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Top journal to require researchers to investigate how findings ‘might perpetuate gender stereotypes’

A major academic journal has asked its researchers to detail how “sex and gender” were taken into account in each of their individual studies.

The guide, put into practice by Nature’s top brass last week, also calls for staff investigate how their findings “could perpetuate gender stereotypes” before publishing the results, officials announced last week.

“From now on, researchers submitting articles to a subset of Nature Portfolio journals will be required to indicate whether and how sex and gender were considered in their study design,” the heads of the prestigious British journal wrote in a post announcing the policy last week. .

The prestigious academic journal Nature has implemented a new policy that requires its researchers to detail how the

The journal, run by British geneticist Magdalena Skipper, has previously been criticized for failing to meet the expectations of the awakened left, apologizing in April 2020 after correctly labeling the coronavirus as a

The prestigious academic journal Nature has implemented a new policy that requires its researchers to detail how “sex and gender” were taken into account for each of their individual studies. The magazine, run by British geneticist Magdalena Skipper, has previously been criticized for not adhering to the awakening left.

The guidance, put into effect by the top brass of the science journal last week, requires staff to analyze how their findings

The guidance, put into effect by the science journal’s top brass last week, requires staff to investigate how their findings “could perpetuate gender stereotypes” before publishing any results, officials said last week in an op-ed. announcing the change.

The publication, an opinion piece titled ‘Nature Journals Raise the Bar on Sex and Gender Reporting in Research,’ further asks scientists and clinicians conducting studies ‘to state that sex and gender analyzes were not conducted, and to clarify why. ‘.

According to officials at the 153-year-old publication, which has long published medically and scientifically important tomes, the rule seeks to erase the bias created by research studies that ‘do not take into account sex and gender’.

The announcement also saw organizers require researchers to ‘note in the title and/or abstract if the results apply to only one sex or gender’, using the terms ‘sex’ and ‘gender’ separately; the first refers to biological sex and the second describes the gender with which one identifies.

The announcement also prompted organizers to require researchers to note in the title and/or abstract if the findings apply only to one sex or gender, using the terms 'sex' and 'gender' separately;  the first refers to biological sex and the second describes the gender with which one identifies.

The announcement also prompted organizers to require researchers to note in the title and/or abstract if the findings apply only to one sex or gender, using the terms ‘sex’ and ‘gender’ separately; the first refers to biological sex and the second describes the gender with which one identifies.

1653328177 499 Top journal to require researchers to investigate how findings might

1653328178 943 Top journal to require researchers to investigate how findings might

The publication, an opinion piece titled

The publication, an opinion piece titled “Nature Journals Raise the Bar on Sex and Gender Reporting in Research,” further asks scientists and clinicians conducting studies “to indicate that sex and gender analyzes were not conducted, and to clarify why”.

The changes will apply primarily to studies looking at human participants, journal staff members said, but will also cover studies offering data on animals, and even cells.

According to officials at the 153-year-old publication, which has long published tomes of both medical and scientific importance, the rule seeks to erase the bias created by research studies that

According to officials at the 153-year-old publication, which has long published medically and scientifically important tomes, the rule seeks to erase the bias created by research studies that “do not take sex and gender into account.”

“The changes apply to studies with human participants, in other vertebrates, or in cell lines, in which sex and gender are an appropriate consideration,” the staff wrote.

Cell lines refer to cultures taken from a single human or animal cell. The samples, which effectively serve as clones of the original cell, are then used for testing, since testing on a living human or animal cell is considered inhumane.

Investigators will also need to provide evidence of ‘informed consent’ before sharing data about a person’s sex or gender, officials write.

In addition, scholars will need to categorize data relating to sex and gender, and clearly differentiate the two sets of samples.

“The goal here is to improve understanding of the extent to which reporting on sex and gender is already part of study design, data collection and analysis in the research these journals publish,” Brass wrote in the journal about the new politics.

“Journals will also assess author and reviewer reception of the changes so we can iterate on them as we learn through experience.”

The company says that as of June, four of its newspapers – Nature Cancer, Nature Communications, Nature Medicine and Nature Metabolism – will announce the policy for Raise awareness of the lack of representation of sex and gender in other academic journals, which they said have failed’take sex and gender into account in their studies.

Employees wrote: ‘By making these changes, we aim to promote transparency in study design and ultimately make the findings more precise. Over time, we hope to see the integration of sex and gender analysis into the default study design.’

1653328182 487 Top journal to require researchers to investigate how findings might

Since then, Skipper, a 21-year Nature veteran and 53-year-old, has shown his desire to

Since then, Skipper, a 21-year Nature veteran and 53-year-old, has shown a desire to “transform” academia by using more “social science.”

The magazine, run by British geneticist Magdalena Skipper, has previously been criticized for not adhering to the awakening left.

In April 2020, during the early days of the pandemic, the newspaper was criticized for referring to the coronavirus as a Chinese disease in one of its magazines, even though it was once common practice to link viral illnesses to their area of ​​outbreak. .

After facing a swift public outcry and accusations of racism, Nature admitted ‘an error on our part’ for being part of the press coverage that called the virus Chinese.

Since then, Skipper, 53, a 21-year veteran of Nature, has shown his desire to ‘transform’ the academic world using more ‘social science’.

Nature did not immediately respond to DailyMail.com’s request for comment on the new policy on Monday.

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