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Tradie who killed his cancer-stricken wife by plowing their car into a river is imprisoned

A cheating husband whose wife drowned after deliberately driving their car into an NSW river to “vent his anger” has been imprisoned for at least eight years.

Edward Kenneth Lord, 54, pleaded guilty to the manslaughter of his 25-year-old wife, Michele Lord, who died in October 2015 after he entered the Tweed River in northern NSW during a fight.

Lord, a concrete worker, had proposed a marriage to his beloved who worked in a massage parlor and went to live in his family home in Gold Coast as his maid.

Edward Kenneth Lord, 54, (photo left) was imprisoned for Friday 10 years and eight months after killing his wife in 2015 when he plowed their car into an NSW river

Edward Kenneth Lord, 54, (photo left) was imprisoned for Friday 10 years and eight months after killing his wife in 2015 when he plowed their car into an NSW river

Michele Lord, 57, (photo) was murdered by her husband after fighting with breast cancer and hiring a private investigator about her suspicion of her husband's case

Michele Lord, 57, (photo) was murdered by her husband after fighting with breast cancer and hiring a private investigator about her suspicion of her husband's case

Michele Lord, 57, (photo) was murdered by her husband after fighting with breast cancer and hiring a private investigator about her suspicion of her husband’s case

He persuaded his wife to let Siew Ping “Margaret” Fong stay downstairs in the bedroom, saying that she could help with housework as Mrs. Lord worked long hours and had been ill with breast cancer.

Mrs. Lord, 57, had become increasingly suspicious about his relationship with their “housekeeper” and approached the police for fear that he had put a sleeping tablet in her wine so he could have sex with Mrs. Fong.

Justice Ian Harrison in the NSW Supreme Court was imprisoned for ten years and eight months on Friday with a non-conditional release of eight years.

“Riding in the river was a deliberate but spontaneous act that was performed purely to vent his anger,” the judge said, citing the agreed facts.

“It entailed a considerable risk of serious injury to the Lord, but he had no intention of inflicting her serious injury or killing her.”

It took a while for Lord to admit what was happening. He originally told the police that Mrs. Fong was “just the housekeeper,” his marriage had been happy, and the wheel of the car had slipped away while “we were laughing.”

Family members of Michele Lord attended the NSW Supreme Court on Friday to see Edward Lord convicted

Family members of Michele Lord attended the NSW Supreme Court on Friday to see Edward Lord convicted

Family members of Michele Lord attended the NSW Supreme Court on Friday to see Edward Lord convicted

Michele's relatives, including her brother Graham Flatman, were reacted outside the court

Michele's relatives, including her brother Graham Flatman, were reacted outside the court

Michele’s relatives, including her brother Graham Flatman, were reacted outside the court

Mrs. Lord’s brother Graham Flatman said that her family had long wished for the truth after years of unanswered questions.

“We learned the truth, and to learn that her husband, a man we all knew and considered as part of our family, was complicit in Michele’s death, this whole trial made such an overwhelming and confronting experience,” said the Mr. Flatman out of court on Friday.

The family hoped that the death of the “happy, trusted, loving” woman was not in vain.

“It is our hope that everyone who is in similar circumstances to Michele will find the strength to achieve and trust all the great services that are available,” said Mr. Flatman.

Justice Harrison said that Lord hired a private investigator to follow her husband and Mrs. Fong, and that he discussed divorce proceedings with a lawyer.

Mrs. Lord hired a private investigator to keep an eye on her husband and Mrs. Fong, and had discussed divorce proceedings with a lawyer, also telling a friend that she had given Lord an ultimatum that they were looking for marriage therapy or if they would find him leave

Mrs. Lord hired a private investigator to keep an eye on her husband and Mrs. Fong, and had discussed divorce proceedings with a lawyer, also telling a friend that she had given Lord an ultimatum that they were looking for marriage therapy or if they would find him leave

Mrs. Lord hired a private investigator to keep an eye on her husband and Mrs. Fong, and had discussed divorce proceedings with a lawyer, also telling a friend that she had given Lord an ultimatum that they were looking for marriage therapy or if they would find him leave

She told a friend that she had given the Lord an ultimatum that they were looking for marriage therapy or leaving him.

She also spoke about his tendency to get angry and occasionally spontaneously and aggressively respond by hitting walls and shouting.

“These incidents include punching a hole in a wall of their bedroom when they argued about Mrs. Fong,” said Justice Harrison, citing agreed facts.

Lord, who did not testify at his hearing, told a psychologist about his remorse about what happened.

He described his wife as “one in a million, can never be replaced … she was my beloved, soulmate, best friend … she will be in my heart forever.”

But the judge found that Lord had failed to express regret and noted that words offered to a sympathetic clinician, far removed from public control, were a “somewhat weak alternative” to entering the witness stand.

“In my experience, true repentance is hard to suppress and easy to express,” said Justice Harrison.

The family hoped that the death of the “happy, trusted, loving” woman was not in vain and that others would speak in similar situations

The judge found that Lord had failed to express regret and noted that words offered to a sympathetic clinician, far removed from public control, were a “somewhat weak alternative” to entering the witness stand

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