Trolleys, QR codes: radical change ahead for Australian customers

The simple yet HUGE change coming to your grocery store means you NEVER have to scratch for coins in the trolley bay again

  • Shoppers may soon be asked to use a QR code instead of a coin using trolleys
  • Customers can download an app on their smartphone to access the shopping cart
  • Trolleys have built-in GPS navigation that makes it easy to recover the carts


A radical change could be on the way for Australian supermarkets, with major retailers expected to ask customers to use a QR code instead of a coin to access their carts.

A NSW-based company, the Trolley Data Management Network, has designed a new lock where shoppers can use a smartphone app to unlock shopping carts.

A $2 deposit will then be returned once the trolley is returned to its bay.

A radical change is coming soon in Australian supermarkets with major retailers asking customers to use a QR code instead of a coin when using trolleys

The advantage for retailers is that if the trolley is left behind, the app enables store staff to quickly track it down.

“The ability to scan a QR code and make something tangible happen didn’t exist until now,” said Domenic Ammendolia, the founder and CEO.

Mr Ammendolia told Daily Mail Australia that the idea for the system came about when he realized that most consumers paid for everything with a card or smartphone.

“I haven’t had a coin with me in years,” he said.

“The fact that I could do so much with my phone, using Apple Pay and Google Pay to pay for groceries, made me realize what a powerful tool smartphones had become.”

The trolleys have the ability to report their GPS location directly to retailers themselves, a system that can reduce the number of carts dumped in parks, lakes and streets

The trolleys have the ability to report their GPS location directly to retailers themselves, a system that can reduce the number of carts dumped in parks, lakes and streets

Major retailers such as Coles, Woolworths and Aldi could face fines of nearly $14,000 if their carts are not returned to the property

Major retailers such as Coles, Woolworths and Aldi could face fines of nearly $14,000 if their carts are not returned to the property

The trolleys have the ability to provide their GPS location directly to stores themselves, a system that could reduce the number of carts dumped in parks, lakes and streets.

Mr Ammendolia said abandoned carts have been a major problem for a long time, costing retailers more than $20 million a year.

Major chains such as Coles, Woolworths and Aldi can face fines of nearly $14,000 if their carts are not returned to the property.

Under a new law introduced in NSW parliament last week, retailers have three hours to pick up items that pose a safety risk in the community.

If shopping carts are left out in the cold for too long, supermarkets may be asked to cough up fines ranging from $660 to as much as $13,750.

The company's founder, Domenic Ammendolia, told Daily Mail Australia that the idea for the system came about when he realized that most consumers paid for everything with a card or smartphone.

The company’s founder, Domenic Ammendolia, told Daily Mail Australia that the idea for the system came about when he realized that most consumers paid for everything with a card or smartphone.

Under a new law introduced in NSW parliament last week, retailers have three hours to pick up items that pose a safety risk in the community

Under a new law introduced in NSW parliament last week, retailers have three hours to pick up items that pose a safety risk in the community

Mr Ammendolia said carts can be located faster and more efficiently thanks to the accuracy of the GPS tracking system.

The technology has been tested during a five-month trial at a Harris Farm Markets on Sydney’s Northern Beaches and will soon be available from other retailers.

The system has also attracted international attention with UK retailers considering the technology for their own supermarket chains.

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