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Two maiko-geishes walk through a street in the historic district of Gion in Kyoto. The district has banned tourists from taking photos on private roads and in private homes in the area

Tourists are forbidden to take photos of geisha & # 39; s on private roads in the historic district of Kyoto following complaints from visitors who & # 39; chasing them down the street & # 39; and pull on kimonos

  • The photography ban is set in the historic Gion district in Kyoto
  • Anyone who disputes the rules will receive a fine of up to 10,000 yen (£ 71 / $ 92)
  • Geisha's have complained that some tourists are taking photos without permission
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In a neighborhood with many Japanese geisha & # 39; s it is forbidden for tourists to take photos on private roads and in private homes.

The ban has been imposed in the historic Gion district in Kyoto with fines of 10,000 yen (£ 71 / $ 92) for anyone caught.

The new rule follows that some visitors to Gion have taken photos of geishes and maiko (apprentice geishes) without their permission, with some even being chased down the street or their kimonos & # 39; s are drawn.

Two maiko-geishes walk through a street in the historic district of Gion in Kyoto. The district has banned tourists from taking photos on private roads and in private homes in the area

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Two maiko-geishes walk through a street in the historic district of Gion in Kyoto. The district has banned tourists from taking photos on private roads and in private homes in the area

Other tourists are believed to have entered private grounds without permission to attempt to take photos of the women.

According to the Japanese broadcaster NHK the ban will relate to the small private alleys that lead to the famous Hanami-koji street.

The street is a major tourist attraction thanks to traditional restaurants and tea houses. However, tourists are still allowed to take photos there.

An association of local residents and shop owners distributes leaflets in Gion to inform tourists about the photography ban on private streets and will maintain this.

Japan today reports that video surveillance will be used to track offenders.

This is not the first time that Japan has imposed bad tourist behavior.

The famous Hanami-koji street, popular with tourists. Visitors to the area can still take photos here
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The famous Hanami-koji street, popular with tourists. Visitors to the area can still take photos here

The famous Hanami-koji street, popular with tourists. Visitors to the area can still take photos here

The city of Kamakura, in the east of the country and famous for its Great Buddha statue, has also issued an official ordinance that politely tells tourists not to eat while walking in crowded areas to prevent stains on other people's clothing.

The regulation describes eating while walking as a & # 39; public nuisance & # 39; because of the possibility of food spilling and being surrounded by tourist numbers of 60,000 a day in one part of the city – the Kamakura Komachi Dori shopping area.

For many, the signs seem a bit overbearing, but for the Japanese, they simply reinforce the normal etiquette in their country, which is sitting down to eat, so that food can be well appreciated.

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