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<pre><pre>Tragedy as a month-old baby dies of meningococci in a hospital in the Northern Territory

Tragedy as a month-old baby dies of meningococci in a hospital in the Northern Territory

  • A baby died after shrinking meningococcal B in the Northern Territory
  • The child was taken to the Darwin hospital in critical condition on 13 June
  • There have been five meningococcal cases in the Northern Territory this year
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A baby died after shrinking meningococcal B in the Northern Territory.

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The child, presumably less than six months old, was brought to the Royal Darwin Hospital in critical condition earlier this month.

The child died in hospital on Thursday, Department of Health confirmed.

There have been five meningococcal cases in the Northern Territory this year, but all previous cases were the W-strain.

A baby died after contractococcus B in the Northern Territory (Pictured: a child with symptoms of meningococcal B)

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The previous cases have occurred in both the Top End and Central Australia and both adults and children. None of these cases is connected.

In 2018 there were 10 confirmed meningococcal cases, including seven W, two B and one of unknown strain.

The Center for Disease Control (CDC) has urged the population to be aware of the early signs and symptoms of meningococcal disease. Although meningococcal disease is a rare disease, it can be very serious and people can deteriorate very quickly.

CDC Acting Director Dr. Rosalind Webby said the best protection for people against the disease was vaccination.

The child, presumably younger than six months old, was brought to the Royal Darwin Hospital in critical condition earlier this month

The child, presumably younger than six months old, was brought to the Royal Darwin Hospital in critical condition earlier this month

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The child, presumably younger than six months old, was brought to the Royal Darwin Hospital in critical condition earlier this month

WHAT IS OPINIONOCOCAL DISEASE

Meningococcal disease is a bacterial infection that can cause death within hours if it is not recognized and treated in time.

There are five main strains of the infection, all of which now have a vaccine in Australia.

Although the majority of victims will recover fully, 10% of those infected die and around 20% have a permanent disability.

If left untreated, the disease is fatal.

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Amputation is not uncommon. Nor is organ failure and kidney damage, with extreme cases requiring long-term dialysis.

Babies and children up to 5 years old account for two-thirds of the cases due to their less mature immune system

& # 39; Meningococcal is a bacterial disease with five strains, A, B, C, W and Y. It is carried by around one in ten people in the nose and throat. Most people who wear this do not get sick, but they are able to spread it to others who may become unwell, & she said.

& # 39; Symptoms can include fever, sleepiness, headache, vomiting, neck stiffness, and aversion to bright lights.

A widespread rash may develop that may look like red / purple spots or bruises and babies & # 39; s and babies & # 39; s may also refuse food and drink and get a high scream. If you are concerned, seek medical advice early. & # 39;

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The meningococcal ACWY vaccine is available free of charge to all people aged 1-19 in the NT.

Outside this age group, anyone older than six weeks can receive the vaccination through a private script from the doctor.

Meningococcal B vaccine is available on the private market for people from six weeks of age. Go to your doctor for a private script to get this vaccine.

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