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Top NYC private schools rocked by CRT scandals issue COVID vaccine mandates

New York City’s most exclusive and expensive fee-paying schools require students over the age of five to receive the COVID-19 vaccine.

The principals of elite schools, including Spence, Chapin in Manhattan’s posh Upper East Side and Horace Mann, in the Bronx, have sent letters and emails to parents asking them to shoot students during winter break.

The schools, many of which are described as the “Ivy League of Preparatory Schools” and charge more than $55,000 a year, are asking for children who are fully vaccinated to come back from their Christmas vacation.

Some schools have already notified parents via letter of impending requirements and deadlines for students to receive the jab.

New York City has announced a new COVID-19 vaccine mandate requiring all non-public school workers to receive their first injection by December 20

“It is now expected that all Spence students, ages 5-11, will have received their first dose of COVID vaccine by January 7, 2022 and will be fully vaccinated by February 11, 2022,” Spence’s principal body Brizentine wrote to parents last month.

Religious and medical exemptions will be considered before this Monday.

“No exceptions will be accepted after this date,” Brizentine warned.

Thomas Kelly, principal of the school at Horace Mann sent a similar letter.

“Nobody with kids ages five to 11 should be surprised by the school’s decision to mandate the new Pfizer vaccine,” Kelly wrote in an emailed note.

It affects about 56,000 employees of 938 yeshivas, Catholic schools and other private schools, including the posh $57,000-a-year girlish Spence School on Manhattan's Upper East Side.

It affects about 56,000 employees of 938 yeshivas, Catholic schools and other private schools, including the posh $57,000-a-year girlish Spence School on Manhattan’s Upper East Side.

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio has also extended his order that COVID-19 vaccines be required for all teachers and staff of private and religious schools before the winter break.

De Blasio, a Democrat, said Thursday that employees of non-public schools must demonstrate that they have received at least one dose of a vaccine by December 20.

The order applies to approximately 56,000 employees at 938 schools in New York City and includes some of the city’s most elite educational institutions, including Spence, Chapin and Horace Mann.

De Blasio issued a mandate that came into effect in October demanding the shots for workers in the city’s public school system, the largest in the country.

De Blasio extended the mandates to city staff, including police officers, firefighters and sanitation workers, and this week extended the mandate to childcare workers.

“We are committed to protecting our students and school staff, and a mandate for non-public school staff will help keep our school communities and youngest New Yorkers safe,” de Blasio said in a statement.

The incoming mayor, Eric Adams, has also said he supports mandatory vaccinations for students. ‘We already have a system in which it says that you get your vaccination before you go to school. It’s to protect the child and the student population,” Adams said.

City hall officials said vaccinations will be offered at any private or religious schools that request it and the city will work with school officials to prepare for the mandate deadline and ensure they comply.

Prestigious girls' schools, including the pictured Chapin, were rocked last year by accusations of racism by generations of black graduates

Prestigious girls’ schools, including the pictured Chapin, were rocked last year by accusations of racism by generations of black graduates

City officials have not disclosed how many private school employees have already been vaccinated or how the city would enforce the mandate on private schools.

Public school teachers and staff who failed to follow the city’s previous order were placed on unpaid leave.

In addition to private, those attending Catholic schools and Jewish yeshivas will have to be vaccinated against the coronavirus, in what is believed to be the largest effort in the nation to force religious schools to adhere to a vaccine mandate.

The decision not to allow religious exemptions was met with immediate opposition from some Jewish and Catholic leaders.

Rabbi David Zwiebel, the chairman of NYC’s Committee of Religious and Independent School Officials, said in a letter to the mayor on Thursday that the committee “strongly opposes” the mandate and urged him to reconsider it.

“While we support and generally encourage Covid vaccination in our schools, and while the vast majority of our schools’ staff are so vaccinated, most of our schools do not insist on such vaccination as a working condition. Many of our schools view Covid vaccination as a matter best left to individual choice, not government approval,” Zwiebel wrote in the letter.

Horace Mann Headmaster Thomas Kelly told parents not to be surprised by the school's new vaccine mandate.

Horace Mann Headmaster Thomas Kelly told parents not to be surprised by the school’s new vaccine mandate.

“This is one area where the government should use its pulpit to persuade, not its regulatory arm to coerce.”

He said a small number of unvaccinated workers will likely continue to resist getting the shots and schools will struggle to fill vacancies.

Most of New York City’s COVID-19 vaccine mandates have faced legal challenges, but were largely overturned by the courts.

New York state is one of the few states to have abolished the religious exception to the vaccination requirements for schoolchildren.

Earlier this year, parents of the swanky Spence School for all girls at $57,000 a year in Manhattan's Upper East Side neighborhood began a letter-writing campaign demanding the academy

Earlier this year, parents of the swanky Spence School for all girls at $57,000 a year in Manhattan’s Upper East Side neighborhood began a letter-writing campaign demanding the academy “step back” from its awakened agenda.

The 2019 move came amid the country’s worst measles outbreak in decades, with a majority of outbreaks in New York City in Orthodox Jewish communities.

Misinformation campaigns sparked resistance to restrictions and safety guidelines at the height of the pandemic.

While about 77 percent of New Yorkers have received one dose of the vaccine, it’s only 51 percent in Brooklyn’s Borough Park and 59 percent in South Williamsburg.

Both areas are home to both large Orthodox and Hasidic communities.

Earlier this year, parents of the swanky Spence School for all girls at $57,000 a year in Manhattan’s Upper East Side neighborhood began a letter-writing campaign demanding the academy “step back” from its awakened agenda.

A mother involved in the letter-writing campaign revealed how girls’ school students were shown a video mocking “nasty” and “righteous” white women.

Earlier this year, a parent of another girls’ school, The Brearley, wrote to other parents complaining about the teachings of Critical Race Theory – questioning American history and society, emphasizing the role slavery played. in the founding of the country.

Proponents of CRT argue it’s a much-anticipated rebalancing of the curriculum: Opponents say it divides children by skin color, and tells white children to feel guilty about their skin.

A teacher at another school, Grace School, even resigned in protest at teaching CRT.

Republicans have seized on the spat, citing it as an example of the dangers of “awakened” philosophies being imprinted on young minds.

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