Tory Remainers demand that hardline Eurosceptics leave the party

Dominic Raab (photo above), the former Brexit secretary who is thought to write a possible future leadership opportunity, led the opposition against Ms. May

Moderate Tories begged Brexit hardliners to end their war against Theresa May and called on & # 39; all parties to come together & # 39; and to focus on the & # 39; national interest & # 39 ;.

Despite the fact that the prime minister won the support of about two-thirds of her MPs, the critics resume their attacks. Dominic Raab, the former Brexit secretary who is thought to devise a possible future leadership channel, led the opposition to Ms. May by publicly letting her go. Mr. Raab said it was difficult to see how she could stay while confirming that he had not supported her in the vote.

Boris Johnson, a hopeful other leadership, is also supposed to oppose the fact that Mrs. May was in charge, but has so far refused to comment publicly.

And Jacob Rees-Mogg, the president of the European Research Group, continued to call for yesterday to stop claiming to be critically undermined.

Dominic Raab (photo above), the former Brexit secretary who is thought to write a possible future leadership opportunity, led the opposition against Ms. May

Dominic Raab (photo above), the former Brexit secretary who is thought to write a possible future leadership opportunity, led the opposition against Ms. May

Moderate Tories begged Brexit hardliners to end their war against Theresa May (pictured above)

Moderate Tories begged Brexit hardliners to end their war against Theresa May (pictured above)

Moderate Tories begged Brexit hardliners to end their war against Theresa May (pictured above)

This is while Brexit supporter Robert Courts – who succeeded David Cameron in Witney – said that the critics of Ms. May had failed in their putsch.

He said that those who questioned Ms. May's leadership had their answer & # 39; while those who demanded stability & # 39; had it & # 39 ;.

The intervention came because loyalists today lost the patience with the Brexiteer rebels, saying that they would never stop & # 39; and that if the apocalypse comes, everything that is left are ants and that Tory MPs complain about Europe & # 39 ;.

Alistair Burt, secretary of state, struck the hardline eurosceptics who promised to keep up the fight against Theresa May despite her dramatic victory with last night's confidence.

Jacob Rees-Mogg (pictured above), the chairman of the European Research Group, has called on the Prime Minister to stop

Jacob Rees-Mogg (pictured above), the chairman of the European Research Group, has called on the Prime Minister to stop

Jacob Rees-Mogg (pictured above), the chairman of the European Research Group, has called on the Prime Minister to stop

Iain Duncan Smith

Iain Duncan Smith

Dominic Raab today confirmed that he voted against Mrs. May in the vote of confidence

Dominic Raab today confirmed that he voted against Mrs. May in the vote of confidence

Iain Duncan Smith (left) confirmed that he was up to 117 members of parliament who voted against the Prime Minister. Dominic Raab (right) today confirmed that he voted against Mrs. May in the vote of confidence

Boris Johnson (left and right), hopeful in the field of leadership, is also supposed to be against Ms. May who is in charge, but has so far refused to comment openly

His warning came when the smoke went away after the extraordinary coup-offer with Dominic Raab and Iain Duncan Smith, in which they confirmed that they were among 117 MPs who voted against the Prime Minister.

Mr. Duncan Smith said that the revolt had sent a message by more than a third of the parliamentary party, who used his office as a base, & # 39; that Ms. May has to change course.

The pro-EU Conservative wing replied furiously and demanded that the hardliners accept that they had lost the ballot box – or that they would leave the party altogether.

Mrs. May is going to Brussels today while she is trying to squeeze more concessions from the EU on the Brexit deal

Mrs. May is going to Brussels today while she is trying to squeeze more concessions from the EU on the Brexit deal

Mrs. May is going to Brussels today while she is trying to squeeze more concessions from the EU on the Brexit deal

In the meantime, Ministers and Tory moderates advocated the Brexiteers hardline to end their attacks on the prime minister, warning that they were risking a catastrophe for the party and for the Brexit. Some even warned that the resentment could split the party.

Tory Vice President James Cleverly said: "Some colleagues, perhaps out of frustration (are) saying foolish things about other conservatives. It would be a good time to stop. Respect the results of the two referenda – 52 percent leave the EU and 63 percent in support of Theresa May. & # 39;

Raab, who left the cabinet in protest against the Brexit deal by Ms. May, seemed to try to position herself as her successor by openly sympathizing with her opponents.

He said: "We should support her as best we can, but the problem is that both with regard to the Brexit and the wider sustainability of the government, given the likelihood of any changes in the deal, given the probable size of the the opposition, it looks very difficult to see how this prime minister can help us.

My biggest fear now is that if she continues, there is a greater risk of a Jeremy Corbyn government – so very much in grief, not in anger, I did not vote for her last night. & # 39;

Mr. Rees-Mogg continued to ask Ms. May to stop yesterday and said to Radio 4's broadcast: "Perhaps you remember that Margaret Thatcher said," We're fighting, we are fighting to win. "No one was more difficult than Ms. Thatcher and the next day she resigned, so it's not impossible. & # 39;

Other Eurosceptic Tories, however, suggested that it was time to end the sniping. Crispin Blunt, who wrote a letter of no confidence in Ms. May, and Nadine Dorries, another outspoken critic, said it was time to respect the result of the vote of confidence.

A series of conservative MPs urged the rebels to unite the party. Sir Nicholas Soames, the Tory MP for Mid Sussex, called upon Mr. Rees-Mogg to "think about the horrifying failure of his efforts not to give Theresa May and the problems he has committed"; .

& # 39; Now a period of rest and a good dose of humility is required. Enough now, shut up, "he added.

Minister of Foreign Affairs Alistair Burt twittered: "After the apocalypse there will only be ants and Tory MPs complaining about Europe and their leader. & # 39;

Michael Fabricant, the MP for Lichfield, said: & # 39;[The] Tories must now unite and avoid the self-destruction of important years. & # 39;

In the meantime former minister Nicky Morgan suggested that a split in the Conservatives is about to pop up, with hardline Eurosceptics leaving the party. She told the BBC: "I think it is inevitable that some of these people – the most difficult Brexiteers – will run.

& # 39; There might be some sort of reconfiguration of parties on the right side of the British political spectrum and that may be something that we have to accept to get a Brexit deal through the Commons. & # 39;

May admit that she is NOT getting a new Brexit deal and that she is re-planning the vote before Christmas Day

Theresa Left the hope of holding a showdown about her Brexit deal before Christmas today.

The prime minister has the chances of a 'direct breakthrough & # 39; printed at the top of this week.

The Commons vote on the Brexit deal that was due to take place on Tuesday, but at one point they were put on the shelf after Ms. May had accepted that she would be defeated.

When she arrived in Brussels for an EU summit, Mrs May acknowledged that she needed new guarantees from EU leaders regarding the operation of the Northern Ireland backstop when the agreement was to come through the Commons.

A Downing Street spokeswoman confirmed that it was the Government's intention to get the Commons to be in January & # 39; to vote.

The Austrian Chancellor Sebastian Kurz, currently holding the rotating EU Presidency, proposed to hold a special Brexit summit in January.

The idea is to provide additional guarantees & # 39; to agree on the political statement on the future relationship of the UK with the EU.

The Prime Minister had publicly admitted that although she was in her heart & # 39; wants to fight, her time in power comes to an end when she arrived in Brussels for a crunch summit.

And she urged EU counterparts to make concessions to the Irish border catcher that wrote the package about the & # 39; could get.

Minister of Foreign Affairs, Alistair Burt, said that the Tories are now & # 39; on the brink of an abyss & # 39; danced.

& # 39; They never stop, never. Voting against them, letters that come in late – nothing is important to ERG, "he said.

& # 39; After the apocalypse there will only be ants and Tory MPs complaining about Europe and their leader. & # 39;

Former Minister Nicky Morgan told the BBC: "I think it is inevitable that some of these people – the most difficult Brexiteers – will start running.

& # 39; There may be some sort of reconfiguration of parties on the right side of the British political spectrum and that is something that we must accept to sign a Brexit deal through the House of Commons. & # 39;

There have been claims that Brexiteers would even be willing to join Labor and have no confidence in the government to get Ms. May out of it. But asked about the probability of the prospect today, the senior Eurosceptic Sir Bill Cash replied: "Not at all."

Mr. Courts waded in the civil war on Twitter.

He said: & # 39; When we think about a new dramatic day in Westminster, it is clear that the Conservative Party has confidence in the leadership of the prime minister. Those who question the leadership now have their answers. Those who are concerned with stability now have it.

It is now time for all parties to come together and provide the country with the unity it is all about. My concerns have always been about policy and not personality. Bele minded disagreements are an inseparable part of the serious politics – and I am sure that there will be solid debates.

& # 39; But it is now time for colleagues to stop talking about leadership, to focus on the job that is available and to move forward in the national interest.

The Prime Minister has my full support in finding an acceptable, legally binding solution for the backstop and delivering the good, uncompromising Brexit agreement that I think is within reach. & # 39;

Brexit supporter Robert Courts – who succeeded David Cameron in Witney – said that the critics of Ms. May had failed in their putsch and had to go further

While the fight is raging at home, Ms. May goes to Brussels today, looking for new concessions for her Brexit deal.

After a drama day in Westminster, she travels to the EU summit with another seemingly impossible task to move on the backstop of the Irish border.

When she spoke in Downing Street after blocking the ballot box last night, Mrs. May acknowledged that a & # 39; substantial & # 39; some of her MPs had voted against her and she said: "I listened to what they were saying. & # 39;

She promised legal and political guarantees & # 39; for the Brexit backstop to take away parliamentary concerns about its withdrawal agreement when attending a European Council meeting on Thursday.

And she said that she and her government have a revitalized mission & # 39; And we had to say: & # 39; After this vote, we must continue with the task of providing Brexit for the British people and building a better future for this country. & # 39;

She said that this should mean that politicians from all sides come together and act in the national interest & # 39 ;.

But she had sown the seeds before her final departure by telling Tory MPs at a meeting of the 1922 committee that she would not lead the party to the next general election, expected in 2022.

According to parliamentarians who were present at the meeting, they also promised a legally binding solution & # 39; to ensure that the UK is not permanently entangled in a backstop scheme to keep the Irish border open after the Brexit.

The scope of this task was highlighted by the Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar and the European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker, who insisted that the UK withdrawal agreement can not be reopened or contradicted & # 39;

DUP leader Arlene Foster, who met Mrs May shortly before the vote, insisted that & # 39; tinker at the edges & # 39; of the agreement would not be enough to win the support of her party for the deal.

Boris Johnson

Boris Johnson

David Davis also hinted that he would rebel

David Davis also hinted that he would rebel

Boris Johnson (pictured on the left) is thought to have been one of those who went against the prime minister, although he refused to confirm in what way he voted. David Davis (right) also hinted that he would rebel

1922 committee chairman Sir Graham Brady announced the dramatic result of the no-confidence vote at the Commons last night

1922 committee chairman Sir Graham Brady announced the dramatic result of the no-confidence vote at the Commons last night

1922 committee chairman Sir Graham Brady announced the dramatic result of the no-confidence vote at the Commons last night

Michael Gove

Michael Gove

Jacob Rees-Mogg

Jacob Rees-Mogg

Michael Gove (pictured to the left on the left) urged people to support the PM. Jacob Rees-Mogg (right) said that the result showed that Theresa May should stop

Mrs Foster, whose 10 MEPs support the conservative government of the minority, told the Prime Minister that "we did not seek promises or promises, we wanted fundamental changes to the legislative text".

England legends Gary Lineker and Peter Shilton are bumping over the Brexit

Gary Lineker called his & # 39; hero & # 39; Peter Shilton about the Brexit

Gary Lineker called his & # 39; hero & # 39; Peter Shilton about the Brexit

Gary Lineker called his & # 39; hero & # 39; Peter Shilton about the Brexit

Gary Lineker called his & # 39; hero & # 39; Peter Shilton about the Brexit

Gary Lineker called his & # 39; hero & # 39; Peter Shilton about Brexit when he praised Jacob Rees-Mogg

Gary Lineker called his & # 39; hero & # 39; Peter Shilton on Brexit after the keeper from the former England had praised Jacob Rees-Mogg.

The Match of the Day presenter, 58, also told former teammate Chris Waddle that he ought to stay at football & # 39; when he said it would be best if Theresa left the EU without a deal.

Last month, Mr Lineker, an outspoken Remainer, appeared during a People's Vote & # 39; Attempt in which he called for a second referendum and said that stopping & # 39; frighteningly boring & # 39; Theresa May & # 39; s Brexit is more important to him than football.

When Ms. May last night survived her resistance to non-trust, the former Spurs and the Barcelona striker gave contempt for Peter Shilton's praise for Tory Brexiteer Rees-Mogg.

Shilton, who played for the beloved Leicester City of Mr. Lineker, tweeted: "I was so impressed by @Jacob_Rees_Mogg in recent days. He really knows what he is talking about and conveys it in a calm and calculated way! & # 39;

Gary Lineker responded to him and said: "What is that old saying? You should never see a tweet of your heroes? & # 39 ;.

Arch-Brexiteer and leader of the European research group, Jacob Rees-Mogg, called for Theresa May's call to resign after the vote, noting that she trusted more than a third of her MPs and a majority of her backbenchers had lost.

Mr. Duncan Smith asked Theresa May this morning to engage her hard Brexit critics & # 39; and their worries about the backstop & # 39; to resolve by refusing the UK £ 39billion divorce payment to the EU.

We can not go on with the idea that there is a violin and a violin here, but the problem is, "Duncan Smith said to the Today program of BBC Radio 4.

& # 39; There is a compromise, but it is the backstop that needs to be resolved. & # 39;

Mr. Duncan Smith called on Philip Hammond to "moderate" your language & # 39; after the chancellor had suggested Wednesday's vote was a way to "wash away" the extremists from the Conservative Party & # 39;

The former secretary for work and pensions said many Tory MPs were frustrated about the idea that Downing Street has not listened to & # 39; He added: "I have a simple message for the Chancellor: when you start your own party and make accusations about them, that is the beginning of the end for your party.

You have to moderate your language and acknowledge that a party is a coalition and we have to get this thing through the line. I do not want to see the party where it is at the moment. & # 39;

Another Brexiteer, David Jones, pointed out that leadership campaigns were already under way.

I do not doubt that there were people in the hall who welcomed the Prime Minister but were part of one campaign or another, & # 39; he said.

Simon Hart, who founded the Brexit Delivery Group of Tory backbenchers and supports the Prime Minister, said: & # 39; I brought potential candidates to me. I have had people whom I have not spoken nine years ago since I was elected for the first time in 2010 to use this opportunity to sell their own credentials and to participate in a private beauty parade. & # 39;

Ms. Morgan suggested that a division in the conservatives threatens to occur, with hardline Eurosceptics leaving the party.

She told the BBC: "I think it is inevitable that some of these people – the most difficult Brexiteers – will run.

& # 39; There may be some sort of reconfiguration of parties on the right side of the British political spectrum and that is something that we must accept to sign a Brexit deal through the House of Commons. & # 39;

Teflon Theresa and her ever-present & # 39; rock & # 39 ;: the unwavering support of PM & # 39; s husband has seen her weather the storm

Philip May waved goodbye to his beloved wife – and prime minister – this morning as she began the last grueling test – a new EU summit where she advocates major changes to the Brexit deal.

Mr. May, 61, has made a successful career in the City of London as an investment manager.

But it is his role as the husband of Theresa May, confidant and & # 39; rock & # 39; who is perhaps his biggest contribution to the country.

Mr May's dedication to his wife was re-seen yesterday when she was forced to face her Tory rebels and a fierce Labor opposition to PMQs.

Mrs. May, 62, fought for her political life, while Tory MPs had called a trusting vote that could have brought her down by the end of the day without mercy.

When she entered the Commons Chamber, where the plans of the Tory rebels on the green benches sat on her back, while Labor MPs scolded her and put her right ahead, she looked up and saw her husband staring at her fondly.

Theresa May and Philip (pictured together in 1980 - the year they married) are loved ones since their days as students and connected about their shared love of cricket

Theresa May and Philip (pictured together in 1980 - the year they married) are loved ones since their days as students and connected about their shared love of cricket

Theresa May and Philip (pictured together in 1980 – the year they married) are loved ones since their days as students and connected about their shared love of cricket

Theresa May (pictured with Philip in 1977) has told her husband that her & # 39; rock & # 39; is the one who supported her during the many political upheavals she faced

Theresa May (pictured with Philip in 1977) has told her husband that her & # 39; rock & # 39; is the one who supported her during the many political upheavals she faced

Theresa May (pictured with Philip in 1977) has told her husband that her & # 39; rock & # 39; is the one who supported her during the many political upheavals she faced

He let himself smile as the couple closed his eyes and Mrs. May defended herself defensively in the onslaught of attacks that swept her way.

The couple have been together for about 40 years – as a bachelor student at the University of Oxford and married in the eighties.

They were introduced in a student disco – known as a & # 39; bop & # 39; – by mutual friend Benazir Bhutto – later Prime Minister of Pakistan.

And although neither Philip nor Theresa particularly enjoy the spotlight or are seeking, they have lovingly told that it was love at first sight for them in a rare joint TV appearance.

During the last year's election campaign during the BBC 's One Show they gave the country insight into their relationship – and how the power ensures that Mrs. May stays at her darkest moments.

Asked about how their romance flourished, Mr. May said: "It was love at first sight, absolutely."

And asked for his first impressions of the woman who would become his wife, he said: "What a sweet girl!" And he boldly added: & And she still is. & # 39;

Who could replace Theresa May? As the prime minister admits that they have to stop soon, these are some of the leading contenders to take over

Theresa May won her vote of confidence with Tory last night after she promised not to lead the party to the general election in 2022.

These are some of the leading contenders to replace her:

Boris Johnson – 7/2

How did they vote on the Brexit?

Led the Stemverlof campaign alongside Michael Gove.

What is their opinion now?

Hard line Brexiteer demands a clean break from Brussels. The former foreign minister is vehemently opposed to the Dammen plan by Theresa May and a leading voice demanding a deal in Canadian style.

What are their chances?

Mr. Johnson's greatest challenge could be to follow the Tory leadership rules.

He is certain that he has achieved a split between the Tory members, but must first be chosen by conservative MPs as one of the two best candidates.

Now valued as a favorite by the bookmakers, Boris Johnson & # 39; s (photo of the parliament leaving last night) will be the biggest challenge by navigating the Tory leadership rules

Now valued as a favorite by the bookmakers, Boris Johnson & # 39; s (photo of the parliament leaving last night) will be the biggest challenge by navigating the Tory leadership rules

Now valued as a favorite by the bookmakers, Boris Johnson & # 39; s (photo of the parliament leaving last night) will be the biggest challenge by navigating the Tory leadership rules

Dominic Raab – 9/2

How did they vote on the Brexit?

Leave, with a second-rate role to campaign for Voting Leave.

What is their opinion now?

Mr Raab was installed as Brexit Secretary to deliver the Checkers plan, but resigned sensibly last month because the deal was not good enough.

What are their chances?

His resignation from the cabinet put missile boosters under the chances of Mr. Raab, who fed his popularity among the hardline Brexiteers. May it be difficult to overcome larger animals and better known figures.

Installed as a Brexit secretary, Dominic Raab (photo on Tuesday) is trying to negotiate the Brexit deal from Theresa May

Installed as a Brexit secretary, Dominic Raab (photo on Tuesday) is trying to negotiate the Brexit deal from Theresa May

Installed as a Brexit secretary, Dominic Raab (photo on Tuesday) is trying to negotiate the Brexit deal from Theresa May

Sajid Javid – 5/1

How did they vote on the Brexit?

Stay but stayed low in the referendum.

What is their opinion now?

Pro supplies the Brexit and is skeptical about the soft Brexit options.

What are their chances?

Probably the leading candidate from the cabinet after his dramatic promotion as Minister of Home Affairs. Mr Javid distinguished himself from Ms May on a series of policy measures, in particular immigration.

Sajid Javid (photo of the Houses of Parliament tonight) is probably the leading candidate from within the cabinet after his dramatic promotion to Home Secretary

Sajid Javid (photo of the Houses of Parliament tonight) is probably the leading candidate from within the cabinet after his dramatic promotion to Home Secretary

Sajid Javid (photo of the Houses of Parliament tonight) is probably the leading candidate from within the cabinet after his dramatic promotion to Home Secretary

Michael Gove – 7/1

How did they vote on the Brexit?

Leave

What is their opinion now?

He has said that Theresa May's Checkers Blueprint for Brexit is the right one for now & # 39 ;. But he recently suggested that a future prime minister could change the relationship between the UK and the EU if they wanted to.

What are their chances?

He finished third in the first round of voting in 2016, behind the eventual winner Theresa May and Andrea Leadsom. Mr. Gove said that it is highly unlikely & # 39; is that he will stand again. But he is popular in the party and is seen by many as an ideas man and a reformer, and he could change his mind when Theresa May is shown the door.

Michael Gove seemed to rule himself out of the race the last few days, but he has been running lately and is popular with many in the game. He is pictured outside the Houses of Parliament today

Michael Gove seemed to rule himself out of the race the last few days, but he has been running lately and is popular with many in the game. He is pictured outside the Houses of Parliament today

Michael Gove seemed to rule himself out of the race the last few days, but he has been running lately and is popular with many in the game. He is pictured outside the Houses of Parliament today

Jeremy Hunt – 7/1

How did they vote on the Brexit?

Stay.

What is their opinion now?

The foreign minister claims that the & # 39; arrogance & # 39; a Brexiteer from the EU Commission.

What are their chances?

Another top contender in the cabinet, Mr. Hunt's stock rose during his record-breaking stint at the Department of Health and won a major promotion to the Department of Foreign Affairs following the resignation of Mr. Johnson. Widely seen as a safe pair of hands that could be an advantage if the game comes suddenly.

Jeremy Hunt's stock rose during his record-breaking period at the Department of Health and won a major promotion to the Department of Foreign Affairs after the resignation of Mr. Johnson

Jeremy Hunt's stock rose during his record-breaking period at the Department of Health and won a major promotion to the Department of Foreign Affairs after the resignation of Mr. Johnson

Jeremy Hunt's stock rose during his record-breaking period at the Department of Health and won a major promotion to the Department of Foreign Affairs after the resignation of Mr. Johnson

David Davis – 10/1

How did they vote on the Brexit?

Leave.

What is their opinion now?

Leave and support the abolition of Ms. May's plan and the pursuit of a trade agreement with the EU in Canada.

What are their chances?

The favorite choice of many hard Brexiteers. Seen as a safer pair of hands than Mr. Johnson and about the details of the current negotiations after two years as Brexit Secretary. He could be promoted as a carer to see Brexit before he would get up.

It is unlikely that the choice of supporters will remain within the Tory party – and was previously rejected by the Tory members in the race against David Cameron in 2005.

David Davis (pictured today outside the Houses of Parliament) is seen as a safer pair of hands than Mr. Johnson and in the details of the current negotiations after two years as Brexit Secretary

David Davis (vandaag afgebeeld buiten de Houses of Parliament) wordt gezien als een veiliger paar handen dan de heer Johnson en in de details van de huidige onderhandelingen na twee jaar als Brexit-secretaris

David Davis (vandaag afgebeeld buiten de Houses of Parliament) wordt gezien als een veiliger paar handen dan de heer Johnson en in de details van de huidige onderhandelingen na twee jaar als Brexit-secretaris

Amber Rudd – 14/1

Hoe hebben ze gestemd over de Brexit?

Blijven. Vertegenwoordigde Groot-Brittannië sterker in Europa in de tv-debatten.

Wat is hun mening nu?

Sterk blijven en steun voor een tweede referendum – vooral gezien de keuze tussen die en geen deal.

Wat zijn hun kansen?

Populair bij conservatieve parlementsleden als de stem van het Toryisme in de Cameron-stijl, wordt Rudd nog steeds gezien als een mededinger, ondanks haar ontslag in het Windrush-schandaal – en ze kreeg een extra duwtje in de goede aarde door haar terugkeer naar het kabinet als secretaris voor werk en pensioenen op vrijdagavond. Ze wordt zwaar belemmerd door een kleine meerderheid in haar kiesdistrict Hastings en zou de Tory-partij niet kunnen verenigen in een plotselinge wedstrijd over de Brexit-onderhandelingen.

Populair bij conservatieve parlementsleden als de stem van het Toryisme in de Cameron-stijl, wordt Amber Rudd (die vanavond het parlement verlaat) nog steeds gezien als een mededinger ondanks zijn ontslag in het Windrush-schandaal

Populair bij conservatieve parlementsleden als de stem van het Toryisme in de Cameron-stijl, wordt Amber Rudd (die vanavond het parlement verlaat) nog steeds gezien als een mededinger ondanks zijn ontslag in het Windrush-schandaal

Populair bij conservatieve parlementsleden als de stem van het Toryisme in de Cameron-stijl, wordt Amber Rudd (die vanavond het parlement verlaat) nog steeds gezien als een mededinger ondanks zijn ontslag in het Windrush-schandaal

Jacob Rees-Mogg – 14/1

Hoe hebben ze gestemd over de Brexit?

Het verlof.

Wat is hun mening nu?

Verlaten en onlangs gebrandmerkt Theresa May's Brexit U-turn een 'vernedering' die haar deal 'verslagen' heeft achtergelaten.

Wat zijn hun kansen?

Als voorzitter van het blok van de European Research Group (ERG) van Tory Eurosceptics heeft hij er bij de parlementsleden op aangedrongen om mevrouw May wekenlang te vervangen.

Pro-Brexit-supporter, conservatief parlementslid Jacob Rees-Mogg, loopt door leden van de media en anit-brexit demonstranten terwijl hij gisteren in de buurt van de Houses of Parliament in Londen wandelt

Pro-Brexit-supporter, conservatief parlementslid Jacob Rees-Mogg, loopt door leden van de media en anit-brexit demonstranten terwijl hij gisteren in de buurt van de Houses of Parliament in Londen wandelt

Pro-Brexit-supporter, conservatief parlementslid Jacob Rees-Mogg, loopt door leden van de media en anit-brexit demonstranten terwijl hij gisteren in de buurt van de Houses of Parliament in Londen wandelt

Penny Mordaunt – 14/1

Hoe hebben ze gestemd over de Brexit?

Het verlof.

Wat is hun mening nu?

Verlof en onderwerp van hardnekkig gerucht dat zij de volgende zou zijn om te stoppen met het kabinet over de Brexit-deal van mevrouw May.

Wat zijn hun kansen?

Mogelijk donker paard in de wedstrijd, Mordaunt is niet goed bekend bij het publiek, maar wordt gezien als een mededinger in Westminster. Bekend om diepe bezorgdheid te koesteren over de deal van mevrouw May's Brexit, maar is gestopt met aftreden bij het kabinet.

Mogelijk donker paard in de wedstrijd, Penny Mordaunt (afgebeeld in Downing Street) is niet goed bekend bij het publiek, maar wordt gezien als een mededinger in Westminster

Mogelijk donker paard in de wedstrijd, Penny Mordaunt (afgebeeld in Downing Street) is niet goed bekend bij het publiek, maar wordt gezien als een mededinger in Westminster

Mogelijk donker paard in de wedstrijd, Penny Mordaunt (afgebeeld in Downing Street) is niet goed bekend bij het publiek, maar wordt gezien als een mededinger in Westminster

Andrea Leadsom – 16/1

Hoe hebben ze gestemd over de Brexit?

Het verlof.

Wat is hun mening nu?

Ms Leadsom said in late November that she was backing the withdrawal agreement struck with Brussels because it 'delivered' on the referendum result.

What are their chances?

Leader of the Commons since June, Andrea Leadsom found herself at the centre of controversy in the 2016 leadership campaign when comments she made were interpreted as a claim that she would be a better PM than Mrs May because she was a mother. Asked recently whether Mrs May was the right person to be leading the country, she said she is 'at the moment'.

Andrea Leadsom, Leader of the House of Commons, arrives at Downing Street on Thursday last week

Andrea Leadsom, Leader of the House of Commons, arrives at Downing Street on Thursday last week

Andrea Leadsom, Leader of the House of Commons, arrives at Downing Street on Thursday last week

Gavin Williamson – 33/1

How did they vote on Brexit?

Remain.

What is their view now?

Mr Williamson tweeted today: 'The Prime Minister has my full support. She works relentlessly hard for our country and is the best person to make sure we leave the EU on 29 March and continue to deliver our domestic agenda.'

What are their chances?

He backed Remain in the referendum and pledged his support for Mrs May in the 2016 leadership contest but has since been mentioned as a potential future Tory leader.

Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson is a 33/1 outsider according to the best odds by bookies this evening

Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson is a 33/1 outsider according to the best odds by bookies this evening

Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson is a 33/1 outsider according to the best odds by bookies this evening

THE 180-PLUS TORY MPs WHO VOWED TO BACK THERESA MAY IN CONFIDENCE VOTE

Michelle Donelan – Chippenham

Antoinette Sandbach – Eddisbury

Rebecca Pow     – Taunton Deane

David Warburton – Somerton and Frome

Jo Churchill                 – Bury St Edmunds

George Freeman       – Mid Norfolk

Dr Phillip Lee     – Bracknell

John Glen             – Salisbury

Julian Smith         – Skipton and Ripon

Kit Malthouse                      – North West Hampshire

Oliver Letwin             – West Dorset

Gavin Williamson   – South Staffordshire

John Howell          – Henley

Sarah Newton          – Truro and Falmouth

Stephen Crabb     – Preseli Pembrokeshire

Rory Stewart        – Penrith and The Border

Robert Buckland – Swindon South

Mel Stride                             – Central Devon

Matt Hancock           – West Suffolk

Robin Walker  – Worcester

Damian Hinds                      – East Hampshire

Victoria Prentis – Banbury and Nth Oxon

Jesse Norman – Hereford and South Herefordshire

Sam Gyimah               – East Surrey

Jonathan Djanogly – Huntingdon

Geoffrey Cox                       – Torridge and W. Devon

Tobias Ellwood  – Bournemouth East

Nigel Huddleston      – Mid Worcestershire

Simon Hoare           – North Dorset

Adam Afriyie      – Windsor

Richard Harrington – Watford

James Heappey      – Wells

Marcus Jones – Nuneaton

Huw Merriman                    -Bexhill and Battle

Helen Grant     – Maidstone and Weald

Amanda Milling – Cannock Chase

Richard Benyon                  – Newbury ‏

Iain Stewart – Milton Keynes South

Alex Burghart – Brentwood and Ongar

Paul Masterton – East Renfrewshire

Damian Green                     – Ashford

Dominic Grieve – Beaconsfield

Gillian Keegan – Chichester

Gareth Johnson – Dartford

Chris Grayling                     – Epsom and Ewell

Colin Clark                            – Gordon

Oliver Dowden – Hertsmere

Theresa May- Maidenhead

Peter Heaton-Jones – North Devon

Kelly Tolhurst – Rochester and Strood

Gordon Henderson – Sittingbourne + Sheppey

Kwasi Kwartang – Spelthorne

Peter Bottomley – Worthing West

Peter Aldous – Waveney

Kemi Badenoch – Saffron Walden

Guto Bebb – Aberconwy

Paul Beresford – Mole Valley

Andrew Bowie – West Aberdeenshire and Kincardine

Jack Brereton – Stoke-on-Trent South

Kenneth Clarke – Rushcliffe

David TC Davies – Monmouth

Mark Field,  – Cities of London and Westminster

Kevin Foster – Torbay

Lucy Frazer – South East Cambridgeshire

David Tredinnick – Bosworth

Jeremy Lefroy    – Stafford

Robert Halfon      – Harlow

Vicky Ford    – Chelmsford

Heidi Allen               – South Cambs

Kevin Hollinrake    – Thirsk and Malton

Jake Berry – Rossendale and Darwen

Liz Truss                    – South West Norfolk

Chris Skidmore – Kingswood, Sth Glos

Julian Knight        – Solihull

Craig Whittaker    – Calder Valley

Nick Hurd – Ruislip, Northwood and Pinner

Steve Brine   – Winchester

Luke Hall         – Thornbury and Yate

Bim Afolami – Hitchin and Harpenden

Mary Robinson    – Cheadle

Dame Caroline Spelman – Meriden

Andrea Leadsom                – South Northants

Alan Mak                – Havant

Michael Ellis – Northampton North

Alok Sharma       – Reading Wes

Alistair Burt               – North East Bedfordshire

Nick Boles         – Stamford

Margot James                      – Stourbridge

Justin Tomlinson     – North Swindon

David Lidington – Aylesbury

Andrew Stephenson         – Pendle

Dr Liam Fox                          – North Somerset

Bob Neill – Bromley and Chislehurst

Sarah Wollaston   – Totnes

Sir Alan Duncan – Rutland and Melton

David Mundell – Dumfries

Harriett Baldwin – West Worcestershire

Steve Barclay – North East Cambridgeshire

Mark Lancaster – Milton Keynes North

Stuart Andrew     – Pudsey

John Penrose – Weston-super-Mare

Heather Wheeler – South Derbyshire

Caroline Dinenage – Gosport

Jackie Doyle-Price – Thurrock

Kirstene Hair                        – Angus

Bill Grant – Ayr, Carrick and Cumnock

Dr Dan Poulter – Central Suffolk and Nth Ipswich

Giles Watling                       – Clacton

Claire Perry                          – Devizes

Maggie Throup – Erewash

Caroline Dineage – Gosport

Bob Seely                              – Isle of Wight

George Hollingberry – Meon Valley

Roger Gale – North Thanet

Caroline Nokes – Romsey and Southampton North

Seema Kennedy – South Ribble

Karen Bradley – Staffs Moorlands

Ben Wallace – Wyre and Preston North

Mike Freer – Finchley and Golders Green

Nusrat Ghani – Wealden

Andrew Griffiths – Burton

Caroline Johnson – Sleaford and North Hykeham

John Lamont – Berwickshire, Roxburgh and Selkirk

Phillip Lee – Bracknell

Iain Liddell-Grainger – Bridgwater and West Somerset

David Lidington – Aylesbury

Jack Lopresti – Filton and Bradley Stoke

Paul Maynard – Blackpool North and Cleveleys

Jeremy Wright – Kenilworth and Southam

Matt Warman – Boston and Skegness

James Cartlidge – South Suffolk

Michael Gove – Surrey Heath

Rachel Maclean – Redditch

Alec Shelbrooke – Elmet and Rothwell

Alun Cairns – Vale of Glamorgan

Mark Spencer – Sherwood

Greg Clark – Tunbridge Wells

Penny Mordaunt – Portsmouth North

Philip Hammond – Weybridge

Paul Scully – Sutton and Cheam

David Gauke – South West Hertfordshire

Patrick McLoughlin – Derbyshire Dales

Mims Davies     – Eastleigh

Alex Chalk   – Cheltenham

Maria Miller – Basingstoke

Amber Rudd – Hastings and Rye

Stephen Hammond – Wimbledon

Sajid Javid   – Bromsgrove

James Cleverly                    – Braintree

Nick Gibb – Bognor Regis and Littlehampton

Nadhim Zahawi – Stratford-on-Avon

James Brokenshire – Old Bexley and Sidcup

Jeremy Hunt – South West Surrey

Therese Coffey – Suffolk Coastal

Brandon Lewis – Great Yarmouth

Ed Vaizey – Wantage and Didcot

Tom Tugendhat – Tonbridge and Malling

Andrew Bowie – West Aberdeenshire

Guy Opperman – Hexham

Nicholas Soames – Mid Sussex

Andrew Jones – Harrogate

Alberto Costa – South Leicestershire

Wendy Morton – Aldridge-Brownhills

David Morris – Morecambe

Oliver Heald – North East Hertfordshire

Chris Heaton-Harris – Daventry

Richard Graham – Gloucester

Robert Jenrick   – Newark

Leo Docherty – Aldershot

Nick Herbert – Arundel and South Downs

David Duguid -Banff and Buchan

Edward Argar – Charnwood

Trudy Harrison – Copeland

Alister Jack – Dumfries and Galloway

Helen Whately – Faversham and Mid Kent

Neil O'Brien – Harborough

Victoria Atkins – Louth and Horncastle

Glyn Davies – Montgomeryshire

Luke Graham – Ochil and South Perthshire

Robert Goodwill -Scarborough + Whitby

Dr Andrew Murrison – South West Wiltshire

Stephen Kerr                       – Stirling

Mark Menzies – Fylde

Nicky Morgan – Loughborough

Neil Parish – Tiverton and Honiton

Mark Pawsey – Rugby

Andrew Percy – Brigg and Goole

Chris Philp – Croydon South

Chris Pincher – Tamworth

Mark Prisk – Hertford and Stortford

David Rutley, – Macclesfield

Chloe Smith – Norwich North

Anna Soubry – Broxtowe

Gary Streeter – South West Devon

Julian Sturdy – York Outer

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