WhatsNew2Day
Latest News And Breaking Headlines

Trans-Tasman translations: terms from Australia and New Zealand are deciphered

From skux, chilly bin and tu meke to cossie, doona and chewy – the VERY unique snake terms used by Kiwis and Aussies and causing trans-Tasman confusion

  • The jargon in Australia and New Zealand is very different despite our proximity
  • From ‘chur’, ‘bro’ or ‘tu meke’, there are countless sentences that are alone Kiwis know it
  • But there are also some Australian terms that also confuse a New Zealander
  • The Daily Mail list should help create mutual understanding of our bizarre sentences

There are many things that unite Australia and New Zealand: the queen as head of state, our very similar flags and a love for taking the mickey apart.

But when it comes to using our so-called common language, the gap between the Tasman Sea neighbors is greatest.

Here, Daily Mail Australia has compiled a list of some of the more unique sentences used in the two countries.

And although some sentences can lead to a few weird looks, nothing is more confusing than a trip to the beach. (Pictured: people with an esky - also known as a cold container)

And although some sentences can lead to a few weird looks, nothing is more confusing than a trip to the beach. (Pictured: people with an esky – also known as a cold container)

In Australia these belts are mentioned, but in New Zealand they are called jandals

In Australia these are called flip flops, but in New Zealand they are called jandals

In Australia these are called flip flops, but in New Zealand they are called jandals

Whether it’s a ‘trip to the dairy store (corner store) to grab some chuddy (chewing gum)’ or ‘Mandy grabbing a sad’ (with a tantrum), some Kiwi sentences will be answered with blank cans in Australia.

And a trip to the beach will cause the most confusion.

While Kiwis grab their jandals and togs and pack a box of beer in their cold bin, Australians will grab their swimmers, flip flops and fill their eskis with a plate.

And although one of those beers can be called a “stubbie,” you should be aware that the term can also refer to short shorts that are usually worn by young farmers.

Already confused?

In New Zealand you would say: 'We are going for a walk to the dairy (shop on the corner) to get some chuddy (chewing gum)'

In New Zealand you would say: 'We are going for a walk to the dairy (shop on the corner) to get some chuddy (chewing gum)'

In New Zealand you would say: ‘We are going for a walk to the dairy (shop on the corner) to get some chuddy (chewing gum)’

Another strange expression that is very common in the ditch but is rarely heard in Australia is ‘hard case’.

When New Zealanders say “Bill is hard case,” they simply mean that Bill can be trusted to make you laugh, while Australians who hear that phrase may think Bill is a bit of a troublemaker.

You can also hear a Kiwi say that “Bill is a skux,” which means that he is attractive. It is a term that is used most often by young people, or someone who tries to make themselves pass by as hip.

New Zealand YouTuber Jordan Watson, named How To Dad, tried to explain some New Zealand jargon in one of his videos, but even he had trouble translating.

In his video How to understand New Zealand Snake, he points out that New Zealanders often say ‘yes, no’ if they are unsure.

“Yes, no, I went to that party, but it was in the wop wops,” he says in the clip.

Wop wops means the middle of nowhere; similar – but not the same – as the Australian term woop woop.

But the misunderstanding does not flow in one direction. Many Australian terms cause scratching of the head in New Zealand.

Aussie gems such as servo, fles-o, doona and derro are unique on its banks.

When an Australian YouTuber took to the streets to share common Aussie jargon with visitors, he confused many tourists.

Expressions such as ‘chuck a sickie’, ‘onya mate’ and ‘chockers’ shook their heads.

Popular Kiwi jargon translated for Australians:

KIWI

Varsity

Tea

duvet

Cold container

jandals

Duffle

Bach / cradle

Chuddy

Chur

Dairy

Petrol station

Benefit

Skux

Grab a sad one

Scarfie

Choice

Kai

Cheerios

homeless

P

Hungus

Common

Tu meke

The wops

GC

Day

Twink

OTP

toastie

AUSTRALIAN

Uni

Supper

Doona

esky

flip flops

Swimmers / cossie

Vacation home

chewy

Thanks

Corner shop

Servo

Centrelink

Handsome man

Have a tantrum

Uni student

Good

Food

Frankfurter cocktail

Derros

Ice

Hungry

Good

Too good

Places far away

Good c ***

prankster

White out

Drinking

jaffle

.