Transgender agent sues Port Authority for discrimination, claiming his colleagues called him ‘it”

A transgender agent has sued the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, claiming that his colleagues called him “it” and wouldn’t let him switch toilets and locker rooms for six months after the transition.

Michael McConaughey, who has served as an officer at the agency since 2013, filed a lawsuit against his employer on Sunday for being discriminated against in the workplace for being transgender.

McConaughey claims that colleagues purposely referred to him using feminine pronouns and his pre-menopausal name on more than 50 separate occasions after announcing that he had transitioned from female to male.

Complaints to his supervisors and the human resources department about his treatment had “no apparent impact,” while a supervisor retaliated by complaining about McConaughey to his union, according to the lawsuit.

A transgender agent has sued the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, claiming that his colleagues called him “it” and wouldn’t let him switch toilets and locker rooms for six months after the transition. Port Authority officers pictured in New York last May

McConaughey was hired by the Port Authority as a police officer in August 2013 when he publicly identified himself as a woman, the suit states.

In 2018, McConaughey was diagnosed with gender dysphoria and the process of transitioning from a woman to a man began.

That summer, McConaughey told a superior and the human resources department that he was in a transition process and would need to switch to using the men’s locker rooms and restroom, the suit claims.

He then followed up the meetings with a formal written request, he claims.

McConaughey claims he received no response to his request for 30 days and so followed it up with another request.

He was reportedly approached by human resources and asked to hold off on changing changing rooms while the Port Authority’s insurers and legal department approved a new policy, the suit says.

McConaughey claims it took until January 2019 – six months after he first requested to switch facilities – before the Port Authority gave him permission to start using the male facilities.

It then took nearly a year and a half — in July 2020 — for the Port Authority to change McConaughey’s first name and gender identity on its paper and electronic records, uniform and equipment rosters, and court notice, the lawsuit alleges.

The suit says McConaughey officially announced that he had transitioned to male and used masculine pronouns in February 2019, before legally changing his name in May 2019.

Michael McConaughey, who has served as an officer at the agency since 2013, filed a lawsuit (above) against his employer on Sunday, alleging discrimination in the workplace for being transgender.

Michael McConaughey, who has served as an officer at the agency since 2013, filed a lawsuit (above) against his employer on Sunday, alleging discrimination in the workplace for being transgender.

McConaughey alleges that colleagues purposely referred to him using feminine pronouns and his pre-transition name on more than 50 separate occasions after announcing that he had transitioned from female to male

McConaughey claims colleagues purposely referred to him using feminine pronouns and his pre-transition name on more than 50 separate occasions after announcing that he had transitioned from female to male

McConaughey claims several superiors and colleagues, including: Sergeant Joseph Brenneck’deliberately referred to Plaintiff using feminine pronouns and his name before the transition from March, the lawsuit alleges.

The lawsuit also alleges that dozens of McConaughey’s colleagues began insulting or ostracizing him, “including by misnaming him or misnaming him over the Port Authority’s radio communications so that all his colleagues can could hear’.

In an alleged incident last October, McConaughey claimed that a colleague stared at his genitals in the toilet and then called him “it,” “whatever it is,” and a “transvestite” multiple times.

The same colleague is also said to have told colleagues that McConaughey had a “gender change” and had a “rubber dick,” the suit says.

On other alleged occasions, colleagues revealed his former identity to new employees in order to humiliate him.

McConaughey also claims that when he returned to work in May 2019 after an extended leave of absence for gender confirmation surgery, he discovered that some of his sensitive, personal documents had been removed from his desk.

LGBTQ+ activists protest before the Supreme Court in October 2019, when it heard arguments over whether gay and transgender people are covered by a federal law banning gender-based discrimination

LGBTQ+ activists protest before the Supreme Court in October 2019, when it heard arguments over whether gay and transgender people are covered by a federal law banning gender-based discrimination

McConaughey's lawsuit, filed in Manhattan, is one of more than 300 cases citing the landmark June 2020 Supreme Court ruling between Bostock and Clayton County.

McConaughey’s lawsuit, filed in Manhattan, is one of more than 300 cases citing the landmark June 2020 Supreme Court ruling between Bostock and Clayton County.

The lawsuit also details several instances where McConaughey and his colleagues reportedly raised concerns about the harassment to no avail.

In all, McConaughey claims that between March 2019 and June 2020, he complained to management at least seven times that he was shamed and harassed by his supervisor and colleagues, but that his complaints “had no apparent impact.”

The lawsuit alleges his superior Brenneck retaliated by telling McConaughey’s union that he “betrayed the job on him.”

McConaughey claims the incidents amounted to a hostile work environment and retaliation against him.

He is seeking monetary damages and a jury trial in the case.

McConaughey’s attorney Daniel Kirschbaum told the Washington Examiner that the case should send a message that “anti-transdiscrimination is just as illegal and should be taken as seriously as any other form of harassment or discrimination.”

‘As a police officer [McConaughey’s] risking his own safety every day, in the interest of the public, and he wants the employer to respect his identity and stand behind him while protecting the public,” Kirschbaum said.

“It would be shameful for the government to engage in unlawful discrimination.”

DailyMail.com has contacted the Port Authority for comment.

The lawsuit, filed in Manhattan, is one of more than 300 cases citing the landmark Bostock v Clayton County Supreme Court ruling of June 2020 in the past year, Bloomberg reported.

Gerald Bostock was a child welfare coordinator in Clayton County, Georgia.

Gerald Bostock (pictured) was fired for 'inappropriate behavior from a district employee' when he joined a gay softball league

Gerald Bostock (pictured) was fired for ‘inappropriate behavior from a district employee’ when he joined a gay softball league

When he joined a gay recreational softball league outside of work, he was fired for “inappropriate behavior by a county employee,” his employer said.

This left him without work or health insurance as he recovered from prostate cancer.

Bostock, who had strong internal ratings for his job performance, filed a lawsuit alleging he was discriminated against because of his sexuality.

The Supreme Court ruled in favor of Bostock, ruling that a key provision of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, known as Title VII, which prohibits discrimination in the workplace on grounds including sex, protects gay, lesbian or transgender people from discrimination in the workplace. work.

The ruling marked the biggest moment for LGBTQ+ rights in the US since the Supreme Court legalized same-sex marriage nationwide in 2015.

Meanwhile, Republican-led states are currently fighting back against LGBTQ+ rights with more than 250 anti-LGBTQ laws filed in 33 states this year.

Among them is a push from Texas lawmakers to ban transgender students from participating in sports.

This is because Joe Biden has issued executive orders to improve LGBTQ+ rights, including lifting the ban on transgender people serving in the military.

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