered with drugs.

The Hamilton cooperative in Harlem. Seltzer, who owns a penthouse in the 76 unit building, has been accused of hosting drug-fueled parties in his apartment, sneaking guests through the basement and garage and allowing his guests to hang out in the halls that are littered with drugs

Seltzer is being sued by the cooperative, who says that his disregard of the rules “puts the lives and safety of the residents of the building, some of whom are elderly or with underlying health problems, at great risk of serious injury and death.” according to the suit

However, Massimo D’Angelo, the plaintiffs’ lawyer, said Hamilton’s council is seeking an emergency ban that will compel Seltzer to follow the building’s rules or to be arrested.

“As soon as the judge signs it, it becomes a court order and I can take him to court in contempt and have him thrown in prison,” D’Angelo told the Post.

A request for comment from Seltzer was not answered, the Post said.

Other New York cooperatives, which allow residents to own shares throughout the building, have introduced strict social distance rules during the state’s closure.

Essential workers such as movers are banned from entering the buildings by some signs.

Doormen wearing masks and gloves deliver food to residents, clean all packages, and even flush toilets in apartments left empty by owners who have fled the city.

Doormen with protective masks are outside a residential building on Central Park South on Tuesday. Other New York cooperatives introduced strict social distance rules during state closure, including banning movers and limiting staff to one porter

Doormen with protective masks are outside a residential building on Central Park South on Tuesday. Other New York cooperatives introduced strict social distance rules during state closure, including banning movers and limiting staff to one porter

Doormen with protective masks are outside a residential building on Central Park South on Tuesday. Other New York cooperatives introduced strict social distance rules during state closure, including banning movers and limiting staff to one porter

In some buildings, they work in dual or triple shifts and cover the workload of doorman, elevator attendant and concierge to reduce the number of staff in the building.

“Those people go home and leave the building at night, so it’s a way to limit exposure to just one person,” real estate agent Philip Scheinfeld told Post.

“I sold an apartment to a customer on Fifth Avenue, and they literally let no one but owners enter the building.”

New York City’s official death toll from the coronavirus pandemic soared Thursday, as another 723 people died, bringing the toll amount to 7,563.

The number of confirmed cases in the city also continues to rise to 117,565.

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