Tourist Hotspots Give Vaccinated Travelers Access – But Aussies Still Can’t Leave

Dozens of countries around the world are opening their borders to vaccinated travelers – but Australians who refuse a shot may not be able to reach them.

After months of shutdown due to Covid-19, tourist hotspots including Thailand, the Seychelles and Greece are allowing travelers without quarantine to kick-start their post-pandemic economic recovery.

Some countries, such as Croatia, have even waived all testing requirements if arrivals show proof of vaccination, while others, such as Iceland, have considerably relaxed their rules for double-shot tourists.

Dozens of countries around the world are opening their borders to vaccinated travelers.  Pictured: Chiang Rai Province, Thailand

Dozens of countries around the world are opening their borders to vaccinated travelers. Pictured: Chiang Rai Province, Thailand

Some countries such as Croatia (pictured is Dubrovnik) have even waived all testing requirements if arrivals show proof of vaccination

Some countries such as Croatia (pictured is Dubrovnik) have even waived all testing requirements if arrivals show proof of vaccination

Some countries such as Croatia (pictured is Dubrovnik) have even waived all testing requirements if arrivals show proof of vaccination

Some countries are open to vaccinated travelers

Guatemala, Belize, Thailand, Croatia, Ecuador, Greece, Georgia, Estonia, Seychelles, Poland, Iceland, Romania, Lithuania, Lebanon

Source: Escape

Australians who receive their vaccines will be able to benefit once the federal government lifts the outgoing travel ban, which is in effect until at least September 17 and is likely to be extended until next year.

But those who refuse to get a shot may have trouble finding a flight, as airlines begin to require proof of vaccination.

Qantas boss Alan Joyce told ABC radio on Thursday morning: ‘I think we absolutely will do that internationally’ [require passengers be vaccinated], and that will become a worldwide standard.’

Unvaccinated Australians may also face more restrictions than their stung compatriots at home.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison said the national cabinet will discuss what restrictions they will face next year when every Australian is offered a shot.

‘People [who are] are not vaccinated, they are more at risk and [we] should have more restrictions on people who have not been vaccinated because they are a danger to themselves and others,” he told 3AW radio.

When asked what kind of restrictions they might face, he replied: “Well, these are the things we’re still working on because we’re not yet at the point where we have a high enough vaccination coverage across the country.” that makes those choices possible. made.

“But when we get to that point, I think Premiers and I have been very clear.

Other countries such as Iceland (pictured) have considerably relaxed their rules for double-jam tourists

Other countries such as Iceland (pictured) have considerably relaxed their rules for double-jam tourists

Other countries such as Iceland (pictured) have considerably relaxed their rules for double-jam tourists

Greece (pictured) has also relaxed its rules for vaccinated travelers after Covid-19 lockdowns

Greece (pictured) has also relaxed its rules for vaccinated travelers after Covid-19 lockdowns

Greece (pictured) has also relaxed its rules for vaccinated travelers after Covid-19 lockdowns

Poll

Should Aussies Refusing a Vaccine Be Banned From International Flights?

  • Yes 657 votes
  • new 395 votes

“Your own Prime Minister in Victoria has been very clear on this that if you choose not to get vaccinated… we must be careful not to put yourself in a position of risk of serious illness and death.”

NSW Prime Minister Gladys Berejiklian has previously said her state could allow cafes, pubs and shops to ban unvaccinated people.

Also on Thursday, Mr Morrison revealed he cannot guarantee Australians will live free at Christmas and admitted he should have ordered more Pfizer vaccines last year.

In a press conference on Wednesday, the prime minister said “lockdowns will be a thing of the past” when enough people are vaccinated and hoped Australians “will live differently at Christmas”.

But on Thursday morning, Mr Morrison warned that he cannot guarantee that lockdowns will not be necessary next year to contain the spread of Covid-19.

3AW broadcaster Neil Mitchell asked, ‘Do you think you can guarantee we’ll be open by the end of the year?

“No one can give those guarantees, Neil, because the virus is unpredictable,” the Prime Minister replied.

Earlier, Mr Morrison told the Today show that the highly contagious Delta strain of the virus, which broke out in India in April, requires stricter restrictions than previous strains to fight.

“The Delta strain is incredibly virulent and there is no country in the world that doesn’t struggle,” he said.

“Countries all over the world are struggling with this and we have learned a lot in recent weeks.

“Where the Delta species strikes, you have to act fast and we have to take that and move forward as quickly as possible.”

During his morning media blitz, Mr Morrison was also keen on the slow rollout of the vaccine and admitted he had made mistakes.

Morrison warned that he cannot guarantee that lockdowns will not be necessary next year to control the spread of Covid-19.  Pictured: Police patrol Bondi Beach during lockdown

Morrison warned that he cannot guarantee that lockdowns will not be necessary next year to control the spread of Covid-19.  Pictured: Police patrol Bondi Beach during lockdown

Morrison warned that he cannot guarantee that lockdowns will not be necessary next year to control the spread of Covid-19. Pictured: Police patrol Bondi Beach during lockdown

Only 17.73 percent of Australians over the age of 16 are fully stung, compared to 71.1 percent of eligible Brits, 65.2 percent of eligible Canadians and 49.4 percent of eligible Americans .

The rollout has been hampered by delivery delays and changing health advice about the AstraZeneca vaccine, prompting government efforts to bring in more Pfizer shots.

In July 2020, the US ordered 200 million doses of Pfizer, the UK 90 million and Canada 20 million.

But Australia didn’t order one until November, when it asked for just 10 million doses of the highly effective jab.

In April, the government increased the order to 20 million and doubled it to 40 million in June – but critics say this amount should have been ordered much earlier.

When asked if the government had closed a deal soon enough, Morrison told Sunrise host Natalie Barr: “We went from 10 million to 20 million to 40 million… now it’s about getting the job done.

Only 16.7 percent of Australians over the age of 16 are fully stung, compared to 71.1 percent of eligible Brits.  Pictured: Queues at the Homebush Vaccination Center in Sydney

Only 16.7 percent of Australians over the age of 16 are fully stung, compared to 71.1 percent of eligible Brits.  Pictured: Queues at the Homebush Vaccination Center in Sydney

Only 16.7 percent of Australians over the age of 16 are fully stung, compared to 71.1 percent of eligible Brits. Pictured: Queues at the Homebush Vaccination Center in Sydney

“Very late,” she said before admitting Morrison: “No country gets everything right and the vaccination program is reaching the points we need now.

“We just need to focus forward and get this job done, Nat,” he said.

On July 9, the Prime Minister announced a four-step plan to bring Australia back to normal, with each step to start when vaccination coverage reaches a certain percentage.

The required percentages have been calculated by model experts from the Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity and handed over to the government.

They will be discussed in the National Cabinet on Friday and are expected to be released publicly early next month.

What are the four stages of opening?

1. Vaccinate, Prepare and Trial (from July 14)

Arrival caps halved to 3,035 per week; lockdowns and state border closures as a last resort; trials of seven-day home quarantine for vaccinated arrivals; medicare vaccination certificates available in apps like Apple Wallet

2. Post-vaccination phase (when a still unannounced percentage of Aussies are stung, expected early next year)

No lockdowns or state borders except in ‘extreme circumstances’; limits for unvaccinated arrivals doubled to 6,070; home quarantine for vaccinated arrivals; limited entry for students and economic visa holders

3. Consolidation phase (date not disclosed)

Removal of all outbound travel restrictions for vaccinated travellers; no limits for vaccinated arrivals; vaccinated people exempt from domestic restrictions; increased limits for students and visa holders; more travel bubbles arise with countries like Singapore; booster shots rolled out

4. Final phase (date unknown)

Unlimited arrivals for vaccinated people without any quarantine and unlimited arrivals for unvaccinated people with pre-departure and on-arrival testing

.