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Traffic noise threatens Robins in Britain, the number of which could fall if they have difficulty hearing each other's calls. Man-made noise prevents the favorite bird of Great Britain from responding normally to danger, a study has found (stock image)

Traffic noise threatens the number of robins in Great Britain because they cannot hear each other's calls

  • The study revealed that artificial sounds mask signals between birds
  • This hinders their ability to communicate with each other through their songs
  • This has a negative impact on mating rituals and competition for food and shelter
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Traffic noise threatens Robins in Great Britain, the number of which could plummet if they struggle to hear each other's calls.

Man-made noise prevents Britain's favorite bird from responding normally to danger, a study has found.

Normally robins, which are very territorial, use birdsong to decide if they are fighting for scarce resources.

When a robin hears a complicated song from another robin, they know that that bird is aggressive and responds quickly with their own song.

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But a British study that Robins has found does not respond as quickly to complex numbers as there is background noise.

This means that Robins cannot accurately assess the level of the threat of another bird, which can lead to unnecessary battles over the territory, possibly reducing the number of birds.

Traffic noise threatens Robins in Britain, the number of which could fall if they have difficulty hearing each other's calls. Man-made noise prevents the favorite bird of Great Britain from responding normally to danger, a study has found (stock image)

Traffic noise threatens Robins in Great Britain, the number of which could plummet if they struggle to hear each other's calls. Man-made noise prevents the favorite bird of Great Britain from responding normally to danger, a study has found (stock image)

Researchers from Queen & # 39; s University Belfast played bird song to 15 robins to see if they would react differently if there was noise in the background.

Dr. Gareth Arnott, senior author of the School of Biological Sciences, said: & We found that the structure of birdsong could convey aggressive intentions, allowing birds to judge their opponent.

& # 39; But sound made by people can disrupt this crucial information that is passed between them by masking the complexity of their numbers used to acquire resources, such as territory and space for nests.

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& # 39; As a result, the birds receive incomplete information about the intention of their opponent and do not adjust their response correctly. & # 39;

Birdsong, which sounds so pleasant to human ears, sends important signals about the level of aggression and the willingness of birds to fight.

Every robin knows that when another robin enters his territory and sings a complex song, that means a turf war.

If they respond quickly, signaling aggression, it can send the other bird away.

This is exactly what the birds did when researchers played them pieces of speakers for a minute and placed a wooden puppet in sight of their nest.

When a robin hears a complicated song from another robin, they know that that bird is aggressive and responds quickly with their own song. But a British study that Robins has found does not respond to complex numbers as quickly as there is background noise (stock image)
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When a robin hears a complicated song from another robin, they know that that bird is aggressive and responds quickly with their own song. But a British study that Robins has found does not respond to complex numbers as quickly as there is background noise (stock image)

When a robin hears a complicated song from another robin, they know that that bird is aggressive and responds quickly with their own song. But a British study that Robins has found does not respond to complex numbers as quickly as there is background noise (stock image)

They sang back faster if the song was complicated.

But in recordings where white noise was placed behind the bird sounds, to mimic traffic noise, the birds seemed unable to see the difference between a non-aggressive simple song and an angry complex song.

They usually sing faster when an aggressive Robin is around, to show that they are willing to fight, but they didn't when there was background noise.

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The authors, whose study is published in the journal Biology Letters, say that this means that noise can affect Robins' ability to gain and retain food and shelter, and possibly affect mating rituals.

Dr. Arnott said: & # 39; The study is evidence that man-made noise impacts the living environment of animals and directly affects their ability to communicate well, which can affect the survival and population of birds.

& # 39; This needs to be further investigated to protect our valued biodiversity. & # 39;

The full findings of the study were published in the journal Biology Letters.

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